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Three Parker Pens Left By My Late Father ... Are They Valuable?


silicon
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Hello everyone.

 

My late father passed away in 2012.

 

Amongst his possessions I kept were four fountain pens.

 

He used to write in green ink ... he used fountain pens all the time.

 

I've attached a picture in the hope that you can advise me what to do with them. I have no idea of the value and have no attachment to them so would like to sell them ideally.

 

post-122504-0-12490400-1483726172_thumb.jpg

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Where is the fourth pen?

From left to right Parker 51, 61 and 45. I wouldn`t sell them if I were you, mostly because they are not worth that much - perhaps a little over 100 pounds - Parker experts will tell you more precisely. I would keep them for my children maybe, who knows, some genes skip a generation and they could be into fountain pens. :)

Parker 51 Vacumatic 0.7 Masuyama stub; TWSBI 540 M; TWSBI 580 1.1; Mabie, Todd and Bard 3200 stub; Waterman 14 Eyedropper F; 2 x Hero 616; several flexible dip nibs

owned for a time: Parker 45 flighter Pendleton stub, Parker 51 aerometric F, Parker 51 Special 0.7 Binder stub, Sheaffer Valiant Snorkel M, Lamy Joy Calligraphy 1.5 mm, Pelikan M200 M, Parker Vacumatic US Azure Blue M, Parker Vacumatic Canada Burgundy F, Waterman 12 Eyedropper, Mabie Todd SF2 flexible F

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I might give the value as little higher, depending on condition, and since the 61 is a Signet, which brings a bit more than your run of the mill 61.

 

The Sheaffer might be interesting to see (note the spelling - no "c" but two "f"s in Sheaffer.)

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From my knowledge and further research on ebay UK completed lists it appears the value of your pens are ( I have assumed they are in working order and are in very good condition )

 

Left to right as per your photograph :

 

Parker 51 Mk II Aerometric - £40

 

Parker 61 Insignia – also commonly refered to as a Signet ( capillary feed ) - £60

If you look closely at the cap it will be marked ‘ Rolled Gold ‘ , the barrel will be gold fill.

 

Parker 45 GT ( Gold Trim ) - £30

It will have a 14 carat solid gold nib and a detachable metal ink converter.

 

The 51 & 61 are worth about £10 - £15 more if you have the original box in very good condition.

 

I hope this helps.

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I think if the 61 insignia's cap is Rolled Gold, the barrel too would be Rolled Gold. Likewise, if the pen's cap is Gold Filled the barrel would also be Gold Filled.

 

Further, if the pen is made in England its body would be Rolled Gold and if made in USA it would be Gold Filled.

 

Value is what one is willing to pay for them. But generally between $120 and $150 for all three.

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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Wise words as always from mitto

 

I would like to ask what markings do ' gold fill ' pens have to indicate that they are.

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Thank you all so much for the advice...

 

Frustratingly I can't upload many pics here ... it seems very limited.

 

I will see what I can do to optimise them and upload more detail abut them... if anyone is interested in buying them all I am happy to sell them.

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Wise words as always from mitto

 

I would like to ask what markings do ' gold fill ' pens have to indicate that they are.

1 10

12 K

G F

 

for gold filled as opposed to

 

1 10

12 CT

R G

 

for Rolled Gold.

 

Parker 61 Insignia Gold Filled and Rolled Gold:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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actually which is more valuable rolled gold or gold filled?

If the gold content is the same then there is no difference on this count. Although the process of gold filling and gold roll may be a little different.

Khan M. Ilyas

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Not hot water please. These are thermoplastics, so warm at most. Most folks generally use about a cap or two of household ammonia and a few drops of Dawn dish detergent diluted in a small glass of water. I don't know what is available in the UK, but something like that to help break down the dried ink. Some detergents can harm a pen, but Dawn is safe. The other thing you could use is Koh-I-Noor Rapidoeze pen cleaner, followed by a clear water flush. You are likely to find it on line or at an art supply store. Higgins Pen Cleaner could also work, though I prefer Rapidoeze.

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actually which is more valuable rolled gold or gold filled?

 

Rolled gold and gold-filled are synonyms so far as the process is concerned. The process is bonding a layer of gold to base metal.

 

The amount of gold used varies, and ideally should be stated on the pen. By convention, the term "gold-filled" can be used only if the gold layer is 1/20 of the weight of the object, or more, whereas "rolled gold" can apply to, for example, a 1/40 layer. But of course rolled gold may also be 1/20 of the weight of the object.

 

If the gold content is stated, you know what you are getting. An object said to be made with rolled gold can in fact contain just as much gold as an object said to be gold-filled.

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actually which is more valuable rolled gold or gold filled?

 

 

In addition to what Jerome Tarshis wrote, the country of origin seemed to be a determining factor in whether the pen was "gold filled" or "rolled gold." USA-made Parkers seem to use the "gold filled" term and UK-made Parkers seemed to use "rolled gold." There really is no difference in value between a USA or UK signet or custom (gold cap/plastic barrel) 61.

Parker: Sonnet Flighter, Rialto Red Metallic Laque, IM Chiseled Gunmetal, Latitude Stainless, 45 Black, Duovac Blue Pearl Striped, 51 Standard Black, Vac Jr. Black, 51 Aero Black, 51 Vac Blue Cedar, Duofold Jr. Lapis, 51 Aero Demi Black, 51 Aero Demi Teal, 51 Aero Navy Gray, Duofold Pastel Moire Violet, Vac Major Golden Brown, Vac Deb. Emerald, 51 Vac Dove Gray, Vac Major Azure, Vac Jr. Silver Pearl, 51 Vac Black GF Cap, 51 Forest Green GF cap, Vac Jr. Silver Pearl, Duovac Senior Green & Gold, Duovac Deb. Black, Challenger Black, 51 Aero Midnight, Vac. Emerald Jr., Challenger Gray Pearl, 51 Vac Black, Duofold Int. Black, Duofold Jr. Red.

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Thanks to mitto I have learnt alot this afternoon. ( thanks for the GF photography )

 

Looked at my small Parker collection of the 17 Gold cap Parker pens - all are Rolled Gold Made in England.

 

This is a lift from the parkerpens.net :

 

( for the europeans here micrometer = micron )

 

Gold filled or Overlay :

A solid layer of gold, mechanically bonded to brass, or sometimes other materials, with heat and pressure. Usually about 80-120 micrometer thick. One micrometer is 1/1000 of a millimeter. (ca. 0.000039 inches)
To be stamped 10K the layer must equal at least 1/10 of the total weight of the item.
To be stamped 12K or higher the layer must equal at least 1/20 the total weight of the item.

RolledGold:
Same process as the above, but the gold sheet is rolled down after the bonding, which produces a thinner layer of gold, usually 20-40 micrometer thick.

 

Goldplated:
Gold plating is usually a thinner layer than the above. Electroplating chemically adds a very thin layer of gold to the base material. Much more prone to brassing. Usually less than 10-20 micrometer thick.

 

If I have read this right, American Parker pen 'gold fill' is 4 times thicker than 'rolled gold'.

Which then leads to the question of value..........I know which one I would buy if offered both at the same price.

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@ Slimfish, in case of Parker the gold content (1/10) as well gold purity (12k, 14k or 16k) are almost always mentioned on the pens whether gold filled or rolled gold. And these are generaly the same on both the gold filled and rolled gold pens. So no question of American gold filled thicker than English rolled gold.

 

Edited to add:

 

Observe, for example, the pictures I provided of the American gold filled and English rolled gold 61 Insignia pens. Both are 1/10 gold and both are 12k and, hence, no difference neither in thickness nor purity of the gold.

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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RolledGold:

Same process as the above, but the gold sheet is rolled down after the bonding, which produces a thinner layer of gold, usually 20-40 micrometer thick.

 

It also results in a thinner layer of the base metal, so the relative fractions of each remain very similar. I.e., gold and brass respond almost the same to the subsequent rolling process after the bonding.

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

Robert Frost

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