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What Pen Won't You Buy?



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I started thinking about this when I read a listing for a German pen made in the 40s.

And I thought: "I can't have a Nazi pen!"

For entirely different reasons I don't buy pens with clips because I don't wear shirts with pockets. And I don't much like modern, inflexible nibs. Otherwise I'd have a million damn pens - even with these constraints I have too many, but that's a job for my therapist.

 

So, what's your line in the sand?

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I started thinking about this when I read a listing for a German pen made in the 40s.

And I thought: "I can't have a Nazi pen!"

I don't agree with your argument that a German pen made in the 40s is a "Nazi Pen". Is a modern Waterman pen a "socialist" pen? Is a modern pen made in the US a "democratic" pen (soon to be a "republican" pen)?

 

The fact that a pen is manufactured in a certain country during a certain historical period does not mean the pen shares the politics of that period.

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I don't agree with your argument that a German pen made in the 40s is a "Nazi Pen". Is a modern Waterman pen a "socialist" pen? Is a modern pen made in the US a "democratic" pen (soon to be a "republican" pen)?

 

The fact that a pen is manufactured in a certain country during a certain historical period does not mean the pen shares the politics of that period.

Actually, any pen made in the USA is a republic pen. The USA is a republic, not a democracy.

 

But I do agree that just because a pen was made during a certain period does not disqualify it from me owning. Unless it had the Nazi symbol on it. Then I might own it for collectors reasons. Although it may be a period of time we don't want to remember, we should not forget out past, good or bad.

Peace and Understanding

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I don't buy Cross pens, even for the ubiquitous graduation gift. A few years back they ran a series of print ads I found particularly sexist and I decided I was done.

 

Sharon in Indiana

"There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self." Earnest Hemingway

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Actually, any pen made in the USA is a republic pen. The USA is a republic, not a democracy.

 

But I do agree that just because a pen was made during a certain period does not disqualify it from me owning. Unless it had the Nazi symbol on it. Then I might own it for collectors reasons. Although it may be a period of time we don't want to remember, we should not forget out past, good or bad.

Well, this thread is going to shut down fast...

 

Nazi Pen: if it has a swastika on it, yes. Otherwise, it's a war era pen to me.

 

America, Republic or Democracy?: It's a republic. And a representative democracy. And a democracy...well, at least in California where we direct vote on state propositions entirely bypassing representatives. I'm sure there are several other forms of democracy it qualifies under. These are not always either/or, mutually exclusive terms.

 

What pen won't I buy?: bad ones. ;-)

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In terms of quality, I have a (small) number of modern Conklins and I also have some Monteverdes. The quality, let us say, is different from the the other pens that I have and thus no more of those!

 

I hope that at some point they can reach the quality of other companies and then I will be happy to buy some more.

 

Erick

 

Using right now:

Narwhal Schuykill "F" nib running Wahl-Eversharp Everberry

Cleo Skribent Classic "F" nib running PR Plum

ASA Nauka Flora "F" nib running Green ink

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So, what's your line in the sand?

I draw a line in the sand if the pen is clipless. A pen without a clip just somehow feels incomplete. Even my Kaweco Sport, I got the optional clip with it.

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If I buy a pen in California does that make it a Blue pen and if I buy a pen in South Dakota is it a Red pen?

 

I tend to pass on modern pens but you wouldn't know that based on the pens that I just packed for shipment.

San Francisco International Pen Show - The next great pen show is on schedule for August 27-28-29, 2021. If we all do what we need to do...you can Book your travel and tables and make SF 2021 the Return. 
 

 My PM box is usually full. Just email me: my last name at the google mail address.

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I don't expect to buy any more Noodler's pens. Two of three Nib Creapers, my only Konrad thus far, and one of three Ahabs were too much trouble to get working.

Too many Monteverdes are reported to have the finish flake off of the section for me to purchase them, regardless of their extraordinary beauty.

I doubt I will ever again budget over $100 for a single pen, unless currency inflation or career advancement leads me to earn more than $20/hr.

I do like a clip on my pens.

I doubt I'll buy any more pens that are "sleek" -- either a hooded nib, or an inlaid nib, or a conical nib. I like the section to have a distinct stop at the end.

I wouldn't want a pen with a section smaller than 9mm diameter.

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I started thinking about this when I read a listing for a German pen made in the 40s.

And I thought: "I can't have a Nazi pen!"

 

http://i2.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/195/646/1320529223886.jpg

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Of the ones I own, I might not replace the Konrad if it were lost or broken to the point of not being repairable. I like it but perhaps not to the point of spending $35 ($20+$15 nib) for a replacement. And definitely not $40 +$15 for a replacement nib.

 

I like my JInhao 599, but it has had the nib worked on. If it were lost, I may or may not replace it either. Not that it is a bad pen, but it was a gift. And I wouldn't pay to have the nib done again. So if I did it would be take my chances or not replace it.

 

I would pretty much stay away from pens that are 30 grams or more in weight. I only have one, a True Writer Silver Anniversary. And for extended sessions it is just to heavy. So pens that exceed that regardless of the pen (assuming cost not an object) I would pass on. Even if they ticked all the boxes otherwise.

 

Would I buy a war era pen - even from a German manufacturer? Probably if it was a pen I otherwise liked.

Edited by Runnin_Ute

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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I like mango cheesecake

Will not buy any more Jinhao pens. Will not buy anymore Noodlers pens. Both had bad experiences with these. Also cannot get around to buy the Lamy 2000 even though everyone says it's a style icon.

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inkstainedruth

I won't buy pens that are too large and heavy for my hand. I won't buy pens with urushi finishes because I am really allergic to poison ivy. I won't buy pens which I think are tacky or overly bling-y: my pens are writing instruments, not expensive tchotchkes, that get put in display cases to show how much disposable income I have (the most recent example I've personally seen is the Krone John Hancock LE (http://www.kronepen.com/products/john-hancock/) -- all I can say about that is that I'm glad it's an LE pen because I'd hate to think of those being in regular use....

I won't buy pens with skulls on them, or swastikas. Or snakes.

I have yet to buy a pen that breaks the $200 US price point (I won't say never on that, because there's a couple of pens that do cost more than that which I really want someday).

I would like to say that I wouldn't buy any counterfeit pens. I do have what is probably a fake Hero 616, but I didn't buy it.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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I have had pretty good luck with made in China Cross fountain pens ($20.00). They work quite well for me. But no more ball points or roller balls by Cross made in China. Barrel and cap screw thread problems right out of the box.threads try to self destruct to put in a filler. Pen caps won't click into place and falls off. Terrible in my opinion. I would send them back to Cross but its not worth my time and trouble. Afraid I'll get more of the same anyway.

Edited by Studio97
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Big, heavy metal pens. I prefer that a pen be light enough that I can write for hours with it.

"Oh deer."

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There was a "handmade" ballpoint that required "piston" that screwed down to hold the filler so the filler was a retractable twist pen. Piston may not be the right word but I kept dropping it trying to put it back into the pen body. Paid too much for it too. Then that little metal piece dissapeared. No more of them

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I don't buy Cross pens, even for the ubiquitous graduation gift. A few years back they ran a series of print ads I found particularly sexist and I decided I was done.

 

Sharon in Indiana

I wonder if that was after the move to manufacturing in China. As stated above I have problems with them.

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I have had pretty good luck with made in China Cross fountain pens ($20.00). They work quite well for me. But no more ball points or roller balls by Cross made in China. Barrel and cap screw thread problems right out of the box.threads try to self destruct to put in a filler. Pen caps won't click into place and falls off. Terrible in my opinion. I would send them back to Cross but its not worth my time and trouble. Afraid I'll get more of the same anyway.

We may see Cross manufacture come back to the USA, per Cross CEO Baird.

"I think every Rhode Islander has a story of a friend or a neighbor or an aunt or an uncle who worked at A.T. Cross or knew someone who worked at A.T. Cross," Raimondo said.

 

Baird said his longer-term plans include moving more manufacturing work back to the United States.

 

BTW, which Cross model are you referring to. I'd avoid the cheap Cross found in Staples that come in the blister packs. Stick with their traditional lines like the Century 2, ATX, Townsend etc. I've found the Chinese made Cross are still high quality over the years, better than some German, Italian or Japanese made pens.

Edited by max dog
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