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Böhler Glorex, Nib And Model Question


stephanos
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I am looking for information on a Böhler Glorex model.

 

  • The pen has "Böhler Glorex" on the cap.
  • The nib is marked "Degussa" and has a half-sun logo (presumably gold-plated steel). I have yet to write with it (it's filled with water, rehydrating the cork), but it looks like a Fine-grade nib
  • It is a piston-filler, with blind cap.
  • The back of the barrel is marked 36 and FL

 

It's my understanding that the manufacturer is Böhler, and the model is Glorex. So, can anyone tell me what the << 36 >> and the << FL >> indicate?

 

My best guess (poor as that is) is that they mean the following:

36 is either the year of production (1936, though that seems a little early) or some kind of sub-model name (i.e. Glorex 36)

FL indicates Fine Left-handed.

 

Ideas? Thanks in advance!

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Hello Stephanos !

 

Very simple :

36 is the model number corresponding to the pen size in the Glorex range.

FL means fine tip for left handed writer.

 

The logo appearing between Böhler and Glorex, means H B for Hermann Böhler, the company boss.

 

There were three ranges in Böhler production. Original Böhler, top, Böhler Gold, medium, and Böhler Glorex the cheaper one. Allround good pens.

 

Degussa nibs can be very good steel plus chromium nibs with flex. Better to dispose of a good steel/chrom nib than of a 24 cts pure nail ! By the way, gold Degussa nibs are among the best gold nbs troughout the world production, I mean if you are fond of flex.

 

Satisfied ?

 

I am presently looking for a Böhler Gold or Glorex number 28, the bigger one, 5,3 inches long and rather thick. If ever you come to hear of one for sale, please contact me on bousserez.francois@orange.fr

That would be very nice of you.

 

Best whishes for Christmas eve !

 

François

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Dear François,

 

Thank you for the information. I'll let you know if I ever encounter the number 28 model.

 

Now to decide what to do - it is a lovely pen, and I would like to keep it for myself, but the left-handed nib suggests that it may be better off with my left-handed brother....

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Hi Francois

Are you sure? I always thought that "L" means "linksschräg" LY or left oplique. This could be a nib for right handers in correlation to your hand angle

>>There were three ranges in Böhler production. Original Böhler, top, Böhler Gold, medium, and Böhler Glorex the cheaper one<<....... Where did you get such informationes from???

The DEGUSSA nib is original.

Kind Regards

Thomas

Edited by Kaweco
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Osmia did things like BBL, for BB left footed...ie for right handers. Boehler is the brother that split from this firm in '38. So FL could be well Fine Left footed oblique.

Osmia/Boehler were more exact of what foot the oblique was than other companies I have from that era like MB or Pelikan or later Geha to exactly which Oblique the pen was.

 

My Böhler Gold, are quite good pens...at least as good as the then Osmia...used the same model number.

I had thought the Gold the higher class....but I have only superficial knowledge of Boelher.

 

Degussa was making Osmia nibs since 1932 when they bought up Osmia's nib factory...in Osmia not having an office supply company behind it like Soennecken, MB, Pelikan and later Geha was always broke.

I have found Osmia and there for Degussa to make steel nibs as good as gold nibs.

 

I was once more ignorant than now about nibs....somehow thinking only in house nibs any good. I had a couple old Degussa and Bock nibs back when I was a 'noobie', and it was pure luck I didn't throw away those good nibs because I was so ignorant.

Another good nib is the Rupp with a lion on it.

Rupp...started @ 1922 like Osmia, and Rupp and Degussa stopped making nibs in @ 1970.

All three were Heidelberg companies.

Bock started in 1938....and is one of the major nib makers in the world.

 

I keep forgetting who made the Bison nibs....I do have a pen with one on it, and the nib is good.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Boehler Gold ... pens.

First year split....a '38 Boehler Gold...non-Degussa nib....gold washed, so was ordered from outside Germany, in in the Summer of 38 Hitler stole all the gold. Tortoise.

Having bought the pen, took the pictures as bought also.

http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o707/boboolson1/F7n6tDyIMsZj1282498401S_zps6alftcri.jpg

 

http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o707/boboolson1/3peCUqOKR1A01282498390S_zpsngdo0mlm.jpghttp://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o707/boboolson1/ZL6RrVDHwYC11282498416S_zpsz4g0ib8v.jpg

 

A couple of other Boehler Gold level pens....and they are higher class than the 'regular' Osmia I have....well, the clips are better. I do have some BCHR Osmia also.(I had not expected to own any Chased black rubber pens, then they seemed to rain down on me.)

I don't have a spiderweb window on my Osmia's.....one must realize I only have about 8-9 of both total, so am not an expert.

Boehler used the same model number as was on the Osmia pens.

http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o707/boboolson1/B0ijipgEWkKGrHqMOKiUETrJ6spBMvK46y_3_zpsv4xkmvrm.jpg

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Thanks all, for generous sharing of information.

 

Bo Bo, that spiderweb window is gorgeous. I have yet to find a pen in person that has such an ink window, though, and I've been keeping my eyes open.

Also, what do you use to polish your pens (they've come out really nicely)?

 

An update on my Böhler Glorex. The pen came with the original cork still fitted (and the pen very dirty). After some mild cleaning and about 6 weeks of having the barrel constantly filled with water, I've concluded that the cork that is still fitted with the pen is OK. I inked it up this evening and it seems to write rather well (and I can confirm that "FL" does indeed seem to indicate left-footed oblique fine, at least on my pen). I'm using Pelikan 4001 Royal Blue, as I do pretty much as standard when I'm trying out an old pen for the first time.

 

It's quite a relief that the cork is still intact, as I have yet to successfully make a replacement cork, that fits properly, for another pen that I have. I really enjoy finding beaten up old pens and playing around with them, but I still have so much to learn...

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Zombie corks...need to be soaked for at least a week, and not the one or two days I thought at first.

 

They came that way....didn't have to polish at all. I've another two Osmia's that good.

I also have a war BCHR one that needs a lot of cleaning (semi-chrome is what I use).....after re-corking.

It was not over priced. :headsmack: :unsure:...unfortunately it is too small to be used for repair parts on the big Boehler.

 

The smaller pen is still fine....the larger one with the spiderweb inkwindow....just fell apart...first with a crack in the barrel, then the section just split hugely. Well they are pre-war.

Having quit smoking....there is a chance to save money to get it repaired.

 

I need to recork that smaller pen....zombie pens must be kept watered or the cork really dies the second time.

 

I have enough cork to start a factory. I have paraffin and beeswax. Some day as soon as I finish writing the western....and while cutting. I can clear my desk and re-cork.

 

Peter Twydle in England will cut cork to fit your pen....not cheap but cut to your size.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Thomas, I assume those are pictures from your collection in your fountain pen museum in Handschueheim? I've loaded the battery's of my camera.

I hope to make it there over the holidays.

 

Some very beautiful pens. :drool: :notworthy1: :thumbup: :puddle:

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Good, Thomas, I will be there second Sunday of January.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Oh, what lovely specimens, Kaweco! Thanks for sharing.

 

Bo Bo, thanks for the hint: I'll make sure to keep my refreshed-zombie-corked pen filled with water.

 

Thanks also for the tip about Peter Twydle. I might have to resort to getting him to someone else to make a cork for me, but I really want to get it right myself. This is not only because I have several pens needing corks and it would get very expensive to have all the necessary corks made; I very much want to learn to do this kind of repair for myself. I'm not in a rush, and I'm sure I'll get it right at some point. My most recent attempt was almost right, so it's just a question of time...

 

I actually have another Böhler - a small, thin Bögler Original with tortoise finish (very similar in looks to the first individual picture in Kaweco's series). It definitely needs a new cork, but there I have yet to work out how to get to the inside of the barrel. Again, no rush.

 

(I presume Handschueheim is somewhere in southern Germany; too bad for me.)

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Hi everyone here !


I feel ashamed of my mistaking. You are right: L means left footed oblique (links auf Deutsch), so Stephanos L nib is for right handlers. :wub:

I had read the explanation I have given him a day or so before I discovered his post. And the one who had wrtitten this seemed sure of him. But I have since read what you metioned to carrect my fail. :wub: :wub:


About Degussa nibs, I have read two versions of the story. First one saying that Degussa nibs belongued to the Böhler Brothers, or at least one of the two, I think Hermann, the reason why Böhler pens sporrted most of the time ths nib brand. Second one,is mentioned here, and saying that Degussa bought the Osmia machines to make nibs when finance was bad at a point of its history.


I think I have read all this on German posts or articles. I should have been less affimative anyway, sorry again.


By the way, I am still looking for a Böhler Glorex, the bigger model, ca 5,3 inches long with # 8 steel Degussa nib. I am not shure of the number. One equiped with a gold or pallag nib would certainly be too expansive for my purse or wallet. I am retired and make a linving on a light as a feather pension, but nuts for pens since my youth !


If one of you has my grail hidden in a drawer and would consider possible to separate, be sure that the pen would be welcomed, cherished and closely cared of.


I have come many times on FPN before my last registration. I love to read your posts, learn a lot about pens and their histoty, caracteristics, and can stare for hours at the splendid pens exposed, like the ones in this post. :yikes: :yikes: :) :) :D



Thanks to all for welcoming me as you do, and for the pleasure you have given and give me dayly.


Cheers !

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............

About Degussa nibs, I have read two versions of the story. First one saying that Degussa nibs belongued to the Böhler Brothers, or at least one of the two, I think Hermann, the reason why Böhler pens sporrted most of the time ths nib brand. Second one,is mentioned here, and saying that Degussa bought the Osmia machines to make nibs when finance was bad at a point of its history.
................

Hello Francois

Be welcome and do not hesitate to make questions! Yes there are some versiones about Osmia, DEGUSSA, Faber and Hermann Böhler. But you can trust the following version touching upon DEGUSSA.

I have the primary sources:

Parker made up a joint venture with Georg and Hermann Böhler (“Osmia”) in 1928 under the name “Parker – Osmia” and took over the business totally in 1929 under the name “Parker AG Heidelberg”. But the incorporation crashed and was terminated by a contract 1930 – 24 – 2. Parker left Osmia AG with a minimum of joint stocks and they had to fulfill the long lasting guarantees of the sold Parker- Osmia writing articles. But the Osmia AG crashed again and went to bankrupt in summer 1932.

A short time later they opened again under the name “Osmia GmbH” because the DEGUSSA made a loan agreement. One of the DEGUSSA`s daughter plants in Pforzheim had been the source for gold sheets for making gold nibs, gold fillings and other precious metals for the fountain pen industries. (DEGUSSA = German gold and silver extracting establishment). A terminated Osmia would have been a loss of a lucrative business partner. For the loan the Osmia gave the nib manufacturing to the DEGUSSA. They did not leave their home plant in Dossenheim because 20 special nib workers would have been forced to move to Pforzheim.

DEGUSSA built up new production rooms and had in the end 125 employed people in 1990 who produced 500,000 gold nibs and 11 million steel nibs per year. After a very small collapse they moved back to Hanau. Mutschler (“Reform”) took over the nib production until they went bankrupt in 2003.

http://i844.photobucket.com/albums/ab1/Thomasnr/Mutschler_zps3046ec67.jpg

 

Then Bock took the nib making capacities.

Kind Regards

Thomas

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Very inbteresting, Thomas, many thanks ! It's a pleasure to be here. People are so nice and there is so much to learn about the subject of one of my main passions.

 

In the part of France where I am now retired, there a moto which says :

 

" The old woman did not want to die cause she learned more every day. "

 

A whole life is not enough to learn all what is to be known about the fountain pens subject !

Fortunately !

 

Cheers !

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Thomas is a scholar. I have listened to him for hours at the local flea market....

This is more detailed Info than I had from what I read and misheard listening to Thomas.

 

To learn something....one has to have an idea in the first place to build on. About all I remembered was Rupp and Degussa stopped making pens @ 1970xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx that was wrong by 20 years.

All I knew was the original workers refused to move half way across Germany or 75 km to Pfhortzheim in 1932. That was moving out of the neighborhood, away from family support and a major risk....much like America before WW2. Pfortzheim was full of strangers no one knew.

 

You would not believe how many ways I've learned to misspell Mutschler (“Reform”)...Americans often learn 'English' with out learning phonetics.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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So beautiful your B¨hler pens, Thomas !!! :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:

I stare at them at least once a day and water comes to my mouth...

I think of the one I'm deeply in love with, the bigger one all in black with a #8 steel Degussa nib... I am suppose to meet one next week. A nice guy seems to have found one.in his family... I'll introduce you all to this austere big boy ! I'll have to find some Schnaps to welcome him !

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  • 2 years later...

 

Dear Thomas,

I came very late to the "party" about Bohler (just today) and am curious about your pictures.

Is there any chance you can re-post your pictures here.

 

I'm just a beginner in the vintage pens (just 6 months) and am fascinated by the history and quality (nib quality, pen make, etc).

Thanks in advance and wishing you all a great new year ahead

Ryan

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