Jump to content

Pelikan 100 Solid Gold


northstar

Recommended Posts

I bought this pen from a dear friend sometimes back, but it was delievered to me last week, I was not able to find much information about this pen online, so wanted to share few pictures with all of you, if anyone got some information about this pen I will appreciate.

 

http://s5.postimg.org/mhzgmoycn/Pelikan100a.jpg

http://s5.postimg.org/k1xn8ug9z/Pelikan100b.jpg

http://s5.postimg.org/mxaqfpk9z/Pelikan100c.jpg

http://s5.postimg.org/xy5vkqciv/Pelikan100d.jpg

http://s5.postimg.org/q6p5m68dj/Pelikan100e.jpg

http://s5.postimg.org/wlo6iuf3b/Pelikan100f.jpg

http://s5.postimg.org/74adczmqv/Pelikan100g.jpg

Best regards.

Edited by northstar

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 16
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • northstar

    7

  • rustynib

    2

  • Bo Bo Olson

    2

  • sargetalon

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

What a beautiful pen, thank you for sharing!

...............................................................

We Are Our Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The real guys will know! But from the clip, the end logo, and the shape, I'm guessing an M30 from the 60's done in solid gold! Yipes!!

 

 

A later entry with tail between legs.

 

Well, I wasn't wrong on at least getting the look of the M30 right. But as Rusty points out and proves with the actual model listings, the M30 done in gold was dubbed the M100!.

 

Thanks Rusty and Sargetalon for the explanations!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a beautiful, beautiful pen, and it's clearly of that era (as per Dickkooty2).

Congratulations on a work of art that that should give you many years of writing pleasure.

 

 

Now for a bit of nerdiness...

 

I have a Mk20, a Mk30, a Pelikan 20 Silvexa, and a Pelikan 60 rolled gold. I also have a metal-bodied cartridge-filler (no idea of the model).

These five models all look exactly the same, at first glance - but there are two differences: size (length) and nib-shape.

 

Nib:

The Mk20, Mk30 and the Silvexa all have the same nib, which looks just like that on your Pelikan 100.

The cartridge-filler and the Pelikan 60 have the same shape of nib as each other, which is different from yours.

 

Length:

The Mk20 and Mk30 are the same size as one another (134mm, capped).

The Silvexa, the 60 and the metal-bodied cartridge-filler are the same size as one another (132mm); very slightly shorter than the Mk20 and Mk30.

 

What does this suggest about your specific pen?

My guess is that the Mk20 and Mk30 are earlier models (I'm sure I've seen a Mk10 somewhere), and that the 60 and metal body are a later design. I'd guess that the Silvexa is somewhere in-between; a transitional model between the earlier design (same nib as on the Mk20&30) and the updated design (same size as the 60 and the cartridge pen). The plastic on the Silvexa feels slightly lighter than the plastic of the other two plastic bodied pens; the Mk20 and Mk30.

 

If forced to bet, I'd say that your pen is the pinnacle of the earlier pens (i.e., rounds off the Mk10, 20, 30 series) and thus predict that it is of the larger size. I haven't looked, but the ruettinger website is often a good source on Pelikans.

 

So that you can see what I'm talking about, here is a photo of these five pens - apologies for the poor image quality. From bottom-to-top:

1. Metal cartridge-filler (unknown model, very light), steel nib

2. Pelikan 20 Silvexa, 14k nib

3. Mk20 (silver-coloured trim), 14k nib

4. Mk30 (gold trim), 14k nib

5. Pelikan 60 rolled gold, 18k nib

fpn_1474229103__1960spelis_mk2030etc.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your informative comments and great pictures, the writing on the cap clearly says Pelikan 100 (2nd & 5th pictures show it clearly).

 

Best regards.

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Christof.

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:notworthy1: :thumbup:

 

How's the nib....semi-flex or regular flex?

 

I ask that in no one ever mentioned that back when chasing semi-flex so I stayed away from spade nibs.

Since then I've discovered there are an occasional semi-flex spade nib.

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:notworthy1: :thumbup:

 

How's the nib....semi-flex or regular flex?

 

I ask that in no one ever mentioned that back when chasing semi-flex so I stayed away from spade nibs.

Since then I've discovered there are an occasional semi-flex spade nib.

Hello Bo Bo :)

 

I had to go through your signature trying to find what a regular flex means ;) I will assume it means flex, I think the nib for the pen is a semi flex to flex, some where in between.

 

Best regards.

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi northstar,

 

 

It is a m100 14ct gold guilloche made from 2/1966 until 7/1970. :)

 

rusty

Thank you for the great information rusty :)

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beautiful pen. If I recall correctly, they didn't make a lot of these M100 gold guilloche pens. A fine addition to any flock. Congrats!

PELIKAN - Too many birds in the flock to count. My pen chest has proven to be a most fertile breeding ground.

fpn_1508261203__fpn_logo_300x150.jpg

THE PELIKAN'S PERCH - A growing reference site for all things Pelikan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beautiful pen. If I recall correctly, they didn't make a lot of these M100 gold guilloche pens. A fine addition to any flock. Congrats!

Thank you sargetalon, yes it seems there are very few of this available.

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad your spade nib, is a maxi-semi-flex.

I ran into a Mulscher(sp) cheap Reform with a maxi-semi-flex spade nib and a MB I saw but din't buy at a live auction.... but also ran into a 3XX MB spade nib that was a nail. All spade nibs I tested at flea markets were nails....so out side my Dupont never bought any...

As I mentioned, in no one was bragging their semi-flex spade nibs...I couldn't afford to gamble so didn't.

 

I use a 1/2 & 1/2 pressure system that works for me....All the way out to Superflex, to Wet Noodle and past. In Superflex it's only a 'noobie's guide in the more superflex nibs one has the less defining one can actually do. But it lets 'noobies' and folks with lesser amounts of spuerflex be close enough for horseshoes.

 

If one mashes a semi-vintage or vintage 'true' regular flex (or a 200), a tine spread of 3 X a light stroke, a semi-flex needs only half that pressure to reach 3 X tine spread a light line.

Maxi-semi-flex half of that, or 1/4th the pressure needed to mash a 'true' regular flex to a 3 X time spread.

(This is not a superflex in it has a 3X tine limit & the first stage of Superflex....Easy Full Flex needs half that pressure to spread it's tines 4-5-6 or in rare cases 7X a light down stroke. 1/8th the pressure needed to mash a 'true' regular flex to 3 X.

 

I would guess your pen has a maxi-semi-flex nib. It's not marked and I have pens like a 400 with both, a 400n that is only semi-flex and a 400nn that is maxi....along with an Ibis and a 500. You picked your nib at the corner pen shop. One could get a Hard H nib, or a nails Nail the D, or semi-flex or maxi-semi-flex............regular flex was on the the school pen...120, who's nib fit a 400.

 

The only pen company that differentiates clearly, is Osmia...the nib with a number in a Diamond is semi-flex, Supra is maxi-semi-flex.

 

'True' Regular flex, semi-flex and maxi-semi-flex are all in the 3 X tine spread set...and should not be pushed beyond that.

 

Works for Superflex too but that's not needed here.

 

I keep calling 'old' regular flex, 'true' regular flex....in that was a flex that was often used by most pen makers....Pelikan's 120 and 200's are 'true' regular flex. Many companies, including Pelikan out side of the 200, now have semi-nail instead of regular flex like in their 400/600. Too many ham fisted cross over Ball Point Barbarians, bent too many nibs...so to save repair costs regular flex was replaced by semi-nail....of course with out telling anyone..... :( of course.

 

Some folks coming over from nail and semi-nail....like a P-75 or the modern 400/600 run into 'true' regular flex the first time and think it's semi-flex...it's not. It's a nice springy ride with a touch of tine spread if one is a bit heavy handed.

 

I use to be a semi-flex snob... :o :rolleyes: , but have come to like the 'true' regular flex nib in depending on ink and paper often is a better shading nib, in it is a bit dryer than semi&maxi.

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad your spade nib, is a maxi-semi-flex.

 

Thank you for such a detailed explanation Bo Bo :)

 

Best regards.

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

Snailmail3.png Snail Mail 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      43844
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      33550
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. inkstainedruth
      inkstainedruth
      26720
    5. jar
      jar
      26101
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Shanghai Knife Dude
      I have the Sailor Naginata and some fancy blade nibs coming after 2022 by a number of new workshop from China.  With all my respect, IMHO, they are all (bleep) in doing chinese characters.  Go use a bush, or at least a bush pen. 
    • A Smug Dill
      It is the reason why I'm so keen on the idea of a personal library — of pens, nibs, inks, paper products, etc. — and spent so much money, as well as time and effort, to “build” it for myself (because I can't simply remember everything, especially as I'm getting older fast) and my wife, so that we can “know”; and, instead of just disposing of what displeased us, or even just not good enough to be “given the time of day” against competition from >500 other pens and >500 other inks for our at
    • adamselene
      Agreed.  And I think it’s good to be aware of this early on and think about at the point of buying rather than rationalizing a purchase..
    • A Smug Dill
      Alas, one cannot know “good” without some idea of “bad” against which to contrast; and, as one of my former bosses (back when I was in my twenties) used to say, “on the scale of good to bad…”, it's a spectrum, not a dichotomy. Whereas subjectively acceptable (or tolerable) and unacceptable may well be a dichotomy to someone, and finding whether the threshold or cusp between them lies takes experiencing many degrees of less-than-ideal, especially if the decision is somehow influenced by factors o
    • adamselene
      I got my first real fountain pen on my 60th birthday and many hundreds of pens later I’ve often thought of what I should’ve known in the beginning. I have many pens, the majority of which have some objectionable feature. If they are too delicate, or can’t be posted, or they are too precious to face losing , still they are users, but only in very limited environments..  I have a big disliking for pens that have the cap jump into the air and fly off. I object to Pens that dry out, or leave blobs o
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files






×
×
  • Create New...