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Is My Platinum 3776 Faulty Or It Is Expected?


kenpurpur
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I am having the exact same problem with my Platinum Century 3776 Chartres Blue SF (uf, what a long name). I am afraid of trying to solve the problem myself and voiding the warranty. I wrote the seller and we will see how it goes. It is indeed such a pitty because I love what the Chartres Blue pen represents.

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I have used a #3776 SF for a few years continuously with Platinum blue black for work and in that time it has become more generous with ink flow but has always been very responsive to pressure. With no pressure I used to get an almost EF line, going to a line that was somewhere between a (Platinum) fine and medium with a bit of 'dynamic' writing. On looking though it is mostly ink flow that made the difference, not tine spread. Now the pen writes with more of a typical fine line with no pressure, I think for the mileage it has done - it's not been adjusted and I don't lean on or flex my nibs.

 

It's not a flexy nib but a soft one as per the designation and I think Platinum maybe intentionally tunes them from new with a tight tine gap to allow for variation of pressure and tine movement in use. My #3776 fine by comparison is not quite as dry with no pressure but nothing like as wet when a little pressure is used.

 

I have found all Platinums to be very intolerant of slight tine misalignment where with some other nib grinds it may not be so noticeable. When you get a Platinum nib alignment right, you know it's there. In 8 platinum nibs I've never needed or wanted to smooth one and only 1 arrived to me with slight misalignment.

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It may come good, my one has with a few flushes. As someone mentioned before it may just need to soak in - run it in abit, I know its frustrating. I played around with the adjustments slightly but I do not recommend this method. I don't think I made it come good with my adjusting as I did not see any immediate results but after some time its come good. It isn't as wet as the Fine 3776 but its smoother slightly, or maybe because it just writes differently. :wacko:

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Thanks for this post. I'm having some issues with this pen as well.

 

Here is a picture of what things look like:

post-135544-0-23741900-1494263954_thumb.jpg

 

So, I think there may be a few things at play:

 

1. I'm really not pushing it that much and I'm wondering if even if a little is too much

 

2. It gets dry quickly- and when it gets dry, when I flip it over, and press the nib, then it starts writing again. Does this mean that there is too much space between the tine and the feed?

 

3. Does the ink make a difference, its too bad, but I can test this some more.

 

I'm thinking about returning this for a Medium

 

 

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My UEF is also frustratingly dry. The problem's so bad, I can't even sit and think with the pen uncapped for longer than ten seconds without the ink drying up completely. I've not yet tried spreading the tines with shims, but I've tried everything else. In some ways it's comforting to know others are having the exact same problems.

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Thanks for this post. I'm having some issues with this pen as well.

 

Here is a picture of what things look like:

attachicon.gifsf.jpg

 

So, I think there may be a few things at play:

 

1. I'm really not pushing it that much and I'm wondering if even if a little is too much

 

2. It gets dry quickly- and when it gets dry, when I flip it over, and press the nib, then it starts writing again. Does this mean that there is too much space between the tine and the feed?

 

3. Does the ink make a difference, its too bad, but I can test this some more.

 

I'm thinking about returning this for a Medium

 

 

 

 

My SF is soft but not as flexible as you are using yours. I could be wrong but I think you are pushing yours too hard and forcing the nib too far away from the feed. Remember Platinum specializes in hard nibs and this is the only soft nib supplied in a 3776 Century. If you switch to a medium it will be a hard nib, but I expect it will be much wetter.

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My SF is soft but not as flexible as you are using yours. I could be wrong but I think you are pushing yours too hard and forcing the nib too far away from the feed. Remember Platinum specializes in hard nibs and this is the only soft nib supplied in a 3776 Century. If you switch to a medium it will be a hard nib, but I expect it will be much wetter.

Yes, thank you this is very helpful...this is my first Platinum and I thought it would offer a bit more flex...I will keep playing with it and may just return it for a medium. Do you think the ink makes a difference?

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My UEF is also frustratingly dry. The problem's so bad, I can't even sit and think with the pen uncapped for longer than ten seconds without the ink drying up completely. I've not yet tried spreading the tines with shims, but I've tried everything else. In some ways it's comforting to know others are having the exact same problems.

https://www.jetpens.com/blog/guide-to-fountain-pen-nibs-troubleshooting-tips-and-tricks/pt/777

I like this guide to guide me in tinkering with my nibs.

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Yes, thank you this is very helpful...this is my first Platinum and I thought it would offer a bit more flex...I will keep playing with it and may just return it for a medium. Do you think the ink makes a difference?

 

Yes ink can make a difference but from your picture I would think your ink is wet enough.

 

In any case maybe more of an expert will chime in. I am not a flex expert...

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Yes, thank you this is very helpful...this is my first Platinum and I thought it would offer a bit more flex...I will keep playing with it and may just return it for a medium. Do you think the ink makes a difference?

Yes, you are abusing the nibs. Please stop it. Even the soft nibs are not meant to be flexed.

 

My Website

 

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Yes, you are abusing the nibs. Please stop it. Even the soft nibs are not meant to be flexed.

I really didn't think I was pressing that hard - I think it looks like with consistent pressure the nib superstars from the feed causing the stop in flow. I looked at videos online and from much of what I read it looked like the pen needed some pressure to get the line variation...

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I really didn't think I was pressing that hard - I think it looks like with consistent pressure the nib superstars from the feed causing the stop in flow. I looked at videos online and from much of what I read it looked like the pen needed some pressure to get the line variation...

It's not supposed to give line variation.

 

Don't believe the videos online. There are maybe a dozen folk that actually have a clue about flex nibs and they don't do videos. Almost all the videos simply show abuse.

 

My Website

 

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It's not supposed to give line variation.

 

Don't believe the videos online. There are maybe a dozen folk that actually have a clue about flex nibs and they don't do videos. Almost all the videos simply show abuse.

What is the purpose of the SF - am thinking of returning for a M or B. What do you like about the SF if I may ask...

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It's not supposed to give line variation.

 

Don't believe the videos online. There are maybe a dozen folk that actually have a clue about flex nibs and they don't do videos. Almost all the videos simply show abuse.

 

Wow! This statement is very revealing!

 

What is the purpose of the SF - am thinking of returning for a M or B. What do you like about the SF if I may ask...

 

I am eager to know its purpose too. Please enlighten us jar.

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My SF is soft but not as flexible as you are using yours. I could be wrong but I think you are pushing yours too hard and forcing the nib too far away from the feed. Remember Platinum specializes in hard nibs and this is the only soft nib supplied in a 3776 Century. If you switch to a medium it will be a hard nib, but I expect it will be much wetter.

 

I'm thinking of following your advise - would you recommend M over B??

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Ditto jar's post.

 

If you're seeking line variation then 3776 or Pilot fine point or soft fine, (not soft flex), is not the nib for you.

My Fine is very fine, zero variation, the medium, all but zero variation, both require a relaxed light hand, super smooth competent performers straight out of the box.

 

If you use a fine trim paint brush, one to cut in exacting thin trim lines, forcing it to white-wash a picket fence, or paint a wall, you're using the wrong tool for the job, and the brush by design for light detail edging work is damaged by unusual force. (your thin to thick, then railroading lines reveal this issue).

 

Investigate an italic nib or variant that performs successfully without unnecessary force. Perhaps this could be an option using the medium or B???

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The purpose of the 'Soft' nibs is to make the feel of the pen touching the paper softer. The tines are designed to bend upwards slightly, but not outwards.

fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif




“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.


And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”


Granny Aching

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It's not supposed to give line variation.

 

Don't believe the videos online. There are maybe a dozen folk that actually have a clue about flex nibs and they don't do videos. Almost all the videos simply show abuse.

 

Yep. You want flex get a dip pen - Zebra G or Nikko G, get the attachment (.20c) for extra ink and flex all you want. SF pens, Pilot Falcon and FA nib - are just soft, bouncy.

Dont forget these Japanese pens are more accomodated for East Asian script which isnt curvy.

 

You may have to soak the nib overnight to get it going better, seems Platinum have made a few lately that are dry SF writers out of the box.

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Looking at the photo showing 'railroading' it is a clear case of the nib parting with the feed because the pressure on the nib is too great. I don't think mine would give that much line width after constant use for several years so don't think you have a bad one, it's just not meant to do what you are trying to achieve.

 

Reiterating what's written by others, this nib is all about the tactile feel on the page which is quite different to the normal fine/ medium etc platinum nibs. They are very firm and will not yield to pressure so won't give you any real line variation.

 

One of the differences between this SF nib and a flex nib is the way the nib tines move; when you bear down on the platinum SF, the whole of the nib tines move away from the feed, almost back to the breather which is where the 'hinge' of the movement is on this nib. This also results in the tines splaying a bit so you do initially get more ink and a wider line - until the little ink in the underside of the nib is exhausted. The feed wasn't designed to provide as much ink continuously as this requires.

If you look at a vintage flex nib working, the movement in the tines is nearer the tipping; you get more of a curve/ gradual bend in the tines which leaves a lot more of the underside of the nib, especially near the breather hole in contact with the feed. The geometry of the movement also splays the tine ends more, rather than lifting them straight back so you get much more line width change for a given amount of lift away from the feed.

 

This elastic characteristic is generally not present in modern fountain pen 'flex' nibs but especially not in the Platinum soft nibs because they were likely conceived with Asian writing in mind as Mrpink says which tends to be a lot more like downward brush strokes. The yielding feel is apparent without bearing down enough to create line variation, what you will see though is a bit more flow where your writing style naturally adds a little weight.

 

I've not tried one as I'm not into flex but I've heard of and seen good results from the dip nib/ fountain pen combinations that are quite widely reviewed - even available online pre- converted. I'm thinking of a Jinhao x450 with Zebra G.

 

Not sure what the rules are with external links - I'm not affiliated with this site:

http://www.calligraphynut.com/jinhao-x450-flex-hack/

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What is the purpose of the SF - am thinking of returning for a M or B. What do you like about the SF if I may ask...

It is a matter of feel. Soft nibs will feel slightly springy when used. They require a lighter hand than "hard" nibs, super light hand and with no pressure at all.

 

They will require you to write slower and are best used in short strokes as opposed to continuous cursive writing though even that is possible with practice.

 

My Website

 

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