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Nib Length Comparison


TassoBarbasso
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Hi Guys!

 

I've recently realized that when choosing a pen, the size of the nib is an important criterion. it's difficult however to find a nice chart that compares the length of nibs available on some pens. I'm talking here about the visible part of the nib, because let's face it, after all, that's the only part we care about :D So here are a few picture that can help (sorry for the crappy quality, I took them with my phone). Bear in mind: one square is 5 mm, while the lines are set at 1 mm distance from one another.

 

Batch 1: Very small nibs

 

1. Venustas Schreiber (2-3 mm)

2. Lamy 2000 (6-7 mm);

3. Pilot capless/vanishing point (7-8 mm);

4. Parker 25 (1.2 cm);

5. Kaweko Sport vintage (1.3 cm);

6. Waterman 92 (1.8 cm);

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsza9dhxbq.jpeg?t=1453030210

 

Batch 2: Small nibs

 

1. Lamy standard nib (1.75 cm);

2. Jinhao standard nib (1.85 cm);

3. Jean Pierre Lepine steel nib (JoWo? Not sure about that) (1.9 cm);

4. Waterman LeMan 100 (1.9 cm);

5. 1905 Waterman eyedropper, 2-size nib (1.9 cm)

6. OMAS A.M. 87 small size (2 cm)

7. Warranted nib on an Osmia-Faber Castell (2.1 cm)

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpszphis40j.jpeg

 

Batch 3: More small nibs!

 

1. OMAS vintage Extra Lucens Lady size (1.75 cm);

2. Hero Fude nib (1.9 cm);

3. Parker duofold oblique (1.9 cm);

4. Minerva (OMAS) vintage nib (2 cm);

5. Cross Century II (1.9 cm);

6. Faber Castell Ambition, JoWo nib? (1.9 cm);

7. Faber Castell Ondoro, JoWo nib? (2 cm)

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsbwyucihe.jpeg

 

Batch 4: Medium sized nibs

 

1. Marlen XXI century (2.1 cm)

2. Pilot custom kaede, n.10 size (2.2 cm)

3. Platinum Music Nib (2.25 cm)

4. Aurora Optima (2.35 cm)

5. Aurora Dante Inferno (2.35 cm)

6. Aurora 18k nib (2.4 cm)

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpshwtfznsd.jpeg

 

Batch 5: more medium-sized nibs

 

1. Delta 14k small nib (2.05 cm);

2. Pilot custom 74, n. 5 (2 cm);

3. Pilot Nippon Art Maki-e, n.5 (2 cm);

4. Marlene Vitis (2.05 cm);

5. Waterman Carene (2.05 cm);

6. Montblanc 234 1/2 (2.05 cm);

7.Esterbrook standard nib (2.25 cm).

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsgflz4npi.jpeg

 

Batch 6: Medium-to-large sized nib

 

1. Parker Duofold Mosaic (2.05 cm)

2. Sailor Zoom nib (2.1 cm)

3. Pelikan 100 (2.2 cm)

4. Pineider green ebonite, Bock nib (2.35 cm)

5. OMAS Society (2.4 cm)

6. OMAS Arte Italiana celluloid (2.4 cm)

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsyvzufqen.jpeg

 

Batch 7: Large nibs

 

1. Conklin modern nib, Bock manufacture (2.3 cm)

2. OMAS Goya limited edition (2.4 cm)

3. Marlen Art Nouveau (2.4 cm)

4. Pilot falcon nib on a Pilot 743, n. 15 (2.4 cm)

5. Visconti Van Gogh oversize, old series, Bock manufacture (2.5 cm)

6. Pilot custom 845, n. 15 nib (2.45 cm)

7. Montblanc 149 (2.8 cm)

 

http://i1309.photobucket.com/albums/s633/Tasso-Barbasso/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsgobxtmsa.jpeg

 

hope this helps! :)

cheers,

Fabio

Edited by TassoBarbasso
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Tasso, you created an extremely useful resource. Thank you!

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Tasso, you created an extremely useful resource. Thank you!

 

Thanks!

 

Maybe the moderators could pin this post?

 

Everyone, feel free to add your own measurements! :)

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Can you post those photo's to the little green box...I can't see them.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Can you post those photo's to the little green box...I can't see them.

 

which little green box? You mean the "image" link button between the "link" and "code" one?

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I congratulate you on a very interesting post. :thumbup:

 

Thank you! I really hope this can be useful for others as well. I've always loved to look at pictures of nib size comparisons, but they are usually comparisons among nibs of the same brand, and very often, they compare the entire nib's length, including the part that remains inside the section. Personally for me it's not important how long's a nib overall. What matters is the part I can see.

 

I was a bit uncertain on how to measure inlaid nibs such as the Waterman Carene's one, but ultimately decided to measure all of the visible part.

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I see them now.

Yep...between the code and unlink/link buttons.

 

That is a very fine selection of pens. :thumbup: :notworthy1:

 

I do have a question on the Osmia-Faber-Castell nib....after Faber-Castell bought up Osmia @ 1950, for a long time they used the Osmia nib markings of Supra for the maxi-semi-flex and the Osmia Diamond mostly with a number in it for the semi-flex.

Mostly even late in the '50's as far as I know, they were still using the Osmia diamond even after having even erased Osmia from the nib and the rest of the pen. (There were other Osmia jewel caps and clips with out Osmia on them, even when it was Osmia only. The nibs still had Osmia on them of course.) In 1932, Osmia again broke, Degussa bought up the Osmia nib factory and continued to make nibs for Osmia with Osmia's markings. Degussa and Rupp (started 1922) closed down making nibs in @ 1970.

So I find a Warranted nib on an O-F-C a bit odd.

 

Faber-Castell (the pencil empire) making only second tier pens, had bought Osmia (starting in 1936 and taking over @ 1950, because it was a first tier pen maker. Then started erasing Osmia from the pen, the cap jewel, the clip, the name on the barrel and finally Osmia on the nib. :doh: Really a stupid egotistical thing to do.

 

Can you throw up a close up of that nib? Is there any Osmia markings on it? The Diamond?

Could it be a replacement nib.

Picture of the pen and a model number might help my curiosity. I do have some 7 Osmia and O-F-C pens.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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I see them now.

Yep...between the code and unlink/link buttons.

 

That is a very fine selection of pens. :thumbup: :notworthy1:

 

I do have a question on the Osmia-Faber-Castell nib....after Faber-Castell bought up Osmia @ 1950, for a long time they used the Osmia nib markings of Supra for the maxi-semi-flex and the Osmia Diamond mostly with a number in it for the semi-flex.

Mostly even late in the '50's as far as I know, they were still using the Osmia diamond even after having even erased Osmia from the nib and the rest of the pen. (There were other Osmia jewel caps and clips with out Osmia on them, even when it was Osmia only. The nibs still had Osmia on them of course.) In 1932, Osmia again broke, Degussa bought up the Osmia nib factory and continued to make nibs for Osmia with Osmia's markings. Degussa and Rupp (started 1922) closed down making nibs in @ 1970.

So I find a Warranted nib on an O-F-C a bit odd.

 

Faber-Castell (the pencil empire) making only second tier pens, had bought Osmia (starting in 1936 and taking over @ 1950, because it was a first tier pen maker. Then started erasing Osmia from the pen, the cap jewel, the clip, the name on the barrel and finally Osmia on the nib. :doh: Really a stupid egotistical thing to do.

 

Can you throw up a close up of that nib? Is there any Osmia markings on it? The Diamond?

Could it be a replacement nib.

Picture of the pen and a model number might help my curiosity. I do have some 7 Osmia and O-F-C pens.

 

I'm referring to a Faber-Castell-made pen made and marketed as "Progress England", with a Tudor rose on top. There's some background about this pen here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/107764-progress-pen-english-1930s-enamel-tudor-rose-at-top/ and the reconstruction of its history that solved the mystery here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/153228-help-mysterious-pen/

 

It's a lovely pen, but since it was made for the English market during a time of England-Germany tension in the late '30s, they removed anything that could remind of "Germany" ;) Including the nib, which is probably why they went for a "warranted" unmarked nib.

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I'm referring to a Faber-Castell-made pen made and marketed as "Progress England", with a Tudor rose on top. There's some background about this pen here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/107764-progress-pen-english-1930s-enamel-tudor-rose-at-top/ and the reconstruction of its history that solved the mystery here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/153228-help-mysterious-pen/

 

It's a lovely pen, but since it was made for the English market during a time of England-Germany tension in the late '30s, they removed anything that could remind of "Germany" ;) Including the nib, which is probably why they went for a "warranted" unmarked nib.

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I love this! As someone looking into getting a Pilot 912 in either an FA nib or a SFM nib, it is interesting to see such a big difference between the lengths!

Currently In Use :
Pilot Custom Heritage 91 (SFM) Diamine Wild Strawberry

TWSBI Diamond 580 (F) - Diamine Blue Velvet

Italix Parson's Essentials (F) - Diamine Tropical Green

LAMY Safari (F) - Noodler's Black

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Fine, with the Osmia pen...in then it was still Osmia, even with the '36 buy in...nothing changed in the pen. '38 the brothers spit the firm into Osmia and Boehler. My guess was Faber Castell was starting to stick the nose in. Someone that could know, said with out the war, Osmia would have not made it to the '50's. Boehler lasted into the 70's making school pens. They had some nice pens in the '30's.

 

The # in the Diamond was the nib size on the semi-flex nibs. I have seen a picture of #2, mine are 3's...my larger medium-large Osmia are Supra nibs with no number. I also have gold #3's and steel. The both are grand nibs, that are = in all ways.

 

I think it's a replacement nib, in Osmia's name was derived from Osmium, a hard rare earth discovered and developed for fountain pens tipping in 1922 by a Heidelberg professor. Osmia bought the patent from the Prof. And for a very long time Osmia; osmium tipping was some of the best in the world, so would not be removed from the nib, if they kept the Osmia on the barrel. In Osmia was the mark of a top quality nib, in tipping and the making.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Fine, with the Osmia pen...in then it was still Osmia, even with the '36 buy in...nothing changed in the pen. '38 the brothers spit the firm into Osmia and Boehler. My guess was Faber Castell was starting to stick the nose in. Someone that could know, said with out the war, Osmia would have not made it to the '50's. Boehler lasted into the 70's making school pens. They had some nice pens in the '30's.

 

The # in the Diamond was the nib size on the semi-flex nibs. I have seen a picture of #2, mine are 3's...my larger medium-large Osmia are Supra nibs with no number. I also have gold #3's and steel. The both are grand nibs, that are = in all ways.

 

I think it's a replacement nib, in Osmia's name was derived from Osmium, a hard rare earth discovered and developed for fountain pens tipping in 1922 by a Heidelberg professor. Osmia bought the patent from the Prof. And for a very long time Osmia; osmium tipping was some of the best in the world, so would not be removed from the nib, if they kept the Osmia on the barrel. In Osmia was the mark of a top quality nib, in tipping and the making.

 

Indeed, that could be a replacement nib. But it's SUCH a good nib :D It's flexible and at the same time italic oblique, without being too sharp. I would say it's probably in my top 3 best writers.

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There are some real fine Warranted nibs that are 'legendary' ... other just warrant that it is 14 K gold and otherwise are sort of mox nix nibs.

 

I have a warranted nib that needs tipping....some one clipped it off, but it's got some nice flex to it.

I'm glad the nib is so great.

Sigh, it's something that is forgotten when I do have money, to be remembered when I don't. I can even send it off to Spain and get it down 1/3 cheaper than sending it off to the States. Being retired means I'm not as forgetful as I use to be. :P

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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