Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Computer Nerd In Search Of Better Handwriting.


gamingoodz
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello there I'm 29 about to turn 30 this month and currently a student working towards my associates degree in Network Administration. I am on a computer all day long and I love computers and technology, but I also love the relaxing and personal nature of handwriting. When I went back to school I realized that my handwriting was horrible. Having used a computer so much and never handwriting anything I had lost any tiny amount of skill I might have had in the past. So I started a quest to improve my handwriting which lead me to fountain pens and my new addicting lol.

 

The thing is though I really do not know where to start. I've looked through plenty of threads and searched a good deal online but there are multiple styles of script and multiple resources so I'm a little overwhelmed. Also I just gained 2 penpals from the penpal thread but I'm afraid they won't even be able to read my letters, I figured it would be nice to handwrite letters to folks and that also might improve my writing but now I'm ashamed to even show them my writing.

 

I don't know what script to choose or what resources online to use to practice. I don't have money to buy practice books which I see recommended often. Spencerian script is nice but it is to "fancy" and I don't think it would suit everyday writing.

 

I need a suggestion on a good practical everyday cursive script that still looks nice and that has resources freely available online I can use to practice. If someone could help me out I would greatly appreciate it!

 

I debated even posting this image because I'm extremely embarrassed but I feel its important to show just how much work I really need.. Which is quite a lot..

 

post-126876-0-07081100-1452483331_thumb.jpg

The first step toward change is awareness. The second step is acceptance.

Nathaniel Branden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 17
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • torstar

    2

  • ac12

    2

  • gamingoodz

    2

  • KellyMcJ

    3

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Go to the Iampeth site

http://www.iampeth.com/rare-books

There are several to choose from

- Palmer

- Mills

- Champion

 

I think Mills and Champion are based on Palmer.

 

You will NEED to dedicate time and practice, and the more the better, 20-45 minutes a day, every day. So you can build the muscle memory to write with. And don't skip the excercises. I wrote a daily journal, to get me to write every day. Others have copied a book or other document.

As you practice, if you feel bad, and your hand and arm just do not want to work, STOP. You do not want to practice with bad/old habits. Rest a while then come back to see if your hand and arm are OK to write.

 

gud luk

Edited by ac12

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I concur with Kelly. I can read your script.

Bad is when I cannot read the script. Like what mine was before I relearned to write.

Edited by ac12

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not bad at all.... you can print your own practice paper. There used to be a software called graphpap by a french guy that is freeware and excellent

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It takes time and patience and a real desire to improve.

 

It can be done but it's not happening over night.

 

Let us know how you make out with it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I work with people raised under the system of colonial British handwriting and there is no way I can hope to achieve what was drilled into them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Repetition of exercises (ovals tilting left, right, center, figure eights, connected L's, connected E's, etc.) using a fountain pen or soft pencil (it helps to vary your writing tool) is a good way to achieve better control. Vary the size too, so you have control over that. I'm surprised by people on this forum who comment "my handwriting is large (or small)" as though it's out of their control. (Maybe I'm misunderstanding.) Gain control, train your muscle memory and doodle a lot.

 

Your handwriting is quite readable but with a deliberateness in it that is sure to relax as you gain fluency.

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the kind words and information. I can't seem to decide on a "style"? of cursive script. I looked at Spencerian and it of course is beautiful, but not practical. Then there is Palmer which there is lots of free resources to learn but to me it seems a little hard to read, so I'm not sure if its what I really want either. Maybe Zaner-Bloser would be what I am looking for? It seems Palmer is very popular but from the samples I've seen it looks a little harder to read like Spencerian is, the letters seem almost too flowy and sctretched. Both would be great for special occasions I think but for everyday writing in this day and age I want something that is a little easier to read. I'm not sure If I'm making any sense lol, I figure I could learn a more toned down cursive like Zaner-Bloser for everyday writing and then work in some fancier stuff when I want to write fancy. I would like to get a dip pen one day and learn some Spencerian or copperplate for special occasions but that is down the road some day.

Thanks again

The first step toward change is awareness. The second step is acceptance.

Nathaniel Branden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think zaner bloser might be what I learned in school. Honestly, neither is hard to read when you are used to seeing it, but the people who need to read what you wrote may not be used to seeing it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the kind words and information. I can't seem to decide on a "style"? of cursive script. I looked at Spencerian and it of course is beautiful, but not practical. Then there is Palmer which there is lots of free resources to learn but to me it seems a little hard to read, so I'm not sure if its what I really want either. Maybe Zaner-Bloser would be what I am looking for? It seems Palmer is very popular but from the samples I've seen it looks a little harder to read like Spencerian is, the letters seem almost too flowy and sctretched. Both would be great for special occasions I think but for everyday writing in this day and age I want something that is a little easier to read. I'm not sure If I'm making any sense lol, I figure I could learn a more toned down cursive like Zaner-Bloser for everyday writing and then work in some fancier stuff when I want to write fancy. I would like to get a dip pen one day and learn some Spencerian or copperplate for special occasions but that is down the road some day.

Thanks again

 

Your print handwriting is already very good! Your letter forms are regular, your spacing is great, legibility is perfect. To get a substantial improvement, start by changing the basis of your letters from a circle (a, d, g, q, p, b, etc.) to an oval. Add a slight slant, optionally, and practice words and sentences, particularly those that are full of such letters.

 

I tried to give you examples of what to change. I am not a handwriting expert, so take my advice with a grain of salt. Though this is not my personal style, I think you can easily change your print to match my examples, if you like them. However, let me emphasize the fact that your print is already great! Sure, there are people around here with beautiful cursive, which can be pretty intimidating, but you have nothing to worry about!

 

In the first row, I tried to reproduce your letters and give you an example of a very easy change (maybe improvement?), then I tried to rewrite some words from your original post using oval-based letter forms, and a slight slant. Those are neither cursive, nor italic letter forms, strictly speaking. They're meant to offer a quick and easy "fix." The joining of the letters is completely optional. Hope it makes sense.

 

24293795456_21fec393a4_o.jpg

---

Please, visit my website at http://www.acousticpens.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't seem to decide on a "style"? of cursive script. I looked at Spencerian and it of course is beautiful, but not practical. Then there is Palmer which there is lots of free resources to learn but to me it seems a little hard to read, so I'm not sure if its what I really want either. Maybe Zaner-Bloser would be what I am looking for? It seems Palmer is very popular but from the samples I've seen it looks a little harder to read like Spencerian is, the letters seem almost too flowy and sctretched...

 

You're coming from a different perspective; those who have read cursive all their lives can pretty easily decipher what you might consider hard-to-read script, including oddly-formed letters. This is a product of the brain's natural tendency to fill in the gaps. Don't worry about others when you choose a style, for two reasons: 1. Those who can read cursive will be able to read it; and 2. You'll probably modify it to your preferences over time anyway.

 

I agree with Akustyk; use ovals, they're a graceful form.

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your cursive looks fine to me, though I'm speaking as a fellow techie (though one about 10 years older than you are).

 

Practice, practice, practice is my best recommendation, to be honest. I haven't done anything with respect to exercises, but I have started writing a daily journal and I've noticed that my handwriting has slowly, but steadily, improved as a result.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And no one has suggested looking at italic handwriting ... It is, IMHO, the first handwriting that is used to repair handwriting problems. Download Briem's Handwriting Repair or order a copy of Getty/Dubay's Handwriting Now to see what can be done to improve one's hand.

 

Not that your hand is not clear, legible, and neat. Just that cursive is a fine hand but not for everyone.

 

Enjoy,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

AkustyK your... Hooked up print? What do you call that? Is beautiful!

 

Yes, indeed! Very pretty. Something I'd like to try.

 

But to me, if I can read someone's hand, it's fine. It doesn't have to be Palmer, Spencerian, or anything, just legible,

My other pen is a Montblanc and...

 

My other blog is a tumblr.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

AkustyK your... Hooked up print? What do you call that? Is beautiful!

 

Yes, indeed! Very pretty. Something I'd like to try.

 

But to me, if I can read someone's hand, it's fine. It doesn't have to be Palmer, Spencerian, or anything, just legible,

 

Thanks. It's just an example of how a print-based handwriting can be easily changed to look more "connected." A lot of people on FPN write beautiful cursive and a lot of people convert to cursive over time. I personally really like the "print" handwriting that is taught in US schools because it's perfectly legible and fairly easy for most people to improve in adulthood. The easiest thing to do, in my opinion, is to use oval-based letter forms, which is what both italic and American cursive have in common.

---

Please, visit my website at http://www.acousticpens.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...