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Copperplate Practice Workbook



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I have used "Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy - A Step-by-Step Manual" by Eleanor Winters and

"How to Write Copperplate" by Hamid Reza Ebrahimi. I still refer to them, from time to time.

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+ 1 on Eleanor Winters book. I also use and enjoy her book, Italic and Copperplate Calligraphy. That's an excellent two-for-one deal, gives you an idea of how similar and how different the two styles are.

 

Ken Frazer has a book on Copperplate styles and types, very good examples. He gives examples of the calligraphy and the handwriting of English Round-Hand as well, IIRC.

 

Copperplate has many names, Engraving Script, Engrossing Script, Round Hand (not all Round Hands are Copperplate, though). There are many good videos, texts, and tutorials on the subject at IAMPETH (www.iampeth.com). The site is sometimes troublesome to navigate but well worth looking at.

 

Best of luck,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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I have used "Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy - A Step-by-Step Manual" by Eleanor Winters and

"How to Write Copperplate" by Hamid Reza Ebrahimi. I still refer to them, from time to time.

+ 1 on Eleanor Winters book. I also use and enjoy her book, Italic and Copperplate Calligraphy. That's an excellent two-for-one deal, gives you an idea of how similar and how different the two styles are.

 

Ken Frazer has a book on Copperplate styles and types, very good examples. He gives examples of the calligraphy and the handwriting of English Round-Hand as well, IIRC.

 

Copperplate has many names, Engraving Script, Engrossing Script, Round Hand (not all Round Hands are Copperplate, though). There are many good videos, texts, and tutorials on the subject at IAMPETH (www.iampeth.com). The site is sometimes troublesome to navigate but well worth looking at.

 

Best of luck,

What's the best fountain pen with which to practice pressure strokes?

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If you can find/afford one, a Pelikan with a flex modification by Richard Binder, Mike Motisha, John Masuyama, et al. That will set you back north of $250.00 A Waterman with flex nib, maybe $200.00 or less. But, finding one for sale and making sure it has a flex nib? Not so easy.

 

In the less expensive line of pens, an Ahab with a flex nib runs a bit over $20, Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) carries a series of pens running from around $6 to over $40. FPR adds $3 to the cost of one of their pens to equip it with a flex nib (or broad-edge nib). The flex is variable, will be less than a Pelikan or Pilot Falcon with flex mod. But costwise, it doesn't break the bank.

 

The classic way to study Copperplate is to start with a dip pen, straight holder for lefties, oblique for right handers. It will teach you much more, IMHO, about that style of writing than a fountain pen. A good dip pen nib, such as the Leonardt Principal EF or a Gillot 303/404 or a Nikko/Zebra/Tachikawa G nib, and a good oblique holder plus a decent bottle of ink for same would set you back less than $100.00. Way less. This is the route I started on and the only way I do Copperplate now. Fountain pens just weren't as much fun.

 

Best of luck,

Edited by Randal6393

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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I have seen oblique holder, but I don't know how it's easier to learn with it. Shouldn't it be harder to learn since it's different than normal pens?

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The oblique holder is angled so that the flex line is much easier to write. Without contortions of the hand and wrist.

 

Pros: Easy to write with, easy to replace nibs, standard for flexed hands for around two hundred years. Not very expensive. Lots of tutorials on the web on how to use a dip pen.

 

Cons: It is a dip pen, requires learning how to load the ink and write with a pen that runs out of ink every so often. Not very portable.

 

Enjoy,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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Roughly, the shadow set is for pointed pen work, the round set is for broad-edged writing. In other words, Copperplate vs Italic. Either set is a fair starter set. However, Paper and Ink Arts or John Neal, Bookseller carries a much broader set of nibs and supplies. If you have a Michael's Hobbies handy, that would be the easiest way to get started.

 

A good start for Copperplate practice would be the Shadow set, a bottle of good ink, say Higgins Eternal, and a good pad of paper. From my experiences, would say you will soon realize what you do and don't like. And will amass a great deal of extra supplies, things that work well or not. Another good practice ink, available at Michael's, is the Speedball line.

 

Best of luck,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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Oh, yes, that is a good basic setup. By the way, I always order three of a nib that I want to try. You will wear nibs out, sometimes one may not be as sharp as you want, etc. It just makes sense to order a few.

 

My favorite oblique is the Blackwell adjustable and I often use Leonardt Principal EF's in mine.

 

Enjoy,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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The Blackwell Adjustable is available from John Neal, Bookseller. Either in plastic for ~$32 (H61) or in wood for ~$45 (H51). Have had mine for five years, tried everything from a Brause 66EF (very tiny) nib to a Leonardt Principal EF to a Brause Rose nib (very large). Works well with all, gave me a chance to try and see what I like for nibs.

 

My favorite nib is the Brause Rose nib. A real pain to get started and flowing but a gem to write with once it is broken in. Like the Nikko/Zebra/Tachikawa G nibs, always write a nice line and hold up well. The classic Gillott 303 and LP EF are fun, too. Problem with the Gillott nibs is that the steel rusts faster than many nibs. Have also used the infamous "Blue Pumpkin" nib to good effect.

 

All of these nibs easily fit into the Blackwell Adjustable holder. Mine is the wood model, the plastic should work just as well. I also have a Ziller Oblique and a Speedball Oblique that work well. Just require a bit more adjustment, so usually leave a Nikko G in each.

 

As for ink, I use Speedball Acrylic for practice, or Sumi inks from various manufacturers. Most final work is done with Old World or McCaffrey's iron gall inks. Find the Ziller inks to be good as well. And, JNB carries a great Walnut ink, in crystal form. Just add hot water to the crystals and stir, let settle.

 

Best of luck,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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    • A Smug Dill
      Even so, you'd end up with a fragmented list, and it becomes an O(N²) process for each prospective requestor to check what is available: effectively recreate the list of currently active servers (without any reliable up-to-date info upfront about the inks and number of samples on offer in the thread) from the sequential list of posts, which may be spread over two or even more pages, and then query each server independently to check what is currently on offer.   It comes down to not hav
    • LizEF
      If one wanted to do this, one could just use the "About Me" field which appears to be unlimited in size.  And if a bunch of people wanted to cooperate, the Member Title field (or signature) could be used to this end - "Ink Giver" (or some such) could be used by those with inks to give...  No software edits required.
    • Arkanabar
      I suppose the update issue could be mitigated.  One would post a link in signature, to the particular part of your profile where you list the inks that you're willing to post samples to others, gratis.  But looking at profiles, I suspect that would require an edit to the board's software, potentially a nontrivial task.
    • A Smug Dill
      I read your idea as getting willing givers to publicly register as members of a set of heterogenous servers, in a system in which a client would explicitly select an available server from a list, to which he/she will then send a request privately and asynchronously. Request handling in the system is unmanaged, and individual requests are handled by the targeted servers completely independently on each other. I think the model is fine, although there are some operational concerns you may want to
    • Daneaxe
      First thought on the method/system of ink sharing: Think the best way, to begin with, is to follow the way of the US thread: offer up a (small) list of inks you are willing to PIF, to whoever expresses interest. Write clearly in the "mission statement" how it works, with a tiny "quid pro quo" that even a struggling student can comply with, i.e. post your opinion and a writing sample, with option of a full review if desired.   So yours truly might say: "I'm offering up samples of D
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