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Modern Day Frankenpen


Meltemi
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Hello everyone! I was wondering if you have some suggestions for modern frankenpens (pens with parts from a different manufacturer). I currently have a Jinhao x450 with a Zebra G nib that has a huge amount of flex. However, I have terrible railroading problems. Any suggestions on other flexible frankenpens and ink "combos"?

I like flowers, mother of pearl, dip nibs, blue, green or red inks. I also like flowers, Frida Kahlo's paintings and Josephine Baker's songs. Did I mention flowers and mother of pearl?

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Cross Townsend with a Waterman semi flex 14K nib.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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The Ahab by Noodler is equipped with a larger-than-average feed. Should eliminate your railroading problem. Some of our members report success with using the Zebra G in Ahabs.

 

Best of luck,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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I have several Noodler Konrads fitted with the Zebra Comic G. I also have a lovely Laban Celebration with a Hero feed and a Comic G nib. the original Celebration feed is plastic, so I couldn't heat-set it.

 

I did fit the Comic G to an Ahab, but the pen is a bit too thick for my hands. I didn't have any railroading problems. The Comic G is sensitive to position. I have had the best success when the T-slit of the nib rests exactly on the last fin of the feed. That is, the feed closest to the point.

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A dip-pen flex nib in an Ahab or Konrad pen is worth a try. This is because the feeds are Ebonite and can be modified for more flow. Ebonite feeds flow better and may provide enough ink to keep up with a flexy nib if properly adjusted.

 

I would not attempt using a flexible nib of any type in a pen with a plastic feed.

 

Kevin at Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) sells Ebonite feeds and semi-flex steel nibs separately on his Web site. Provided you can get the FPR Ebonite feeds to fit your pen, that may be one solution.

 

http://fountainpenrevolution.com/

 

Good Luck, David

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EoC has used a flexible dip nib with a plastic feed. For the most part it works well. Maybe EoC was just lucky? Now considering the Noodler pens as surrogate bodies. Question: do both the Ahab and the Konrad support the frankenpen approach, and is one better than the other?

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EoC used a Jinhao X450 and Baoer. Both work tolerably well. When they're good, they're good, but when they are bad... :rolleyes:

 

Konrads are more expensive than Ahabs, no?

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EoC has used a flexible dip nib with a plastic feed. For the most part it works well. Maybe EoC was just lucky? Now considering the Noodler pens as surrogate bodies. Question: do both the Ahab and the Konrad support the frankenpen approach, and is one better than the other?

 

You can get "away" with a flex or semi-flex nib on a plastic feed if you are careful and 1) write slowly enough to let the feed keep up with the nib, and 2) use just the right combination of freely flowing ink and the right paper to support the flow. One good example of this in my pen herd is my Pilot 743 with an FA (Falcon) nib. It has a plastic feed on a gold semi-flex nib. It will write when flexed, but only if you are careful and the combination of ink and paper can support the flow.

 

But I still strongly recommend using an Ebonite feed with flex or semi-flex nibs, if you can.

 

As far as the Noodler's #6 nibs and feeds are concerned, the Ahab and Konrad pens are identical. On my Noodler's pens inserting the nib and feed in an Ahab means finding the small indent in the section where the nib slips in easily. On the Konrad however inserting the nib and feed can be done at any angle, there is no indent. That's the way it is on my Noodler's pens anyway, but I haven't bought one new for quite awhile. I don't know if the mechanical designs have changed over time.

 

While I'm at it I will mention that the #6 feed in the Ahab or Konrad will not fit in-place of a Jowo #6 feed. it is too big in diameter. I tried putting one in one of my Bexely pens that have a Jowo #6 nib (an Intrepid). It didn't work. I suspect the situation is the same with the Bock #6 System nibs and feeds.

Edited by Drone
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EoC used a Jinhao X450 and Baoer. Both work tolerably well. When they're good, they're good, but when they are bad... :rolleyes:

 

Konrads are more expensive than Ahabs, no?

 

I found Konrads for $20. Some colors are more expensive.

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in order to produce "flexed" lines I twist the converter to the point of seeing the first lines of the feed filled with ink. As for the nibs; yes, after some weeks they will turn scratchy. I however smooth them out, sacrificing finer lines for smoothness. (For those who want to try it)

I like flowers, mother of pearl, dip nibs, blue, green or red inks. I also like flowers, Frida Kahlo's paintings and Josephine Baker's songs. Did I mention flowers and mother of pearl?

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in order to produce "flexed" lines I twist the converter to the point of seeing the first lines of the feed filled with ink. As for the nibs; yes, after some weeks they will turn scratchy. I however smooth them out, sacrificing finer lines for smoothness. (For those who want to try it)

 

 

That's odd. My nibs get smoother with time. I have had one nib in daily use for almost a year now. It's not quite as fine as it was to begin with, but it's such a pleasure to use I haven't swapped it out yet. No corrosion, either (chrome nib).

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Eureka! I found the fix for such issues! I took apart the nib and the feed and deepened the channel with a knife. It is dramatically more stable. Yes, it is very very dangerous proccess not only to the pen but also your hands but it was worth it. It is much more wetter and has a great flow. I followed this video:

 

For those who have similar problems and want to do it: It is very dangerous as if you deepen the channel too much ink you will have "baby's bottom" issues. Modify nothing you are willing to sacrifise. Take your time, try hacking the channel once and test it then twice and test it again. When you can write a sentence without railroading, you should not go any further than that.

 

In response to Vorbal: Thank you very much for your comments on this thread :D. I have been using the nib that I am currently writting with for two weeks and noticed very slight corrosion. For a chrome nib and a cheap jinhao I have to say the results are pleasing.

I like flowers, mother of pearl, dip nibs, blue, green or red inks. I also like flowers, Frida Kahlo's paintings and Josephine Baker's songs. Did I mention flowers and mother of pearl?

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I suspect corrosion is an ink-related problem. I have only used de Atramentis Document Archive Black, because it flows especially well in these nibs, doesn't clog or blot, and is waterproof. I use the pens for sketching as well as writing. I tried other inks--Noodler's X-Feather, Noodler's Black Eel, de Atramentis Frankincense, and Namiki Black--and had one problem or another. The Namiki black, for example, just flowed out of the pen. The Noodler's ink produced blobs now and then. Frankincense just didn't flow well.

 

You can switch over to the Comic G Titanium, but I find these produce a slightly thicker line...they seem to be a bit softer than the Chromes. Theoretically, the Titanium nibs shouldn't corrode.

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I use Parker Quink in red which is a dry ink ( The only one I can buy from the store and not order). The Titanium Zebra G idea intrigues me very much however. For its price, the Chrome Zebra G is great, but I would love to try the Titanium version once I run out of the Chrome one.

I like flowers, mother of pearl, dip nibs, blue, green or red inks. I also like flowers, Frida Kahlo's paintings and Josephine Baker's songs. Did I mention flowers and mother of pearl?

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