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Sheaffer: Skrip Turquoise



akszugor

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http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-kleks.png



I present test ink Sheaffer Skrip Turquoise a very nice shade of turquoise, resembling a clean lagoon. Ink writes very well, the parameters is also very good. Drying also very good. Traditional, popular, available at an affordable price. What more could you want? Highly recommended.




Manufacturer: Sheaffer


Series, colour: Skrip Turquoise


Pen: Waterman Hemisphere, nib "F"


Paper: Image Volume (80 g / m2)



Specifications:


Flow rate: good


Lubrication: good


Bleed through: possible point


Shading: noticeable


Feathering: unnoticeable


Saturation: very good




A drop of ink smeared with a nib



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-kleks.jpg



The ink smudged with a cotton pad



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-wacik.jpg



Lines



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-kreski.jpg



Water Resistance



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-woda.jpg



Ink drying time



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-wysychanie.jpg



Ink drops on a handkerchief



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-chromatografia1.jpg



Chromatography



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-chromatografia2.jpg



Sample text



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-txt.jpg



Sample text in an Oxford notebook A5 (90 g / m2)



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-Oxford.jpg



Sample letters in a Rhodia notebook No 16 (90 g / m2)



http://inks.pencyklopedia.pl/wp-content/uploads/Sheaffer-Skrip-Turquoise-Rhodia.jpg


https://atramentopedia.wordpress.com/

https://powiekibodhidharmy.wordpress.com/

 

If you have interesting inks and you want to give a sample for testing - welcome.
We can exchange a color sample.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
notimetoulouse

Thanks for taking the time to put this together for us, I have four other Slovenian Skrip inks (really like the blue black)... but, as I'm newish to turquoise inks, would Skrip be classed as a benchmark colour, or is there another turquoise out there that is more effective?

I might be old, but at least I got to see all the best Bands.

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This is an interesting ink, it WILL SHADE, in the right pen.

I put it into an old Esterbrook, and the ink wrote a darker teal color, and it shaded. But the Esterbrook is a bit wet, so I presume the shading is as a result of the increased ink flow.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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People don't talk much about Sheaffer Turquoise because they miss Peacock Blue. There are a lot of good shading turquoises out there, specially from the pen companies like Lamy, Waterman and Pelikan. I guess any of these will make a turquoise fan happy.

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inkstainedruth

People don't talk much about Sheaffer Turquoise because they miss Peacock Blue. There are a lot of good shading turquoises out there, specially from the pen companies like Lamy, Waterman and Pelikan. I guess any of these will make a turquoise fan happy.

The problem is that it just isn't the same as Peacock Blue. That ink has this amazing quality to it that I've only seen in a few other inks -- but not in any of the turquoise inks I've tried.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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The problem is that it just isn't the same as Peacock Blue. That ink has this amazing quality to it that I've only seen in a few other inks -- but not in any of the turquoise inks I've tried.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

That is what I was talking about :)

 

I have never used Peacock Blue, but that was such a nice name, it is hard to understand why they have this urge to abolish classic names and use uninspired ones. It is almost like they are not listening to the market. People buy inks sometimes because they have a fancy name! What Waterman did to their ink names was also very sad to see. No wonder people are going after "boutique" inks nowadays. There is nothing personal and unique in buying something that companies try to standardize in the most generic way.

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My friend gave me a metropolitan and a sample vial of this ink for my birthday. It has been one of my favorite ever since.

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inkstainedruth

 

That is what I was talking about :)

 

I have never used Peacock Blue, but that was such a nice name, it is hard to understand why they have this urge to abolish classic names and use uninspired ones. It is almost like they are not listening to the market. People buy inks sometimes because they have a fancy name! What Waterman did to their ink names was also very sad to see. No wonder people are going after "boutique" inks nowadays. There is nothing personal and unique in buying something that companies try to standardize in the most generic way.

It's worse than that. Skrip Turquoise isn't the same ink as Peacock Blue. So I can understand why the name changed. What I don't understand is why the formulation apparently changed. What was it about Peacock Blue that Sheaffer changed it -- unless it was *either* the case where some of the component chemicals became unavailable; *or* that they were responding to market forces where people were switching over to ballpoints more and more. Or that some chemical was deemed *unsafe* (the same way that you can't get the old version of Pelikan 4001 Blue Black in the US any more).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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It's worse than that. Skrip Turquoise isn't the same ink as Peacock Blue. So I can understand why the name changed. What I don't understand is why the formulation apparently changed. What was it about Peacock Blue that Sheaffer changed it -- unless it was *either* the case where some of the component chemicals became unavailable; *or* that they were responding to market forces where people were switching over to ballpoints more and more. Or that some chemical was deemed *unsafe* (the same way that you can't get the old version of Pelikan 4001 Blue Black in the US any more).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

And this ink doesn't even have good shading... But color is okay

vaibhav mehandiratta

architect & fountain pen connoisseur

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ruth

Sheaffer changed the ink formulation when they moved from the US to Slovenia, to adjust for the availability of the ingredients in Europe. Then they changed it again, apparently because that first version was too light in color.

 

@mehandiratta

Skrip turquoise does have good shading, but it has to be in a pen that will do it. My Esterbrook shaded quite well, my Parker 45 not at all.

Edited by ac12

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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