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Resin V. Solitaire



Drcollector

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I currently have a resin-exclusive collection, but I find myself increasingly drawn to the lustrous solitaire models - namely the stainless steel and platinum versions. Montblanc resin, while not exactly fragile, is of course more prone to scratches than steel. However, I consider the resin models more classy and symbolic of Montblanc heritage. For owners of both, which do you prefer and why?

Urushiphile

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The Solitaire range simply offers more variations in terms of material, looks and design.

 

But be careful; once you get one you want them all :-)

 

My favorites are the old style Sterling Silver (barleycorn finish), the Geometric Dimensions and the Tribute to Montblanc at the moment.

 

If you like the steel models I'd recommend the minimalistic, clean look of the first series Stainless Steel, the Carbon Steel or even Black Ceramic pens.

 

Cheers

 

Michael

 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hofptWATsK8/VJ6QSniPg_I/AAAAAAAAAWs/GKz_Vuh22fQ/s1600/sterlinhsilveropen.JPG

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I love the Stainless steel pens ... and have several of them.

 

Montblanc resin, while not exactly fragile, is of course more prone to scratches than steel.

 

 

No. These polished steel pens scratch very, very easily. That's the reason why I havn't used my Stainless Steel collection yet :blush:

__________________________________

 

www.fountainpen.de - the website for Montblanc and Astoria collectors

 

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I agree the solitaires that have a smooth surface pick up scratches as easily or more so than the resin. The textured patters tend to hold up better. But, you also have to worry about dents, something that is not a worry with resin.

 

I say it is great to have some of each. The silver on my pen is just a skin so it is not super heavy, but it has a little more substantial feel than a pure resin pen.

 

My current favorite was the solitaire silver pen with the MOP star. I ended up trading it, but I still miss that pen and that lovely top.

 

Here is a photo:

fpn_1443554275__solitaire_example.jpg

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I think the black resin is very classy and subtle.

Personally I find the metal versions a bit too much "gold rolex" and bling.

They attract much more attention then the black ones.

But that is what puts me off on

metal/shiny pens in general, not just MB.

I do agree that there is more variety on the pens which is more interesting.

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Thanks for the replies and beautiful photos. The solitaire models are indeed a stark contrast to the black and gold standard. The Tribute to Mont Blanc is easily my favorite, followed closely by stainless steel - and perhaps something fun - like carbon fiber/steel!

Urushiphile

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But, you also have to worry about dents, something that is not a worry with resin.

 

A hit that's hard enough to cause a dent to a metal pen will probably cause a nasty crack to a plastic one. :D

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A hit that's hard enough to cause a dent to a metal pen will probably cause a nasty crack to a plastic one. :D

You'd be surprised. Since the metal is really a thin layer over the a resin pen, the thickness of the resin can take a little ping more than the thin metal sheeting. I'm not talking about the solid gold pens. those tend to be more robust (from observation, not personal use) but that could be a function of the cost leading to a more sheltered life.

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!

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I have both the resin (149) and the carbon steel 146.

I use to prefer metal over resin before, but now I find myself using the resin more often.

 

In theory, metals are stronger than resin and I wanted the stronger material for my thousand dollar pen.

however in practice, I never drop or rough handle the thousand dollar pen because, well, they are thousand dollar pens...

 

So the lighter material edge out a bit in the end due to writing comfort.

Edited by desertdingo
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Solitaires and bling !!!! Yeah baby :D

 

fpn_1406195353__gold_rolex_2.jpg

Money may not make you happy but I would rather cry in a Rolls-Royce

 

The true definition of madness - Doing the same thing everyday and expecting different results......

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King 'Soli' at rest ( in a Duofold box ! )

 

fpn_1351866926__18ct1.jpg

Money may not make you happy but I would rather cry in a Rolls-Royce

 

The true definition of madness - Doing the same thing everyday and expecting different results......

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Why not do a little of both, with a doué? I just picked this up yesterday:

 

http://www.arcmailbox.com/img/pens/geometric.jpg

 

Besides this new one, I seem to be shying away from the resins for the most part. I guess I like the weight of the metal or lacquer pens better.

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Ah Doue's.....another lovely range that MB tempt me with !

Money may not make you happy but I would rather cry in a Rolls-Royce

 

The true definition of madness - Doing the same thing everyday and expecting different results......

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Mister Mont Blanc

I had the same dilemma as you. I went on a Montblanc buying spree shortly after acquiring my first few Montblancs. It was really a sort of binge that was short lived and soon regretted. I remember looking into my pen case and starting from the left to the right, I saw one black Montblanc, then a second black Montblanc, then a third black Montblanc, and so on. I decided I wasn't going to keep buying multiples of the same thing that just wrote a different way. I wanted variety; especially in my pens for work. Now when it comes to writing at home, I solely use a 149, and with those, you can't really get much variety. Although, the new Platinum trim version and an occasional 90th anniversary nib are sufficient variety for me in a 149 as the nib is what I care about and see when actually writing. But for my ballpoints and roller balls that I take out and use at work and school, I love having pens that stand out and really catch my eye even when just resting in front of me. I quickly came to love the Solitaire lines and will probably never run out of pens that I want from there. I usually opt for the doué versions because I like the contrast, the compromise in weight, and the compromise in price. I love the 90th Anniversary Solitaire, Geometric Dimension pens (now available in Platinum too) and the recent Blue Hour pens. I regret getting the Blue Hour doué in a Classique though because the design is so small and intricate that I really don't get enough of it just in the barrel. I think the midsize ballpoint or the Legrand sizes are much more beautiful with so much more Blue Hour balance. :wub:

I also agree with you on the resin, which is another reason I like the Solitaire lines. At least the ones I have had held up their new look more than the resin does. I am not a fan of the weight of most Solitaire pens, especially the full metal ones, but that is why I do not buy them as fountain pens for lengthy writing. Interestingly, the Blue Hour series uses a resin base under the lacquer instead of a metal base, at least for my Classique Doué ballpoint. That certainly helps with the weight balance and I'm sure it was a way to cut costs. The lacquered pens also hold up more than the resin in my opinion and still glisten through all of the finger prints or marks that quickly dull a resin's shine. Those lacquer designs can just be memorizing sometimes and how about those mother of pearl stars, ey?! :D

I keep thinking about selling some of my pens but all that happens is I keep acquiring more!

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Was cleaning mine last week and found this out - is this standard for all 146's?

 

The nib unit does screw out on all of them, newer ones have a seal in the nib unit not requiring sealant like the pink goo of older ones.

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So adorable! Thanks for the responses. I am not too fond of the doue pens, but the geometric dimensions stands out above the rest. Perhaps it is the texture. In the end, I settled with a 149 in black and gold and sold most of my platinum-plated pens. I feel that there is a charm in the gold furniture that platinum lacks. But there comes the point where one must explore; perhaps a 146 bordeaux will do. :)

 

On another note, I've taken an interest in the Boheme because of the retractable nib, but in person they are tiny! I also hear that they can clog up pretty easily.

Urushiphile

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