Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Please Recommend Me A Fine And Lightweight Fountain Pen.



Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I am looking to get a daily use pen. I want a pen which is lightweight and writes fine and smooth (preferably high ink capacity and nib dries slowly). I am a graduate student and will use the pen to write a lot of math symbols/proofs mostly on HP laserjet 24lb papers for long time.

 

I have Pilot Decimo F, Lamy 2000 EF and Metropolitan F. I use VP when I take notes in class since it is retractable, but when I need to write for long time, I cannot use it since it is kind of heavy for me.

 

Thus, I have recently bought Lamy 2000 EF for long time writing. I like the weight and the size of Lamy 2000, but it writes too thick for me even though it has extra fine nib. This one writes thicker than Decimo Fine.

 

I really like the smoothness of Decimo. I think it is smoother than Lamy 2000 EF and Metropolitan F. The only problem I have with it is the weight. I think I like Japanese fine size nib (not sure about other brands since I only have two Pilot pens). Can anyone recommend me some good pen for me under $150? (I prefer no vintage pen)

 

Thanks,

Edited by JoeB
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 50
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • JoeB

    13

  • Algester

    3

  • Erik Dalton

    3

  • subbu68

    3

If you like Pilot pens, have you considered the Custom Heritage 92? Piston-filler demonstrator. Holds about 1.5ml. Weighs 25grams. Has a Pilot #5 14k nib and obviously you know you like the Fine nibs from this maker. The nib is slightly springy. Can be bought for around $100, or less.

 

At the 'value' end of the range, I love my Platinum Cool. It's a demonstrator C/C pen. I sometimes use an adapter (costs about $2) so it can take international cartridges, but it obviously also takes a Platinum convertor, which is a good size, or proprietary Platinum cartridges. The Platinum Fine is very slightly finer than the Pilot in my opinion. The nib is steel, but has a nice springy feel to it, unusual for this maker. May need a little bit of smoothing to tweak to your taste. Really light, comfortable pen. Costs less than $50.

 

Of course, there are many other options. Sailor nibs are excellent, so you maybe want to try a Sapporo. I have one with an EF 14k nib. Nice writer, and lightweight, but quite short in length. The nibs are fairly firm. Not sure about the ink capacity.

 

I'm sure others will add their suggestions...... :-)

Verba volant, scripta manent

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you like Pilot pens, have you considered the Custom Heritage 92? Piston-filler demonstrator. Holds about 1.5ml. Weighs 25grams. Has a Pilot #5 14k nib and obviously you know you like the Fine nibs from this maker. The nib is slightly springy. Can be bought for around $100, or less.

 

At the 'value' end of the range, I love my Platinum Cool. It's a demonstrator C/C pen. I sometimes use an adapter (costs about $2) so it can take international cartridges, but it obviously also takes a Platinum convertor, which is a good size, or proprietary Platinum cartridges. The Platinum Fine is very slightly finer than the Pilot in my opinion. The nib is steel, but has a nice springy feel to it, unusual for this maker. May need a little bit of smoothing to tweak to your taste. Really light, comfortable pen. Costs less than $50.

 

Of course, there are many other options. Sailor nibs are excellent, so you maybe want to try a Sapporo. I have one with an EF 14k nib. Nice writer, and lightweight, but quite short in length. The nibs are fairly firm. Not sure about the ink capacity.

 

I'm sure others will add their suggestions...... :-)

Thank you for the help!

I am checking out Custom Heritage 92 now. Do you own one by any chance? If you do, would it be possible to tell me how it feels different from Lamy2000?

 

 

 

Since you like the Vanishing Point, you might want to consider the Decimo. It's smaller and lighter (I think)

 

Francis

Thanks!

Actually, the one I have is Decimo.. Maybe I should edit it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the help!

I am checking out Custom Heritage 92 now. Do you own one by any chance? If you do, would it be possible to tell me how it feels different from Lamy2000?

 

 

I do own a 92 but can't compare it as I don't currently have a Lamy 2K. I'm not a fan - wrong shape for me and I don't like their nibs. Had one and moved it on.

Verba volant, scripta manent

Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm light weight... Pilot... Prera?

I like me CH91 though... but it broke when I dropped it so sent to Pilot after a failure of an emergency repair... I have no news until next year at the very least cause... we dont have Pilot's support...

Edited by Algester
Link to post
Share on other sites

I do own a 92 but can't compare it as I don't currently have a Lamy 2K. I'm not a fan - wrong shape for me and I don't like their nibs. Had one and moved it on.

It seems like I don't like their nibs either.

Thank you for the recommandation!

Link to post
Share on other sites

First, Since you are partial to Japanese fine nibs I would strongly recommend a sailor 1911. These are the prize of my collection. They are light weight and have the smoothest extra fine nibs on the planet IMHO. The down side is ink capacity they are cartridge / converter fill, but you could carry spare cartridges. There are some good prices out there on the bay and Amazon right now. You just may be able to meet your price range.

Second, If you want to focus on ink capacity and weight, the pelikan m-200 is something you could write all day with and never tire. The gold plated steel nib would prolly be your best bet for extra fine as the gold nibs tend not to write as fine.

Third, and almost double of your price range. Just in case you find a rich uncle, check out a Gateway Belmont. Very light, large capacity piston fill, American made. Really nice writing nibs.

Hope this helps. Good luck on your search.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe a TWSBI Mini or TWSBI Classic with an ef nib.

Lot of ink, fine nib, but I am not sure about the weight. The TWSBI Classic works for me pretty well and I take a lot of notes. Almost as practical as my Lamy Safari.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was in grad school, I used a Lamy Safari and cartridges. I didn't want to fiddle with ink bottles back then. I also had a Rotring Core, which I loved. Both were inexpensive and reliable.

"Today will be gone in less than 24 hours. When it is gone, it is gone. Be wise, but enjoy! - anonymous today

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

TWSBI Vac 700 EF

 

Easily one of my favourite pens. Massive ink capacity. Nib is a nail but fine and very smooth. Great balance and a joy to use.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aloha JoeB,

 

Since you like the VP, look for the older model that was made of faceted plastic. I have both the newer brass barrel with lacquer finish, and the older model. To be quite honest, I actually prefer the older model as it is way lighter and I like the way the clip is integrated with the barrel front. Besides, you can swap out the nib unit between newer and older models, (need to use the aerometric convertor with the older model though as the CON50 convertor does not fit the older model).

 

Good luck; the VP is one of my favorite pens.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You will go nuts trying to find the perfect pen/nib combination. You will squander a fortune in search of the perfect line. So do yourself a favor and send your Lamy 2000 to a nibmeister such as Michael Masuyama at Mike-it-Work to regrind and tune your nib. Include some writing samples of the line width you want the pen to write like on the paper you write on the most and include a couple of extra pieces of this paper for him to draw test lines on.

 

I have sent Mike over 10 pens for him to regrind for me, including Cross', Sheaffers', Watermans', and Pelikans, since I like my line widths 0.4mm wide or less. All ten pens now write with identical line widths. He did a great job. I am sure one of the other reputable nibmeisters can do the same alteration for you. I have found this is the only way to get the desired nib performance when it did not write the way I had hoped for after buying it.

Avatar painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 - 1905) titled La leçon difficile (The difficult lesson)

Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm light weight... Pilot... Prera?

I like me CH91 though... but it broke when I dropped it so sent to Pilot after a failure of an emergency repair... I have no news until next year at the very least cause... we dont have Pilot's support...

Thanks,

I think I want a nib that's little soft like VP nib. too bad that happened... hope you can get it back soon!

Link to post
Share on other sites

First, Since you are partial to Japanese fine nibs I would strongly recommend a sailor 1911. These are the prize of my collection. They are light weight and have the smoothest extra fine nibs on the planet IMHO. The down side is ink capacity they are cartridge / converter fill, but you could carry spare cartridges. There are some good prices out there on the bay and Amazon right now. You just may be able to meet your price range.

Second, If you want to focus on ink capacity and weight, the pelikan m-200 is something you could write all day with and never tire. The gold plated steel nib would prolly be your best bet for extra fine as the gold nibs tend not to write as fine.

Third, and almost double of your price range. Just in case you find a rich uncle, check out a Gateway Belmont. Very light, large capacity piston fill, American made. Really nice writing nibs.

Hope this helps. Good luck on your search.

Thanks for the recommandations,

I will check them out! I seem not to be able to find Gateway Belmont tho..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe a TWSBI Mini or TWSBI Classic with an ef nib.

Lot of ink, fine nib, but I am not sure about the weight. The TWSBI Classic works for me pretty well and I take a lot of notes. Almost as practical as my Lamy Safari.

TWSBI Vac 700 EF

 

Easily one of my favourite pens. Massive ink capacity. Nib is a nail but fine and very smooth. Great balance and a joy to use.

Thanks!

I used to have TWSBI with EF nib but it just wrote too thick for my taste..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aloha JoeB,

 

Since you like the VP, look for the older model that was made of faceted plastic. I have both the newer brass barrel with lacquer finish, and the older model. To be quite honest, I actually prefer the older model as it is way lighter and I like the way the clip is integrated with the barrel front. Besides, you can swap out the nib unit between newer and older models, (need to use the aerometric convertor with the older model though as the CON50 convertor does not fit the older model).

 

Good luck; the VP is one of my favorite pens.

Thanks,

Yes, it is one of my favorite pens too.

Do you know where I can search for the older model by any chance? I have never seen them even in pics.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You will go nuts trying to find the perfect pen/nib combination. You will squander a fortune in search of the perfect line. So do yourself a favor and send your Lamy 2000 to a nibmeister such as Michael Masuyama at Mike-it-Work to regrind and tune your nib. Include some writing samples of the line width you want the pen to write like on the paper you write on the most and include a couple of extra pieces of this paper for him to draw test lines on.

 

I have sent Mike over 10 pens for him to regrind for me, including Cross', Sheaffers', Watermans', and Pelikans, since I like my line widths 0.4mm wide or less. All ten pens now write with identical line widths. He did a great job. I am sure one of the other reputable nibmeisters can do the same alteration for you. I have found this is the only way to get the desired nib performance when it did not write the way I had hoped for after buying it.

Thanks Steven,

You're very right..It kinda drives me crazy... I was thinking that too, but it seems like it will take very long time to send the pen, adjust it, and get it back again.. How long does it usually take for you when Michael regrinds your nibs?

Link to post
Share on other sites

To me, the best suggestion is a Pilot Custom 823. Huge ink capacity, find nib, light weight and perfect balance. But expensive. A good alternate would be the Platinum Century 3776. Light weight good balance and a wonderfully smooth nib. Potential drawback are the proprietary cartridges, but the cartridges hold a good bit of ink and the cap prevents dry-out. I purchased mine for less than $100 on Amazon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try a Platinum Century 3776. They are about the same size as the Lamy 2000 and weight about 14g uncapped (about 3g less than the Lamy 2K, also uncapped). Their nibs are amazingly good (basically the same nibs used in the much more expensive Nakayas) and they are readily available for about $80 at Amazon and many other sellers, making them the best value out there. If you like fine nibs, they do it: the reported width of their fine nibs is 0.28mm (vs. 0.35 mm for Pilot) - and you can have either the regular fine or the soft fine. They also have the slip and seal mechanism that prevents them from drying out and the Chartres Blue or Bourgogne red are very beautiful pens (but if you like black, they also have it).

 

With the money left from your budget you can send that Lamy to a nibmeister ;).

 

Edited to add: I only saw Jameswatts post after I posted this, and I agree about the balance of the 3776 too.

Edited by Lam1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...