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Sailor Koshu Inden - How Do They Stand Against Wear And Tear?


fly_us
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Hi all,

 

I'm thinking to get a Koshu Inden as my next pen. Both colors are fantastic but my concern is how well they are over the time with normal usage? Is the dear skin easier wear and tear than other materials like plastic or wood?

 

I tried to search but there is almost no review on this pen. It is not cheap and i want to use the pen as a daily driver, not a display piece.

 

Thank you.

Edited by fly_us
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Read a lot about Koshu Inden technique today. Treated dear skin is supposed to be durable material therefore it is used for warrior class in old days.

 

But no information about how the pen is after a long time. The reason might be because of the product line is quite new.

 

Still looking for your opinions.

 

Thank you.

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either do I there's barely any document on the Japanese side aswell

Yes, it is strange. The pens are beautiful but they are almost invisible on the Internet, except the merchants' pages with almost identical descriptions.

 

Tried to look on Japanese websites using Google Translate but it is the same.

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I'm afraid I can't help directly as I don't own the pen.

 

They are very beautiful up close. I really liked the sheath pattern; the dots do look somewhat delicate. My guess would be that leather showing a little wear is part of the aesthetic of the pen.

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I'm afraid I can't help directly as I don't own the pen.

 

They are very beautiful up close. I really liked the sheath pattern; the dots do look somewhat delicate. My guess would be that leather showing a little wear is part of the aesthetic of the pen.

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I'm afraid I can't help directly as I don't own the pen.

 

They are very beautiful up close. I really liked the sheath pattern; the dots do look somewhat delicate. My guess would be that leather showing a little wear is part of the aesthetic of the pen.

 

That's what i thought. I don't mind a little wear here and there, in fact, i prefer my leather stuffs are a bit worn out to give the roughness feeling. What i concern is the urushi painting, i really worry that it might chip out.

 

Maybe i just go and get one, then report back :)

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I agree that's the only reasonable thing to do.

 

I think as long as you handle your pen with a little care, the urushi should hold up nicely.

Edited by hooper
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I don't have the pen, but I do have a small collection of Inden wallets, change purses, straps, and cases. I have been using them daily for years and years and they still look almost new. They feel indescribable. I especially adore my black-on-black wallet that has little embossed dragonflies. It's quite old now, but still in beautiful shape.

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I actually bought the Sakura version but returned it before even inking it. I could just see myself rubbing all the urushi petals off (to its credit, it really did have a nice "tactile element"). The nibs.com rep I e-mailed did say that the pens were made for usage, but I couldn't get over that mental image--it would have remained a display piece for me.

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Thank you for your inputs. I couldn't stop myself and just ordered one, received today but didn't have chance to ink it yet. I purchased the black one with sheath pattern because i scare that the red one might get dirty easily.

 

The pen doesn't come with converter but 2 black cartridges only. The only feasible reason for this is Sailor don't want people to mess with the ink on the inden. But who care about black cartridges, i'm gonna get a converter on the way home today and ink it with Bungbox L'amant when i reach home.

 

First impression is the inden is soft on hand but seem very durable. The lacquer painting from the look is not going to chip off easily, but the real problem is the inky fingers. It is leather, so if i stain it, well, nothing much i can do if i don't want to touch the painting.

 

And now i need another pen kimono because the pen doesn't come with one like my Nakaya. Maybe it is the time to pull the trigger for a Chan's handmade pen wrap.

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After few days try to get use to it, i must say that the Koshu Inden technique is standing up to its name. The material is tough, and could be use as a daily driver without worry much. Of course you should always look for your inky fingers to stain it.

 

The pen is great, except that the cap is too heavy to post. The barrel's end does have the small "ears" to snap the cap when post, but the balance will be off. Luckily, i almost never post when writing but someone who like it might reconsider this factor. Without the cap, the pen is quite heavy but comfort to use, and the lacquar dots does not get in with the grip.

 

To my surprise, the nib is misaligned out of the box, which is rare for Sailor nibs. After some adjustments, the nib finally shows its true potential, glides on the paper with a hint of feedback as a MF nib should be.

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  • 1 month later...

After few days try to get use to it, i must say that the Koshu Inden technique is standing up to its name. The material is tough, and could be use as a daily driver without worry much. Of course you should always look for your inky fingers to stain it.

 

The pen is great, except that the cap is too heavy to post. The barrel's end does have the small "ears" to snap the cap when post, but the balance will be off. Luckily, i almost never post when writing but someone who like it might reconsider this factor. Without the cap, the pen is quite heavy but comfort to use, and the lacquar dots does not get in with the grip.

 

To my surprise, the nib is misaligned out of the box, which is rare for Sailor nibs. After some adjustments, the nib finally shows its true potential, glides on the paper with a hint of feedback as a MF nib should be.

I'm considering this as my first sailor, too. Can't decide between this and 1911L w/ emperor nib. On one hand, the emperor nib is 21k and FREAKING AMAZINGLY BEAUTIFUL, but can't beat the Koshu Inden's looks!

Edited by KostyaKev

Current Task Force:

Sailor Koshu-Inden Petite Blossoms, Sailor 1911L, Sailor Realo, Cross Classic Century, Faber-Castell Ambition, Pilot Cavalier, Lamy Al-star, and an entire insane asylum full of Kawecos I regret buying.

 

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  • 5 years later...

Bumping this old thread, as I've been very curious about this very topic for a while now.  Has anyone been using one of these pens for a few years and could comment on the wear and tear?  For example I wonder how water and hand oils affect the finish, whether the urushi is dulling or chipping off, etc.  Also whether the leather begins to unwrap at the seam.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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Mine is a few years old and it is holding up well but admittedly it one of a few hundred pens I rotate in and out.

I'm not sure that help..

the Danitrio Fellowship

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1 hour ago, Doug C said:

Mine is a few years old and it is holding up well but admittedly it one of a few hundred pens I rotate in and out.

 

Same here.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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I suppose it's somewhat helpful, but you both haven't really been using your pens much, then it's not a good indicator of how the pen holds up with use over time :(  Mostly how it holds up in storage.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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Have both red and black models. Holds up well over time. Urushi does not wear or delaminate. Leather acquires a slight patina from the oils in hands. Seam does not come loose. The black was used extensively for over one year. Wife uses red almost daily.

stan

Formerly Ryojusen Pens
The oldest and largest buyer and seller of vintage Japanese pens in America.


Member: Pen Collectors of America & Fuente, THE Japanese Pen Collectors Club

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1 hour ago, stan said:

Have both red and black models. Holds up well over time. Urushi does not wear or delaminate. Leather acquires a slight patina from the oils in hands. Seam does not come loose. The black was used extensively for over one year. Wife uses red almost daily.

 

Excellent information, thank you!  Did the red one darken slightly toward maroon?  That's the one I'm leaning toward.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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