Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Looking To Get Into Dip Nib Pens, Any Recommendations?


Arctic_Wolf
 Share

Recommended Posts

Looking for recommendations of super flexible and/or italic-ish nibs to try for a dip pen. I figure this'll be a lot less expensive than going after a full-flex fountain pen and not even knowing how to make use of it, and it'll be easier to clean too. Ink recommendations also welcome, I know they're generally different from regular FP inks.

Edited by Arctic_Wolf
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Randal6393

    1

  • AAAndrew

    2

  • Cryptos

    1

  • Arctic_Wolf

    2

Hi, Welcome to FPN. Glad to see you here.

 

For flex work, recommend a good elbow oblique holder. This assumes you are right-handed. Lefties generally use straight holders. My favorite is the Blackwell from John Neal, Books. But there are many other great holders that will work well. I favor the Blackwell since it will take dip nibs from very small to very large. The best way to check out nibs is to get three or four each of what looks interesting. I prefer Brause Rose nibs, Brause 66EF's, Leonardt Principals, and Gillot 303's. One of the best newer nibs are the G-nibs, made by Zebra, Nikko, or Tachikawa. My favored ink for pointed work is a good iron-gall, sumi inks for practice. There are many listed at online supply stores, everyone has their favorites. Papers, practice is good on copy papers, final work is usually on something like HP 32-lb laserjet bond. Again, everyone has their favorites.

 

For Broad-edged work, my preference is for Wm. Mitchell pens in a straight holder. Be sure to get ink wells to put on the pen. I recently tried Tachikawa nibs and they work great, have a double ink well. Really neat work. Be prepared to sharpen your nibs, may be needed to get good thicks and thins. Inks, again, sumi works well. Higgins Eternal is one of the best practice inks. I find Calli inks to be fun and easy to use. Paper, much the same as for flex pens.

 

Best of luck to you, take the time to enjoy your writing,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, Welcome to FPN. Glad to see you here.

 

For flex work, recommend a good elbow oblique holder. This assumes you are right-handed. Lefties generally use straight holders. My favorite is the Blackwell from John Neal, Books. But there are many other great holders that will work well. I favor the Blackwell since it will take dip nibs from very small to very large. The best way to check out nibs is to get three or four each of what looks interesting. I prefer Brause Rose nibs, Brause 66EF's, Leonardt Principals, and Gillot 303's. One of the best newer nibs are the G-nibs, made by Zebra, Nikko, or Tachikawa. My favored ink for pointed work is a good iron-gall, sumi inks for practice. There are many listed at online supply stores, everyone has their favorites. Papers, practice is good on copy papers, final work is usually on something like HP 32-lb laserjet bond. Again, everyone has their favorites.

 

For Broad-edged work, my preference is for Wm. Mitchell pens in a straight holder. Be sure to get ink wells to put on the pen. I recently tried Tachikawa nibs and they work great, have a double ink well. Really neat work. Be prepared to sharpen your nibs, may be needed to get good thicks and thins. Inks, again, sumi works well. Higgins Eternal is one of the best practice inks. I find Calli inks to be fun and easy to use. Paper, much the same as for flex pens.

 

Best of luck to you, take the time to enjoy your writing,

 

 

Thanks for the advice Mr. Randal, I'll definitely look into these :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Somethings take some getting used to. I actually find using a straight holder with a flexible nib more comfortable than with an oblique, although that is slowly changing. Obliques are a bit weird at first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason for using an oblique holder for a right handed person is that it lines up the nib with the down stroke. So that you are pulling straight down with the nib. In a straight holder, for me at least, the down stroke would be a diagonal stroke of the nib, and that sometime spits and spatters because I am pulling diagonally on the nib rather that downward. I started with straight holders, then I switched to obliques and only use my straight for nibs that will not fit in the oblique holder.

 

Another good flex nib is the Leonardt Hiro 41. I have one, and it is a nice soft flexible nib. They have been having QC problems with "something" (maybe silicon oil) getting on the nib which prevented ink from sticking or stick well.

 

I recommend that you not start with a supper flexible nib. They are so easy to flex that they can be difficult to write with. As Randal said, a G nib (Nikko, Zebra, Tachikawa) is a good starting nib. The G nib is my standard nib. Once you are comfortable with it, then graduate to the more flexible nibs.

 

Important, you MUST prepare the nib for writing. What this means is to clean off any manufacturing oils and gunk from the nib. I wipe the nib with rubbing alcohol (inert ingredient = water), other use toothpaste, or a match for a few seconds, or ...

 

As for ink, I got Higgins Eternal ink after advice here, and it is soooo much better than the Speedball ink that I had been using.

But you can also use regular fountain pen inks. I usually use FP ink with my dip pen when writing letters.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one each Hunt 99-100-101 that when an earth quake happens in California the nibs flex in the cup.

I do live in Germany. The nib still flexes in the Cup. They make a wet noodle look uncooked.

 

I have Sonnecken and a few others.....those are much more than wet noodles also, but not in the Hunt 99-100-101 or Gillette 303/404 range.

 

I'd suggest working your way up to the true super duper flex of the those Hunts mentioned. There are other Hunt or Esterbrook nibs that have less flex. Brause also.

You can smooth the nibs so they are not too scratchy.

 

An oblique holder better than the Speed ball is something you need if right handed like mentioned. That is not a place to save $10.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Zebra G and the Brause Blue Pumpkin are both really easy to use nibs with a lot of flex. An iron gall ink such as Diamine Registrars will show off the line variation better than standard fountain pen inks. A smooth paper such as Rhodia will help to prevent the nibs from snagging. And a simple straight holder such as those in the videos I've linked to will feel most natural if you're transitioning from fountain pens. Oblique holders make slanted calligraphy easier - but you're not obliged to learn calligraphy just because you're using a dip pen!

http://i.imgur.com/utQ9Ep9.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

If you're interested in truly learning copperplate, or even if you just think you might, print out one of the guideline sheets that include the lines and angles. It makes a huge difference, especially as you're trying to get consistent.

 

If you're not that interested in calligraphy, but just want to have thick and thin lines in your writing (shaded writing), then you don't need, and probably don't really want, one of the super-flex pens. A vintage nib like one of the flexible falcon nibs from Esterbrook, or my current favorite, the Spencerian Forty (#40) Falcon which give you just enough thick while also being durable, easy for a beginning and smooth.

 

An example of that kind of writing as opposed to the full-on flexing for copperplate.

 

fpn_1440172526__cats_quote.jpg

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're interested in truly learning copperplate, or even if you just think you might, print out one of the guideline sheets that include the lines and angles. It makes a huge difference, especially as you're trying to get consistent.

 

If you're not that interested in calligraphy, but just want to have thick and thin lines in your writing (shaded writing), then you don't need, and probably don't really want, one of the super-flex pens. A vintage nib like one of the flexible falcon nibs from Esterbrook, or my current favorite, the Spencerian Forty (#40) Falcon which give you just enough thick while also being durable, easy for a beginning and smooth.

 

An example of that kind of writing as opposed to the full-on flexing for copperplate.

 

fpn_1440172526__cats_quote.jpg

Just curious, what is the scale of your writing AAAndrew (i.e, how big are your letters 10cm tall)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was written in a Black 'n Red spiral bound notebook. It's called "standard rule" but can't find specific measurements. Can't measure at the moment.

 

The guide I made for myself does use a 10mm line height. I'm trying to develop a way to write at this small scale. The big problem I have at the moment is keeping the shading thinner but still have it there.

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37784
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      30907
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25595
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Matthew TWP
      @Ruaidhri This was an absolutely wonderful bit of writing, and I hope that you're able to maintain the style once all of the medications are out of your system.  Take care and recover quickly!
    • Dr.X
      Very punny daniel
    • danielfalgerho
      These comments make me sad as I sympathise with Ruaidhri, having great difficulties in being taken seriously. Or being taken at all (no off-colors jokes, please!) In spite of overwhelming odds,  Ruaidhri -now I know how to spell it- made a courageous decision and stuck to it. I was diagnosed with a similar growth in a place I will not reveal. Oh, well, if you insist it was Mount Sinai Hospital. But I firmly intend to walk in Ruaidhri's footsteps, if he will let me, on my next visit to Dublin.
    • ParramattaPaul
      Reminds me of the day my associates and I developed a cure for all mankind's ills and mistakenly wrote it down with invisible ink.
    • AnneD
      Was that the end of the Laboratory? Somehow the exactitude created a fully destructive device, as always!
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Expiring Soon

    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
  • Random Adverts

  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. amper
      amper
      (53 years old)
    2. AndrewCooper
      AndrewCooper
      (65 years old)
    3. anuvratfpn
      anuvratfpn
      (27 years old)
    4. bittersweetfarm
      bittersweetfarm
      (59 years old)
    5. caranacas
      caranacas
      (33 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...