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Sheaffer 440 Feed Issue Can't Remove Section


m2squad120th
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Ok, I looked at some discussions of how to remove the feed section and all from a Sheaffer 440 and I was going to give it a go. The feed on my NOS Sheaffer is off center to the point that it is not even touching the left side tine of the nib where the feed ends. The nib is a little scratchy and I thought this may be the problem.

 

Well here's what happened. Of course I can remove the barrel from the section and the converter from the pen, but that's it. I cannot remove the metal section (with the threading) from the nib to get at the feed. This is the first time I have ever tried to work on a pen and there has to be some secret I am missing. I assume they are standard right handed threads into the nib and all so if anyone can give me some advise I could really use it. Thanks!

Edited by m2squad120th
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  • Ron Z

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Sheaffer used a heat sensitive adhesive to hold the thread bushing in the section. You have to warm the section over the threads to take the bushing out. These aren't difficult to do, but there is a zone to aim for. If you don't have enough heat you can crack the section, too much and you can melt the plastic. You should replace the 0-ring before reassembly, and use something like thread sealant to secure the threads in place when you put it all back together. This is one place where you can get away with a dab of shellac. Don't slather it on, or you'll never get the section apart again.

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Cool, that answered my other question, do I need to re seal it. Thanks a lot. It doesn't sound like a big job but it sounds like something I don't want to mess up. Just have to decide if I want to dive into my new pen just to see if the feed being off center is causing the problem. One question though, will a drop or two of fingernail polish do the trick? I have used it before to secure screws and seal primers before so I was just curious.

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I'm not Ron, but I can assure you that he would say not to use fingernail polish. You only want to use something that will allow the pen to be taken apart again. Both thread sealant (Ron has the best) or a dab of shellac can be loosened again with the application of heat. Fingernail polish is likely to be far too permanent.

 

John

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Nail polish usually has has acetone in it as a solvent, which can react with and melt the plastic of the section. Not that it will turn into a puddle of melted plastic, but it can harm the inside of the section, or mar the finish on the outside if it comes in contact with a bit stray nail polish.

 

The short answer therefore is, no.

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Don't be so sure that your off center feed is causing the scratchiness. We've seen 1,000s of 330s and 440s and many have imperfectly centered feeds which aren't bad enough to cause any issues. I would go thru a rigorous tine adjusting process to see if the alignment can be improved, before taking the nib apart. That being said, they are actually pretty easy to disassemble with a little heat.

 

Teri

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Don't be so sure that your off center feed is causing the scratchiness. We've seen 1,000s of 330s and 440s and many have imperfectly centered feeds which aren't bad enough to cause any issues. I would go thru a rigorous tine adjusting process to see if the alignment can be improved, before taking the nib apart. That being said, they are actually pretty easy to disassemble with a little heat.

 

Teri

 

Ok, that's one of the things I was wondering about too. I'm not too keen on tearing it apart if I don't have too. I have a geology loupe around here somewhere and before I re-ink it I may just check out the tines and see if it really is straight. Thanks Teri!

 

Ron, and Bama, this is the reason I post on forums like this, to get expert advise. I was thinking like a gunsmith not a pensmith :) These are a lot more delicate that what I usually work wuith so different rules apply :)

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As an update. Yesterday I dried the pen out and with trembling hand (fingernail) went to adjust the tine that looked too high. This morning I re-inked it and tested it. It it smooth and works great now. May even be a touch wetter. It's even smooth on a Post-it note (which is apparently the worst paper in the world) It is like night and day different. Thanks Teri for the suggestion (and the pen ;) ). I think I will wait as long as possible before I tak this one apart. If it works this well I don't need to go messing around with it any more !!!!

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  • 2 months later...

glad this worked, im having some issues with my 440, always seams to have hard starting and skips. i also got my 440 from teri along with a parker 51, the 51 is my favorite pen by far, i just have to get the 440 working so i can get a rotation going.

Cheers

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