Jump to content

Noodlers Ahab (Flex Nib) Fountain Pen Review



Recommended Posts

Looks like the t2mr guys have posted one more review, this time of a very popular pen called Noodlers Ahab. I just received it in my inbox. Didn't know Noodlers Ahab is made in India. Its called Kanwrite Heritage Flex Pen, it seems.

 

I did check the seller's shop on ebay and he has this pen in a range of colors.

 

Btw, here is the review:

 

 

I don't understand one thing. These guys call themselves 'the two minute reviews', but this review is of 9 minutes :eureka: . Nonetheless, i love their style of review :thumbup: .

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 37
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Manalto

    9

  • snehsab

    5

  • Markthetruck

    3

  • J85909266

    3

Markthetruck

I have many customers looking to try flex pens because of what they've seen on Youtube. Inevitably they buy a noodlers and then come asking about flex. Flex is early Watermans, flex is pre carbon paper; when average correspondence was meant to convey a body language that could not be viewed face to face. The care and flourish conveyed in a well written correspondence added to the text and gave the recipient a sense of the intimacy that was intended by the writer.
The Noodlers flex is a cumbersome thing; one intended for technocrats intent on performing calligraphic acrobatics for those easily impressed.
I do appreciate the renewed interest fostered by the availability of this instrument; but I fear it is so poor a representation of the art as to disenchant more than it inspires.

Gnothi Seauton

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have many customers looking to try flex pens because of what they've seen on Youtube. Inevitably they buy a noodlers and then come asking about flex. Flex is early Watermans, flex is pre carbon paper; when average correspondence was meant to convey a body language that could not be viewed face to face. The care and flourish conveyed in a well written correspondence added to the text and gave the recipient a sense of the intimacy that was intended by the writer.

The Noodlers flex is a cumbersome thing; one intended for technocrats intent on performing calligraphic acrobatics for those easily impressed.

I do appreciate the renewed interest fostered by the availability of this instrument; but I fear it is so poor a representation of the art as to disenchant more than it inspires.

Please, tell me more about the golden age of fountain pens. :rolleyes:

 

Yeah, we know that a Noodler's flex is not a 1930s Waterman. Thanks for being so condescending regarding an age you never participated in.

Fountain pens forever and forever a hundred years fountain pens, all day long forever, forever a hundred times, over and over Fountain Pen Network Adventures dot com!

 

- Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites
Markthetruck

Please, tell me more about the golden age of fountain pens. :rolleyes:

 

Yeah, we know that a Noodler's flex is not a 1930s Waterman. Thanks for being so condescending regarding an age you never participated in.

You are aware that was a response to a review, not a personal attack on your fragile ego?

Gnothi Seauton

Link to post
Share on other sites

...it is so poor a representation of the art as to disenchant more than it inspires.

 

You're far too kind. It's a fraud.

James

Link to post
Share on other sites

With all due respect, most of the people who use fountain pens don't use it for flex and to learn the art of flex writing. Even the guy in the review is using a flex pen for the first time. So, expecting him to write like a pro would be asking for too much. Maybe he is an enthusiast himself, who wants to learn on the way. I think such videos will encourage people to not try to learn this art, but to feel inclined towards it.

 

And ofcourse, waterman pens are so much better than Noodles and other reasonable flex pens. But, like i said, they are reasonable. So, its more like a starting point for someone who is interested in flex and flex writing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

it is indeed!!

 

So, you are saying that a new fountain pen user should, rather starting off with a starter pen, jump directly onto the heavyweights?

 

What you are saying is right, but the reality is broader and bigger :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of stating the obvious, a starter pen for learning to write with a flexible nib requires a responsive, flexible nib. Wouldn't a dip pen provide that as cheaply as an 'Ahab' doesn't?

James

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here we go again... I agree with what you say about the Ahab, It is like flexing a steel girder... However, someone buying a Noodler's Ahab typically does not have the $150+ required to buy a true vintage flex pen.

 

I know you can get some semi-flex for less, but it is always the classic E-Bay gamble; will I get an actual working pen? or something that craps out after one use?

 

There are better, cheap pens out there to try with, but let's not let our ego's and bank balances ruin everyone elses day guys 'n' gals... How about this, instead of attacking someone product, try suggesing an affordable alternative that you think is better value for money.

 

And to lead by example, I will do just that. For $12.00 USD you can buy a Jinhao 159; then additional $25.00 USD you can buy a 10 pack of Zebra G Ti dip pen nibs. With a little work and a lot of care, you can fit the Zebra G Ti nib into the Jinhao 159. The feed keeps up well and the nib does what a dip pen nib does, in addition due to the titanium nitride coating, it will not rust like a standard steel nib and has a much longer nib life (and you have a packof 10, so they will last a while!).

 

Relax and enjoy your shoes people ;)

Sam O

"A fountain pen with a bad nib is like a Ferrari with a flat tyre..." - Brian Gray, Edison pens

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are aware that was a response to a review, not a personal attack on your fragile ego?

I didn't take it personally. I have no interest in flex writing. I just found your post obnoxiously pretentious.

Fountain pens forever and forever a hundred years fountain pens, all day long forever, forever a hundred times, over and over Fountain Pen Network Adventures dot com!

 

- Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites

... try suggesing an affordable alternative that you think is better value for money ...

 

For flex purposes please consider dip nibs and dip nib holders. They cost from one to a few dollars a piece and have proven themselves to be very effective for flexible writing and flexible drawing for more than 165 years. No gimmicks, no false hopes, not substandard products, but the real flex deal at the most affordable price point!

Tu Amigo!

Mauricio Aguilar

 

www.VintagePen.net

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3525/4051556482_36f28f0902_m.jpg

E-Mail: VintagePen@att.net

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

For flex purposes please consider dip nibs and dip nib holders. They cost from one to a few dollars a piece and have proven themselves to be very effective for flexible writing and flexible drawing for more than 165 years. No gimmicks, no false hopes, not substandard products, but the real flex deal at the most affordable price point!

 

Gee, I wish I had thought of that.

 

Wouldn't a dip pen provide that as cheaply as an 'Ahab' doesn't?

James

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

For flex purposes please consider dip nibs and dip nib holders. They cost from one to a few dollars a piece and have proven themselves to be very effective for flexible writing and flexible drawing for more than 165 years. No gimmicks, no false hopes, not substandard products, but the real flex deal at the most affordable price point!

Sadly not pocket portable for everyday use and practice :(

Sam O

"A fountain pen with a bad nib is like a Ferrari with a flat tyre..." - Brian Gray, Edison pens

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly not pocket portable for everyday use and practice :(

Absolutely, if you are looking for EFFECTIVE flex writing instruments that can go in your pocket you must fill your pocket with some money first :)

Tu Amigo!

Mauricio Aguilar

 

www.VintagePen.net

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3525/4051556482_36f28f0902_m.jpg

E-Mail: VintagePen@att.net

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly not pocket portable for everyday use and practice :(

 

At what point did portability become a requirement, sadly or otherwise? Isn't one ordinarily in one's home every day? (It's often a good place to use pens and practice penmanship.)

James

Link to post
Share on other sites
Markthetruck

At the risk of stating the obvious, a starter pen for learning to write with a flexible nib requires a responsive, flexible nib. Wouldn't a dip pen provide that as cheaply as an 'Ahab' doesn't?

Well said. I had no idea this was such a touchy subject!

Or is it just the state?(sorry Joe)

Gnothi Seauton

Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries. I honestly have no idea why I snapped at you about it.

Fountain pens forever and forever a hundred years fountain pens, all day long forever, forever a hundred times, over and over Fountain Pen Network Adventures dot com!

 

- Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad that the issue has been resolved.

 

And guys, those who have come from the ball point pen background, don't like a dip pens at all. It's a big turn off for them. And honestly, most of them don't look for a flex pen at all. Its videos from SBRE, Matt and now this guy, that generates the level of curiosity. Now i assume, even this guy in the review can't afford such heavyweight pens. Even this pen has been gifted to him. And like he said, its the first flex pen that he is trying.

 

So, i think in the coming time even he will review expensive and better flex pens. But all that takes time. And that is the case with everything, not just pens.

 

But i agree with Manalto, serious flex pen lovers should go ahead with the dip pens, than Ahab.. But, Ahab is not just a flex pen. Its an equally fine normal writer. And god, its ED capacity is HUGE.

Edited by snehsab
Link to post
Share on other sites

But, Ahab is not just a flex pen. Its an equally fine normal writer.

 

Maybe they have changed the 'Ahab' since I bought mine, for which the phrase "equally fine" would only come into service sarcastically. It has a slight bit of spring in the nib but requires far too much pressure to make it flex. My experience is validated by the numerous discussions here by those who have tried to correct the problem. I would think that someone new to flex pens who's unequipped for such adjustments might blame himself for the pen's inadequacies and get discouraged. That's why I wouldn't recommend it for someone hoping to learn flex writing. It is more convenient to carry around than a dip pen and bottle of ink; I'll give it that.

James

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...