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Sheaffer Imperial/triumph 727 Or 777?


Snargle
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I just received this pen via an online auction and I'm trying to pin down the identity. It's a Sheaffer, cartridge/squeeze converter, "Gold Electroplated", "Sheaffer Made in U.S.A.", nib is inlaid 585 14K gold. I think I have it narrowed down to either an Imperial 727 or 777. The differences between the two models isn't clear to me. Any help would be appreciated.

IMG_2709.jpg

 

IMG_2711.jpg

Edited by Snargle

Larry

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A 797, the deeper groves are the pointer to sorting this from a 727.

Harry, without a side-by-side comparison, how can you tell the deeper grooves from the shallow? Having seen neither one, I don't have a point of reference.

 

We find the long diamond inlaid nibs more commonly on 777s ...

Teri, since the 777s are either 12K rolled gold or 12K gold filled, I don't think this one is a 777. Mine is marked "Gold Electroplated."

Edited by Snargle

Larry

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Duh! I had forgotten that I have the 1991 Sheaffer catalog scanned on my web site:

 

http://www.peytonstreetpens.com/resources/pen-resources/sheaffer-1992-white-dot-catalog-page-2/

 

I think you must indeed have the 797. (I can't remember Harry being wrong, but my memory is not to be trusted.) The wider ribbing (when compared to the 777), and the nib is the same as yours, the short V-inlay:

 

http://www.peytonstreet.com/pens/sheaffer/sheaffer92cat/sheaf_92cat_triumph1.jpg

 

TERI

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Great! Thank you, Teri. I'm listing it in my collection database as a 797. If anyone disagrees, they can take it up with you! :lol:

 

BTW, just took the pen to my homeowner's association board meeting tonight. It's delightful...both in performance and appearance. The all-gold body is a little flashy, but what the heck? The only person's opinion I'm concerned about is mine...and I think it looks great!

Larry

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Thank you Terri !! Unfortunately I can confirm your memory isn't to be trusted, I make plenty of mistakes !!

 

Snargle, the difference becomes apparent with experience as they do all look basically the same. There are two nib shapes in these gold models, the one like your pen has and a long diamond that Terri mentions, yours is the later nib shape ( ~'1980(?) and later). The 797 continued into '90's ( with a break of a few ears in the '80's) so the nib shapes increases the chance of being a 797 as well. I'm glad you like it, I use a 797 as a regular carry pen because it's high quality, good to use and relatively inexpensive to replace if lost. I also use a very well worn 777 as a home pen.

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An interesting side note to this acquisition. On Sunday morning, I was at a local (Pennsylvania) flea market and found another copy of the same pen! The seller originally asked $20 for it, but then noticed it had a 14K nib and upped her price to $50! Although it's a nice pen, I didn't think the amount of gold in that 14K nib was worth an additional $30! I walked away from that deal. :lol:

Larry

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  • 5 months later...

Resurrecting this thread to share a pen I found at an antique shop today. It's gorgeous and after some googling I'm pretty sure it's a Sheaffer 777. The cap says 12k GF (checked with loupe, not GP but GF) then a crown, and Sheaffer USA. The nib says Sheaffer 14k and looks like what I think is called the long diamond inlaid nib? It's got an empty Sheaffer Skrip cartridge in it; well, it did, before I took it all apart and put it in a nice lukewarm soapy bath. :)

 

23432337519_50f2b65083_n.jpgsheaffer1 by dixiehellcat, on Flickr

 

23173460563_f99bbd3bbe_n.jpgsheaffer2 by dixiehellcat, on Flickr

 

23774153876_0faffc05ca_n.jpgsheaffer4 by dixiehellcat, on Flickr

 

Do y'all think the converter that Goulet sells would fit this? :)

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What model would be this one with the long diamond inlaid 14k nib:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pen is on offer for sale on a local auction site. Pictures are provided by the seller.

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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What model would be this one with the long diamond inlaid 14k nib:

 

 

The pen is on offer for sale on a local auction site. Pictures are provided by the seller.

 

If that is the barleycorn pattern then likely an 827.

 

My Website

 

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If that is the barleycorn pattern then likely an 827.

Jar , I have checked the reference cited above ( sheaffertarga.com) . The 827 has the short inlaid nib and not the long diamond inlaid nib.

Khan M. Ilyas

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Resurrecting this thread to share a pen I found at an antique shop today. It's gorgeous and after some googling I'm pretty sure it's a Sheaffer 777. The cap says 12k GF (checked with loupe, not GP but GF) then a crown, and Sheaffer USA. The nib says Sheaffer 14k and looks like what I think is called the long diamond inlaid nib? It's got an empty Sheaffer Skrip cartridge in it; well, it did, before I took it all apart and put it in a nice lukewarm soapy bath. :)

 

23432337519_50f2b65083_n.jpgsheaffer1 by dixiehellcat, on Flickr

 

23173460563_f99bbd3bbe_n.jpgsheaffer2 by dixiehellcat, on Flickr

 

23774153876_0faffc05ca_n.jpgsheaffer4 by dixiehellcat, on Flickr

 

Do y'all think the converter that Goulet sells would fit this? :)

 

777

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Jar , I have checked the reference cited above ( sheaffertarga.com) . The 827 has the short inlaid nib and not the long diamond inlaid nib.

 

As Jar says, an 827. The nib shape can be either because the long diamond was replaced with the short inlaid, all it means is that yours in an earlier model than the reference site's pen.

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As Jar says, an 827. The nib shape can be either because the long diamond was replaced with the short inlaid, all it means is that yours in an earlier model than the reference site's pen.

Yes , that may be the case. Thank you jar and thank you H.Harry. I have bought the pen and it is on its to its new home.

Khan M. Ilyas

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  • 1 month later...

>> When it comes to these gold fluted Sheaffer, what does the different fluting patterns (groups of 4 lines / 8 lines) and the difference in end shape (rounded end or squared off >> end) mean? Does it make them different models to each other, or just different versions of the same model number?

 

 

Oh, I think I see my confusion. Have just seen the 2797 with 8 line pattern.

Edited by LizB
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  • 3 years later...

Hi I've got an Imperial 777 and I couldn't see what the difference was between that and the 727. According to Sheaffer guide the 727 is gold plated and the 777 is gold filled. I didn't understand the difference so I looked it up and this is what I found on a jewelry web site https://www.tiffanyanne.jewelry/pages/metal-guide The author gives a good explanation of the difference between plated and filled gold .

 

"Gold filled is the next level and is an amazing, quality alternative to solid gold. Gold plating or vermeil is the lower level and these items tend to tarnish and can often times turn the skin green. I never use anything less the gold-fill or solid gold in my designs.

What is Gold Fill?

It's an actual layer of gold-pressure bonded to another metal. Gold filled is not to be confused with gold plating as filled literally has 100% more gold than gold plating. Gold filled is much more valuable and tarnish resistant. It does not flake off, rub off or turn colors. As a matter of fact, anyone who can wear gold can wear gold filled without worries of any allergic reaction to the jewelry. Gold filled jewelry is an economical alternative to solid gold."

Edited by Jazzajon
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