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Have You Ever Seen This On A Sheaffer Tuckaway?


ThegreatandpowerfullR
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The plastic seems to have turned green or something, and either ink formed a gunk (I think I see some in the top of the feed) or the plastic did. The brown inside the barrel appeared to be red or brown, and the gunk grey. The feed also seems to be split, and sticks further out than the other tuckaway (a post-war one)

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Edited by ThegreatandpowerfullR

If anybody wants to buy a FPR triveni, a waterman's crusader with a modified barrel, or faber castell pitt brush pens I have one just for you!

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I'd call it a mess and get a new set of parts from the parts bin.

Even the nib looks wrinkled.

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The nib has two small dents that you ca see in the photos, but the rest looks very polished and (hopefully) works well.

If anybody wants to buy a FPR triveni, a waterman's crusader with a modified barrel, or faber castell pitt brush pens I have one just for you!

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Could be whatever some past repairer used for thread sealant some whatever to get the nib to stick to the feed. It may be you need a new feed, or it will be an interesting restoration.

 

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Is the plastic supposed to be green though?

If anybody wants to buy a FPR triveni, a waterman's crusader with a modified barrel, or faber castell pitt brush pens I have one just for you!

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Putting aside the dents in the nib, everything looks fine to me. The collar are usually black but do show-up in colors sometimes. The feed extension is nothing unusual, the "split" is a channel which I guess is supposed to drain the feed when the pen is nib up.

 

The gunk on the threads looks like rubber cement, thread sealent looks different (shinny). Remove all the traces of it and use thread sealant to put the nib back in the section once the pen restored to proper working order.

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Looks like someone tried to glue the nib back on the threaded coupling (collar).

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Looks like someone tried to glue the nib back on the threaded coupling (collar).

 

I'm thinking that it could be one of those Triumph nibs that's swaged on, rather than threaded. I have one of those, and it just won't stay attached to the section. As I understand it, glue won't work.

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I'm thinking that it could be one of those Triumph nibs that's swaged on, rather than threaded. I have one of those, and it just won't stay attached to the section. As I understand it, glue won't work.

 

I've epoxied them on after filing down the collar, but the results aren't great. The nibs seem dry. I need to find a way to get the feed and nib right--not too loose, not too tight. I've just done it twice and bith pens were a litttle dry--not enjoyable to use.

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Putting aside the dents in the nib, everything looks fine to me. The collar are usually black but do show-up in colors sometimes. The feed extension is nothing unusual, the "split" is a channel which I guess is supposed to drain the feed when the pen is nib up.

 

The gunk on the threads looks like rubber cement, thread sealent looks different (shinny). Remove all the traces of it and use thread sealant to put the nib back in the section once the pen restored to proper working order.

What type of thread sealant will I need? I have shellac and silicone grease, but neither are supposed to be used for something like this I think.

If anybody wants to buy a FPR triveni, a waterman's crusader with a modified barrel, or faber castell pitt brush pens I have one just for you!

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  • 7 months later...

24561810742_e6aa231381_z.jpg

 

I have the same question - how best to attach the nib to the threaded coupling unit. I hesitate to use epoxy but I previously tried - with this pen - thread sealant and shellac. The thread sealant was not holding the nib as firmly as I wished I was concerned that over time the nib would loosen and need to be reworked. Perhaps I did not let it sit long enough.

 

I cleaned it up and tried the shellac and that seemed better and while a bit messy to apply was not too bad. I've no experience with longevity though although I test wrote a page and all seemed fine.

 

The pen is apart and cleaned once again as I decided to replace the packing unit as it was not good as I expected and could not be rejuvenated. Not wishing to work on this pen again, I'm wondering what is the best method for attaching the nib.

 

Thanks.

 

 

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Swage the nib in place.

San Francisco International Pen Show - The next great pen show is on schedule for August 27-28-29, 2021. If we all do what we need to do...you can Book your travel and tables and make SF 2021 the Return. 
 

 My PM box is usually full. Just email me: my last name at the google mail address.

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Swage the nib in place.

 

You make that sound so easy.

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The nib in the post above is one of the pressed on units. The one shown by the OP may or may not be pressed on (some are threaded) - but there wasn't anything wrong with it that I can see, just left over sealant sticking to the collar that needed to be cleaned off.

 

Be nice to the nib - they're getting to be harder to find. The OP's nib is from an early Triumph pen, and has a multi-lead (start) thread that is incompatible with any of the later Triumph nibs.

 

As Todd noted, the best way to secure the nib is to swage, and then roll the back end over to secure it. Second best is to use a high quality epoxy to secure it. Note that Devcon 5 minute epoxy does not qualify as "hi quality." I recommend PC Superepoxy or 3M DP-420. Expect to pay $10 or more for the first one, and around $30 or more for the later. They are worth it.

 

Rough up both the inside end of the nib and the nib mount just a bit with 220 sandpaper, then apply the epoxy to the mount not the nib so that the excess epoxy is pushed out of the nib where you can wipe it off, and not down into the nib and feed. Allow to cure completely, which is usually 24 hours at 70 F. Warming to 120 degrees can shorten the cure time significantly. Look at the application data sheets.

 

The BEST thing to do is to send the nib or the pen to someone who has the tools or experience to fix the nib. Someday we'll run out of nibs and other parts to throw at a pen.

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Thanks, Ron. That is good to know. I will take another look at the pen and think how best to approach it. I may send it in as you suggest although it would be good to know how to fix it myself. I'm happy to learn.

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