Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Sheaffer Jr. Nib Removal


Kilroy
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm hoping one of you kind, knowledgeable people can shed light on nib removal. I have a Sheaffer Jr. which I was told is from '35-'36 I think (just going off memory). I haven't had much success finding info on these, I'll include a picture. I want to remove the nib and feed to align them better, the nib is a bit crooked. Is it a friction fit that I can just pull out? Or is there some other strategy? I tried just pulling and twisting a bit but I didn't want to put too much force into it not knowing what would result. Other than putting a new sac in it I know nothing about vintage pens.

http://i.imgur.com/Q2QrPnA.jpg?1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 5
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Ron Z

    1

  • rtrinkner

    2

  • lahlahlaw

    1

  • Kilroy

    2

To do the job right, you'll want a "knock-out block," a small dowel, and a small hammer. Open up the pen with heat as you normally would to change the sac. Then place the section (with nib) nib down into a suitable hole in the knock-out block, insert a properly fitting dowel into the back of the section, and tap away with the small hammer (gently) until the nib and feed fall through the knock-out block. It's a good idea to soak the nib/section in a gentle ammonia solution or ultrasound bath to loosen the dried ink.

 

A variety of web site sell these knock-out blocks for around $25.

 

While you have the nib and feed out of the section, be sure to clean the feed carefully. An old toothbrush and the corners of small squares of .2mm brash shim are good for removing gunked up ink from the little ink channels on the top of the feed (side immediately under the nib).

 

Putting the nib and feed back into the section can be easy or tough, depending on the model and individual pen. A lot of people make a small pencil mark on the section at the center of the nib so that you can put the nib/feed back into the section exactly where they had been before. To insert the nib/feed, there are a few different techniques. I lay the nib on top of the feed as I want it to end up, and then use a cloth to grab the nib/feed with my fingers and push it into the section. Some times you have to use a fair amount of force, which always worries me, as I've buckled a few nibs in the process. Some people use nylon pliers to grasp the nib/feed.

 

Sheaffer used a friction fit for feeds of this vintage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your detailed reply. I'll follow your advice.

 

I wonder why they would use such tight tolerances when I think of the modern pens I have with friction fit nibs/feeds which are relatively easy to work with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dunno. Could be that modern pens' feeds are far more complex and able to store "excess" ink better than vintage nibs. The feeds on most vintage pens are essentially oblong blobs of hard rubber, with a thin channel on the top to deliver ink to the nib. A lot of modern feeds have complex fans radiating from the center or complex ink collectors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A solid dowel might not work as many of these Sheaffers' feeds have a 'thingy' that extends Art the way to the back of the feed. I use a hollow steel tube to reach the rear of the feed without damaging this extended part.

@arts_nibs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In most cases I do not use a solid rod or dowel. A metal rod will be much more effective because it is not "elastic" and does not compress like wood does when hit. A piece of brake line tubing is ideal, and works on most pens including Parker Vacumatics. Sheaffer used a metal tube with a slit cut down the side. I saw one in the service center fountain pen repair station when I was there, and have copied it.

 

Instructions on how to make a knockout block, punches and more can be found starting here.

spacer.png
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...