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Eboya Pens?


Namo
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The large nib is for their oversized pen.

 

Yesterday's visit was very short, no time to play with the toys. It was just to check on the progress of the repair of a pen I dropped off a while ago and to drop off three others I did not have time to my last visit because I was playing with the pens.

 

The shop is small, tidy and very nice. They have a large number of their pens laid out on a large wooden table in the center. They also sell pen rests and trays made of ebonite. I bought a pen rest my first visit.

 

I have not bought one of their pens but they are on my wish list. I am especially interested in their ink shut off eye dropper.

 

Is large the oversized? or there a different oversized?

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The large nib is for their oversized pen.

 

Yesterday's visit was very short, no time to play with the toys. It was just to check on the progress of the repair of a pen I dropped off a while ago and to drop off three others I did not have time to my last visit because I was playing with the pens.

 

The shop is small, tidy and very nice. They have a large number of their pens laid out on a large wooden table in the center. They also sell pen rests and trays made of ebonite. I bought a pen rest my first visit.

 

I have not bought one of their pens but they are on my wish list. I am especially interested in their ink shut off eye dropper.

 

Dear TinJapan, exactly where is the shop located?

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I like the look but the stock Bock nib is a killer for me :( is that wrong?

I agree that having Eboya or their logo stamped on the nib would be aesthetically more pleasing but Eboya pens look nice enough and, with the Japanese eyedropper filling system, I'm wiling to overlook the generic-looking nibs.

Edited by rpsyed
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Tinjapan, Eboya models only come in 2 or 3 sizes, so how do the 5 different nibs get split up? Some get the Smaller 3 and some get the larger 3?

Edited by rpsyed
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Dear TinJapan, exactly where is the shop located?

The closest station is 荒川一中前, Arakawa ichumae, or it may be ichomae on the Arakawa denser. On the Hibiya line, Minowa station is about a ten minute walk from the shop, which between these two stations.

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Tinjapan, Eboya models only come in 2 or 3 sizes, so how do the 5 different nibs get split up? Some get the Smaller 3 and some get the larger 3?

Their regular production pens come in three sizes but they also turn bespoke pens. I believe the smallest and largest nibs are available for such pens.

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Is large the oversized? or there a different oversized?

As I understand it, the oversized pen is either a special order or perhaps the large of one or more of their models. I originally thought the former but after thinking about all the conversation I have had with the various people working there, the latter may also be true.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just figured I'd post this for anyone looking for the #8 380 Bock nib on an Eboya since info on them seems scarce. I emailed Eboya in Japan asking what size the nib the large size pens had and if a 380 size nib was available. This is their response:

 

Thank you for your mail.
The regular size of large Eboya pen is 250 Bock nib.
We have some 380F nibs now, but they are very few.
( F only. No M/B.)
The large sizes of the styles Houga and Hakobune can have 380 nibs.
The other styles doesn't.
A pen with 380 nib is build-to-order. The delivery time is 5 months
from the advance payment.


Regards,
Yoshiko Endo
Eboya / NIKKO EBONITE

Edited by rpsyed
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  • 8 months later...

Do these pens really take 6 months to make, given that they are not even Urushi coated? Or are they? Its unfair to consider the time to make the ebonite that is used to make the pens, IMO.

 

Why is the price so high? Is it just for the eye dropper shut off mechanism? As far as I can think, the shut off mechanism will not prevent burping.

A custom ebonite pen from Scriptorium or Edison costs half as much and the custom ones from Fosfor or other makers from India cost a fifth. All are "handmade" right? (though Edison does use a CNC). Gold nibs raises the price by about $70 at least. And Eboyas don't even offer specialty nibs like Sailor does, it's just a regular 14K/18K generic Bock nib.

 

Can someone shed some light on this?

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Do these pens really take 6 months to make, given that they are not even Urushi coated? Or are they? Its unfair to consider the time to make the ebonite that is used to make the pens, IMO.

 

Why is the price so high? Is it just for the eye dropper shut off mechanism? As far as I can think, the shut off mechanism will not prevent burping.

A custom ebonite pen from Scriptorium or Edison costs half as much and the custom ones from Fosfor or other makers from India cost a fifth. All are "handmade" right? (though Edison does use a CNC). Gold nibs raises the price by about $70 at least. And Eboyas don't even offer specialty nibs like Sailor does, it's just a regular 14K/18K generic Bock nib.

 

Can someone shed some light on this?

 

I think the six months is just part of their marketing, but they do mean the making of the ebonite. These are raw ebonite pens, no urushi. The shut off mechanism is really cool and useful, but the price is very high, indeed.

 

As far as burping is concerned, Eboya pens have custom-made ebonite feed. They look oversize in photos, so it's possible that burping is unlikely, but I have no first-hand experience to share.

 

Eboya pens do look attractive to me, and the C/C price seems justified. Right now, though, I am thoroughly enjoying Indian ebonite pens, so Eboya will have to wait.

---

Please, visit my website at http://www.acousticpens.com/

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Do these pens really take 6 months to make, given that they are not even Urushi coated? Or are they? Its unfair to consider the time to make the ebonite that is used to make the pens, IMO.

 

Why is the price so high? Is it just for the eye dropper shut off mechanism? As far as I can think, the shut off mechanism will not prevent burping.

A custom ebonite pen from Scriptorium or Edison costs half as much and the custom ones from Fosfor or other makers from India cost a fifth. All are "handmade" right? (though Edison does use a CNC). Gold nibs raises the price by about $70 at least. And Eboyas don't even offer specialty nibs like Sailor does, it's just a regular 14K/18K generic Bock nib.

 

Can someone shed some light on this?

 

I don't know why it takes so long for Eboya to fulfill an order, but it might be fair to say that they have a backlog to fulfill, similar to many other custom pen makers.

 

I don't think Eboya pens are priced out of the market. If one only considers pens with the cartridge/converter filling system, the cost of an Eboya pen is in the same ballpark as a custom pen from Edison. For example, the large Eboya Houga model with a 14K Bock 250 nib is $399 while an Edison Huron with an 18K gold #6 nib is $350.

 

The price only increases when exotic filling systems are considered. Continuing with our example, ordering the large Eboya Houga model with the eyedropper mechanism brings the price to $596 (http://www.nikkoebonite.com/pricelist.pdf), which is about $200 more. Ordering the large Eboya Houga with a button-filling mechanism brings the price to $507. If one orders the Edison Huron with a bulb filling mechanism or even just an ink window, prepare to pay an additional $100 - so $450 total.

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Do these pens really take 6 months to make, given that they are not even Urushi coated? Or are they? Its unfair to consider the time to make the ebonite that is used to make the pens, IMO.

 

Why is the price so high? Is it just for the eye dropper shut off mechanism? As far as I can think, the shut off mechanism will not prevent burping.

A custom ebonite pen from Scriptorium or Edison costs half as much and the custom ones from Fosfor or other makers from India cost a fifth. All are "handmade" right? (though Edison does use a CNC). Gold nibs raises the price by about $70 at least. And Eboyas don't even offer specialty nibs like Sailor does, it's just a regular 14K/18K generic Bock nib.

 

Can someone shed some light on this?

They have a huge back log. There are just two people making the pens and the only mass produced, interchangeable parts are the metal parts. So each part for each pen is handmade to match that pen. Very similar to me older vintage Conklins. It is very hard to find parts that fit even when two pens seem to be exactly the same. They have such a backlog that they have put a hold on their service of making replacement parts for vintage pens until they can get caught up, which makes me sad.

 

Ink shut off or Japanese eye drop filled pens are a lot more complex than a regular eye dropper pen. They have a shaft that penetrates the barrel and thus requires a seal. Further, a valve disc and seat must be fashioned if it is to shut off flow. I have not used one so I can not speak on the burping issue someone asked about.

 

Incidentally, I purchased my very first Eboya Monday at the Maruzen pen fair.

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post-92404-0-65872600-1457055472_thumb.jpeg

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Incidentally, I purchased my very first Eboya Monday at the Maruzen pen fair.

 

It's so pretty! I love that green. Idon'tneedoneIdon'tneedoneIdon'tneedone....

Inquisitive Quill on Instagram and YouTube 

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I have the Namiki Emperor in vermillion finish, and compared to that, eboya prices really seem reasonable at $600.

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I've owned an Eboya eyedropper for several months now. It's been continuously inked since I received it and I can say it's never burped, skipped, or had irregular flow. The feed is ebonite and works very well.

 

Given the price of other modern eyedroppers of similar design, I'd say the Eboya eyedropper pens are a great value.

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They have a huge back log. There are just two people making the pens and the only mass produced, interchangeable parts are the metal parts. So each part for each pen is handmade to match that pen. Very similar to me older vintage Conklins. It is very hard to find parts that fit even when two pens seem to be exactly the same. They have such a backlog that they have put a hold on their service of making replacement parts for vintage pens until they can get caught up, which makes me sad.

Ink shut off or Japanese eye drop filled pens are a lot more complex than a regular eye dropper pen. They have a shaft that penetrates the barrel and thus requires a seal. Further, a valve disc and seat must be fashioned if it is to shut off flow. I have not used one so I can not speak on the burping issue someone asked about.

Incidentally, I purchased my very first Eboya Monday at the Maruzen pen fair.

Congrats! The Kyouka is such an awesome model.

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Can't wait for mine!

 

The only pen I have on order at the moment...

Edited by mongrelnomad

Too many pens; too little writing.

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