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Grading With Your Fountain Pens


LisaN

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It's the end of the semester, and time to post those pictures!

To start things off, here is a page from my exam3 key written on cheapo copy paper, with a Pelikan m800 F, Diamine red dragon ink.

 

post-46058-0-67746000-1430515076_thumb.jpg

 

and

post-46058-0-62146500-1430515432_thumb.jpg

 

Edited by LisaN

Sometimes the cat needs a new cat toy. And sometimes I need a new pen.

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I recently graded 100+ term papers using my Jinhao 159 fitted with a 1.1 stub. After I posted the grades online a student came to see me outraged over her low grade. When she saw the numerous, big, bold, and black markings on her paper she just stammered and left my office!

...............................................................

We Are Our Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

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Amazing how much I glean over the years. I am just a dirt-stopper from

the Geography department. (Climatologist) However, I recognize organic chemistry.

Alcohols ?

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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Diamine red dragon is my favorite grading ink. It's not fire-engine YOU'RE WRONG red. It's not a friendly Iro Ku-jaku or low-key Diamine Bilberry, which might invite argument. The red says, "I'm in charge, so pay attention." The darkness says, "I've been doing this a long time, so listen up when I point out your mistakes." The saturation says, "I mean business. This WILL be on the final."

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I'm not a teacher or perfessor, but I recommend a Lamy Vista with 1.1 mm stub and Diamine Oxblood for grading. :yikes: That'll learn 'em.

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I normally use R&K Verdura for comments: a lot of contrast from blue or black ballpoints or gel pens, even with XF nibs. Waterman Havanna is also a favorite. Marks are always in a waterproof ink.

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It's the end of the semester, and time to post those pictures!

To start things off, here is a page from my exam3 key written on cheapo copy paper, with a Pelikan m800 F, Diamine red dragon ink.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1001.jpg

 

and

attachicon.gifIMG_1005.jpg

 

 

 

Nice. I love your neat alpha glucose. Which makes me want to revise biochem harder now.

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I usually use Nikita for grading but used Blackstone Red Cashmere for most of this year. It's a darker red and handles lousy paper pretty well. It was in a red Estie J with 9668 or 2668 nib. I still used Nikita in a Sheaffer's Sentinel for some papers that went out for moderation. To break the monotony I marked with Cayenne in a lovely vintage Conklin RHR Endura or (for draft work) Daintree Green or Shin-ryoku in whatever struck my fancy at the time.

Dave Campbell
Retired Science Teacher and Active Pen Addict
Every day is a chance to reduce my level of ignorance.

fpn_1425200643__fpn_1425160066__super_pi

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I ask my students which color should I use. Once chosen they agree not to use it in their writings.

Currently I am using green (Pelikan Edelstein Tanzanite)

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I recently graded 100+ term papers using my Jinhao 159 fitted with a 1.1 stub. After I posted the grades online a student came to see me outraged over her low grade. When she saw the numerous, big, bold, and black markings on her paper she just stammered and left my office!

 

NICE! I wish I had been into fountain pens when I was teaching back in the 80s.

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I'm in the middle of this right now. I need a vanishing point, I think. I'm developing repetitive use injury from capping and uncapping.

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This is out finals week, so my papers are already graded. I used Hero Carbon Black ink, so dark and black ,but I can't use the pen if it sits for more than a day as those little carbon particles plug it up. Right now I am experimenting with diluting it but the black is not as satisfactory,

 

I did find a Sailor Black in that is very black. For my own use I have been filing with Private Reserve Ebony Purple, Looks black on first glance but is different enough to give me something unique.

...............................................................

We Are Our Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

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I am using Waterman South Sea Blue, or whatever it is called these days. It is in an old Skyline with a slightly italic and slightly flexible nib. Oh, and the cap has green stripes, so it looks like a Pelikan :D .

 

Dave

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Amazing how much I glean over the years. I am just a dirt-stopper from

the Geography department. (Climatologist) However, I recognize organic chemistry.

Alcohols ?

 

the glucose in 2 is a polyol, and then methanol shows up in the Sandmeyer sequence.

Also, much alcohol is consumed after grading.

 

fully 20% of my chem 2 students believe that our sun is at the center of the milky way.

5% believe it is also at the center of the universe.

Sometimes the cat needs a new cat toy. And sometimes I need a new pen.

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It's funny--I never grade in fountain pens. I use pencil or with a Frixion pen (usually in purple). I teach comp and lit courses.

Edited by cleosmama
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I have been grading and commenting on essays with a needlepoint nib in J. Herbin "Violette Pensee," aka purple, as well as "Lie de The," aka brown. For some reason the purple never generates a reaction but people do find the brown interesting. I still remember hearing students saying, "He writes in brown!"

 

I still don't know why that caused them to talk.

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I have been grading and commenting on essays with a needlepoint nib in J. Herbin "Violette Pensee," aka purple, as well as "Lie de The," aka brown. For some reason the purple never generates a reaction but people do find the brown interesting. I still remember hearing students saying, "He writes in brown!"

 

I still don't know why that caused them to talk.

I think in the real world out there, brown ink is very uncommon. Ballpoints and gel writers seem to come in so many colors, purple, orange, pink, etc, but not brown ink. I remember reading a story of a pen neophyte in London who tried to find a nice fountain pen with a stub nib and converter, and who had unending problems and major costs--which is what happens when one shops at Harrods--but his biggest exclamation was reserved for the brown ink he accidentally purchased. He wasn't happy about it!

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The last year I taught secondary school I used Pelican Violet and a Lamy Safari. Will probably use a nice orange or Montblanc Irish Green next year.

 

 

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Just about to dive into a batch of papers with finals still on the horizon (our academic year doesn't end til mid-June). I'm using Chesterfield Archival Vault, Noodlers 54th Mass, Pilot Black, R&K Scabiosa, and KWZI IG Blue #2--I prefer waterproof or water-resistant inks and decided to include a few iron-gall options in the rotation this time. The dry-ish IG inks also help when I get essays on cheap paper. I used to mark papers exclusively in pencil. After noticing how rarely I actually erased and rewrote a comment, I shifted to fountain pens.

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I have been grading and commenting on essays with a needlepoint nib in J. Herbin "Violette Pensee," aka purple, as well as "Lie de The," aka brown. For some reason the purple never generates a reaction but people do find the brown interesting. I still remember hearing students saying, "He writes in brown!"

 

I still don't know why that caused them to talk.

I wonder if it has not occurred to them that there is such a thing as brown ink. A lot of teachers have been using purple rather than red in recent years, and green is not all that unusual, but perhaps brown is new to them because they haven't seen it much.

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