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Utilitarian-Minded Pen (School) 50-100€


Armand.D

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Hello all,

 

Since october last year I am hooked in Fps, and as an high school student I want now to change my Lamy Safari that I am using since last october.

 

I have tried also a Parker 45, Sailor highace Neo, Fpr triveni Jr (indian pen).

 

I am searching for a pen with :

 

- metal construction by preference (a little tired by it on the safari), more consistent design.

 

- a snap-cap (much more handy to take notes) - not with "friction" as on the P45, which clips immediately.

 

- Not Japanese, because I always found myself confused to find an equivalent to the Lamy F,

 

for me with my usual noodler's qe3 ink (more wet than dry) the Pilot M is not equal to the lamy F, so western is simpler or I need a Japanese broad.

 

About the filling-system, a c/c is fine, even if I have to refill every 2/3 days, the eyedroppers are less clean to refill imho.

 

The evident choice would be a Lamy pen, because of their utilitarian-minded design, but an all-star is too close to a Safari,

 

What do you have to recommend me ?

 

I am open to Chinese, etc, around 100 you can also tell me what's interesting to think to. (classifieds included).

 

Indeed, I am just searching for an "upgrade" to the safari, a more premium-builted one also thinked for an easy and quick usage.. I am confused.

 

About twsbi, there is the Vac 700, but I heard about cracks..

I heard about a "Nexus pen", kickstarter project, all aluminium made, coming with a bock nib..

 

I like the platinum 3776.

 

 

Thank you !

 

Armand.D

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Well, the Al-Star has a metal construction, but it IS essentially the same pen as the Safari (with a few differences)

 

How about the Lamy Studio then? It is a metal pen that comes in a few different colours, which shares the same feed and nib as a Safari, so you can swap nibs around. More info on the pen here: http://www.gouletpens.com/LMY-L65/p/LMY-L65 (no affiliation)

 

Maybe a Pilot Metropolitan (or MR, as it's called in Europe)? The rule of thumb is that Japanese nibs runs a size thinner than their Western counterparts, so a Japanese F would be like a Western EF.

 

For TWSBI, perhaps consider the Diamond 580. I've had mine for a few months and have no issues with it.

 

I would think a piston filler would be a better choice cause as students, we write. A LOT. Using a piston filler will ensure that you don't have to refill the pen all the time (I refill my Pelikan M200 once a week in school!)

 

Perhaps look in the Classifieds to see if anyone is selling a TWSBI? Or a Pelikan?

 

 

 

~Epic

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Time to die.

 

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You like Lamy, stick with Lamy. The Linea, Logo, and the Pur are all metal. The Nexx is a super pen, metal barrel, plastic cap. And you might be able to find the Studio in brushed stainless steel in your range.

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The 580 is a great pen at a great price. As a student I actually prefer something made of plastic (or "resin" if you prefer) because I find that I can use a lighter weight pen for much longer without my hand cramping. While made of plastic, I feel like the 580 is a high quality pen that feels good in hand, and the lighter weight means I can write with it for longer periods of time.

"Oh deer."

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Hi,

 

Off the cuff I have two suggestions.

 

> Parker Sonnet. I've been using mine since my last years of school, through uni, and now as my daily writer in the office.

 

> Sheaffer Prelude. If you like the prescriptive shaped section of the Safari, this one might be for you.

 

Both are time-tested designs that remain in production. Both are c/c fillers, and the nib+section assembly can be purchased separately, which makes nib replacement more economical than purchasing an entire pen. And with the Sonnet, gold nibs are available. Both take their own proprietary cartridges / converters, but as you use bottled ink, that may not be a factor.

 

As I grasp most pens somewhat high on the section, I find that both the Sonnet and Prelude are fairly well balanced when posted. For those who grasp pens close to the nib, they might feel just a bit too back-weighted when posted.

 

I am lead to believe that the Sheaffer nibs are no longer made in USA, but I don't know if that makes so much of a difference, so that's something for you to look into.

 

Oh, while it doesn't have a 'snap cap' closure, a Sheaffer Targa just might squeeze into your cost constraint. (OooLaLa!)

 

Let us know how things progress.

 

Bye,

S1

 

__ Edit to add: 'Parker Sonnet vs Sheaffer Prelude' https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/121173-parker-sonnet-vs-sheaffer-prelude/?p=1199791

Edited by Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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Lamy CP1 or Rotring Espirit (discontinued but readily available as NOS from eBay). They are all metal, snap cap pens with impeccable German engineering.

 

They are fairly slim pens though, so make sure you are OK with that. I like my sections to be at least 11mm in diameter which these certainly aren't.

 

And of course the Lamy 2000. Doesn't get any more practical and function-over-form than that. It's right at your price limit though, (or actually above with that brutal %19 VAT :( )

 

-k

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Cross's pens are nice. You'll want a convertor as their range of cartridges is limited and expensive.

 

Alternatively the Faber Castell pens are nice. Good nibs, so the Loom & maybe the Ambition will probably work for you.

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I've only just discovered this brand but what about a Cleo Classic? If Chinese pen nibs have the same width as Japanese ones, and therefore the restriction on the latter can be lifted, there's probably many decent choices, my two Platinum "Cool" in M and FM work well and aren't very far off from my Lamy Vistas in F.

"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

 

B. Russell

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Well, the Al-Star has a metal construction, but it IS essentially the same pen as the Safari (with a few differences)

 

How about the Lamy Studio then? It is a metal pen that comes in a few different colours, which shares the same feed and nib as a Safari, so you can swap nibs around. More info on the pen here: http://www.gouletpens.com/LMY-L65/p/LMY-L65 (no affiliation)

 

Maybe a Pilot Metropolitan (or MR, as it's called in Europe)? The rule of thumb is that Japanese nibs runs a size thinner than their Western counterparts, so a Japanese F would be like a Western EF.

 

For TWSBI, perhaps consider the Diamond 580. I've had mine for a few months and have no issues with it.

 

I would think a piston filler would be a better choice cause as students, we write. A LOT. Using a piston filler will ensure that you don't have to refill the pen all the time (I refill my Pelikan M200 once a week in school!)

 

Perhaps look in the Classifieds to see if anyone is selling a TWSBI? Or a Pelikan?

 

 

 

~Epic

You like Lamy, stick with Lamy. The Linea, Logo, and the Pur are all metal. The Nexx is a super pen, metal barrel, plastic cap. And you might be able to find the Studio in brushed stainless steel in your range.

The 580 is a great pen at a great price. As a student I actually prefer something made of plastic (or "resin" if you prefer) because I find that I can use a lighter weight pen for much longer without my hand cramping. While made of plastic, I feel like the 580 is a high quality pen that feels good in hand, and the lighter weight means I can write with it for longer periods of time.

 

Thank you for your answers.

I agree for the piston-filler and plastic feel, I not forbid this material.

 

I just said that it would have changed if it was metal, but if I go for Lamy I would prefer the 2k... and I can't get it since the price with VAT is too much.

 

So the more interesting ones (twist-cap) are :

 

Twsbi 580

Pelikan m200

 

I will see how they perform vs the other options from sandy1 etc (faber-castell), Thanks !

Edited by Armand.D
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Lamy CP1 or Rotring Espirit (discontinued but readily available as NOS from eBay). They are all metal, snap cap pens with impeccable German engineering.

 

They are fairly slim pens though, so make sure you are OK with that. I like my sections to be at least 11mm in diameter which these certainly aren't.

 

And of course the Lamy 2000. Doesn't get any more practical and function-over-form than that. It's right at your price limit though, (or actually above with that brutal %19 VAT :( )

 

-k

The lamy 2k was the first pen I considered, but as you said.. Brutal VAT (150-200€) and Massdrop shipping is us-only..

 

No luck I guess (have to search through classifieds).

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Cross's pens are nice. You'll want a convertor as their range of cartridges is limited and expensive.

 

Alternatively the Faber Castell pens are nice. Good nibs, so the Loom & maybe the Ambition will probably work for you.

I will check for the fabers, I like the look of the Ambition.. Except the gap between the section and nib.

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in price range between 50-100 euros wih utilitarian look, my first choice would be lamy 2000, however I would also considering buying smaller lamy 82 which is a bit smaller and another pen :0

 

there's never enough of them ;p

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Watermans might be worth a look like a hemisphere. Lamy 2k would be my first choice maybe off the bay you can hit your price point

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Even though you want a metal body, what I suggest may not be metal but nice in all other aspects... An italix parsons.. Very good price, good choice of nibs and a very good service.. And made in UK so no vat..

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Even though you want a metal body, what I suggest may not be metal but nice in all other aspects... An italix parsons.. Very good price, good choice of nibs and a very good service.. And made in UK so no vat..

I accept also other materials for sure, just a better finish than a Safari :)

 

I lust looked to these, and indeed they seems to be amazingly crafted, the only thing that bothers me is the screw-cap.

 

For ~50€ in standard finish I could easily go for them if I give up the Sonnet option..

 

Thank you.

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Watermans might be worth a look like a hemisphere. Lamy 2k would be my first choice maybe off the bay you can hit your price point

Have to look for the hemisphere.

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One other option you might want to consider that has a great pedigree, slip on cap, gold nib, is very reliable, has an interesting back story and in your price range is the Aurora 98 Archivi Storici.

I don't think it is a pen I would pick at school, but I keep it in mind for the futur, this is a nice vintage pen.

 

Thank you !

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Hi,

 

Off the cuff I have two suggestions.

 

> Parker Sonnet. I've been using mine since my last years of school, through uni, and now as my daily writer in the office.

 

> Sheaffer Prelude. If you like the prescriptive shaped section of the Safari, this one might be for you.

 

Both are time-tested designs that remain in production. Both are c/c fillers, and the nib+section assembly can be purchased separately, which makes nib replacement more economical than purchasing an entire pen. And with the Sonnet, gold nibs are available. Both take their own proprietary cartridges / converters, but as you use bottled ink, that may not be a factor.

 

As I grasp most pens somewhat high on the section, I find that both the Sonnet and Prelude are fairly well balanced when posted. For those who grasp pens close to the nib, they might feel just a bit too back-weighted when posted.

 

I am lead to believe that the Sheaffer nibs are no longer made in USA, but I don't know if that makes so much of a difference, so that's something for you to look into.

 

Oh, while it doesn't have a 'snap cap' closure, a Sheaffer Targa just might squeeze into your cost constraint. (OooLaLa!)

 

Let us know how things progress.

 

Bye,

S1

 

__ Edit to add: 'Parker Sonnet vs Sheaffer Prelude' https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/121173-parker-sonnet-vs-sheaffer-prelude/?p=1199791

Well, first thank you for the detailed answer.

 

Between the two, as I am french it is much more easier to fo for the Parker, which is cheaper/available on ebay, for sometimes ~30€ that's a good deal imho.

 

But there are not a lot of them in fine,

From your experience with it, can you tell me if the is usually on the wetter side or not ?

 

+ it is not too expensive to take at school.

 

Otherwise I am wondering if there are great piston-filler existing with a 'snap cap', usually it is not the case ?

 

 

-> For now I am between the Sonnet option or the Italix Parsons, which attracts me a lot for its finish..

 

Thank you.

 

Armand.D

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Threaded Cap but the Levenger L-Tech 3.0 is a pretty cool metal pen. Especially the black one. Runs about 75USD.

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