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Fountain Pen In Ebonite Red Cumberland


PMcRoadPen48

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Ciao!

I've noticed that ebonite is getting some well deserved attention lately. In the spirit of this fanfare I'd like to offer pictures of a conservative style fountain pen I recently completed in red cumberland with black ebonite finials and section. I find it is a material that is a pleasure to work with like alumilite. I have recently acquired Japanese cumberland ebonite in other colors and am looking forward to producing more fountain pens in different styles with these colors. Enjoy.

 

Pat McConnel

somethinghwritepens.com

 

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Pat McConnel,

somethingwritepens.com

 

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Elegant shape, excellent balance of color distribution and proportion of the cap and barrel. I like it!

I can't believe I'm making fountain pens! pen.18111.com

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Elegant shape, excellent balance of color distribution and proportion of the cap and barrel. I like it!

 

Mille grazie! I appreciate your generous words.

Pat McConnel,

somethingwritepens.com

 

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That is a beautiful pen. Did you turn it on the lathe in your avatar?

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson

 

"I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

 

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

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That is a beautiful pen. Did you turn it on the lathe in your avatar?

Yes; the very large lathe in the foreground is the one I do almost all of my pen work on. Surprisingly, bigger is better for smaller; I also have more options in my tooling as well. The longer ways (40") mean that I can move the tailstock out of the way when I work close in. The tailstock also has a longer quill, which translates into the ability to drill deeper without moving the tailstock around.

 

Thanks for asking.

 

Regards,

Pat McConnel,

somethingwritepens.com

 

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Yes; the very large lathe in the foreground is the one I do almost all of my pen work on. Surprisingly, bigger is better for smaller; I also have more options in my tooling as well. The longer ways (40") mean that I can move the tailstock out of the way when I work close in. The tailstock also has a longer quill, which translates into the ability to drill deeper without moving the tailstock around.

 

Thanks for asking.

 

Regards,

 

I can't quite tell what kind of lathe it is. Please provide the make and model.

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson

 

"I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

 

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

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I can't quite tell what kind of lathe it is. Please provide the make and model.

The lathe is a Precision Matthews PM1340GT purchased from Quality Machine Tools in Pittsburg, PA., http://www.machinetoolonline.com/PM1340T.html Pricing, accessories, and shipping information are included at the link, as well as pictures.

 

It is a Taiwanese lathe and in high demand; I waited seven months for mine, but that was because I purchased it at the time the order for a large order of units was made. The manufacturer ships when he has a cargo container full of lathes, so you wait. Some people order when the lathes arrive, lucky people, so they experience only the wait of setup and checking out the lathes by Quality Machine Tools before customer shipment. QMT is a fine company to deal with and my experience with them has been excellent. It is a lathe with a reputation among serious lathe users for accuracy, dependability, amd longevity. At 1200 pounds my wife thought I had lost my mind when I ordered it; I couldn't resist the lure of quality and am glad I didn't.

 

I am always amazed at the agility of something so big in making something so small as una penna stilografica (fountain pen). For example, I have worked up a plan for a rollerball pen that uses stainless steel tubes for strength and rigidity to allow a smaller thinner pen. I will use this lathe to turn and drill the stainless steel #303 alloy to dimension that I purchased for this purpose.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Regards,

Pat McConnel,

somethingwritepens.com

 

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The lathe is a Precision Matthews PM1340GT purchased from Quality Machine Tools in Pittsburg, PA., http://www.machinetoolonline.com/PM1340T.html Pricing, accessories, and shipping information are included at the link, as well as pictures.

 

It is a Taiwanese lathe and in high demand; I waited seven months for mine, but that was because I purchased it at the time the order for a large order of units was made. The manufacturer ships when he has a cargo container full of lathes, so you wait. Some people order when the lathes arrive, lucky people, so they experience only the wait of setup and checking out the lathes by Quality Machine Tools before customer shipment. QMT is a fine company to deal with and my experience with them has been excellent. It is a lathe with a reputation among serious lathe users for accuracy, dependability, amd longevity. At 1200 pounds my wife thought I had lost my mind when I ordered it; I couldn't resist the lure of quality and am glad I didn't.

 

I am always amazed at the agility of something so big in making something so small as una penna stilografica (fountain pen). For example, I have worked up a plan for a rollerball pen that uses stainless steel tubes for strength and rigidity to allow a smaller thinner pen. I will use this lathe to turn and drill the stainless steel #303 alloy to dimension that I purchased for this purpose.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Regards,

 

Thank you very much. I have been thinking about getting an old South Bend lathe for many years. I have a Sherline mini lathe and a Vicmarc wood lathe. I agree with you, a big metal lathe is the way to go for serious pen turning.

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson

 

"I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

 

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

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