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Recommendations For A Wet Noodle, A Vintage, And A Modern(Uk)


Alexcat
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The title says it all really.....suggestions for a modern, and a vintage wet noodle, preferably in UK.

 

Thanks

Alex

"As many nights endure Without a moon or star So will we endure When one is gone and far "Leonard Cohen, of blessed memory(21/09/1934-7/11/2016)

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If you want a modern wet noodle you will have to have one specially made for you by one of the few nibmeisters who can do this. They are not offered in modern off-the-shelf pens. If you want a vintage one, the best place to look is is between 1900 and 1925 or so. These will generally be hard rubber pens. In either case, it is rare to find such a nib, in a restored, full-size pen, for under $200. They can easily go for $500.

 

If you have the money in hand, I suggest going to one of the specialist sellers of these pens and make sure it is a real wet noodle and not simply a "full flex" pen. The very best thing is to go to a pen show, or a brick and mortar store, so you can write before buying.

 

If you don't have that kind of money I suggest you investigate dip pens, where you can find such writing qualities far more cheaply and easily.

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Perhaps you'd like to specify what wet noodle means for you in terms of writing style (painterly?), fineness to width, ink supply, and rapidity of return of tines.

 

In terms of 'modern' you may wish to check this out: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/286757-i-did-a-totally-evil-thing-today/?p=3302210

Noodler's Konrad Acrylics (normal+Da Luz custom flex) ~ Lamy AL-Stars/Vista F/M/1.1 ~ Handmade Barry Roberts Dayacom M ~ Waterman 32 1/2, F semi-flex nib ~ Conklin crescent, EF super-flex ~ Aikin Lambert dip pen EEF super-flex ~ Aikin Lambert dip pen semi-flex M ~ Jinhao X450s ~ Pilot Custom Heritage 912 Posting Nib ~ Sailor 1911 Profit 21k Rhodium F. Favourite inks: Iroshizuku blends, Noodler's CMYK blends.

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Perhaps you'd like to specify what wet noodle means for you in terms of writing style (painterly?), fineness to width, ink supply, and rapidity of return of tines.

In terms of 'modern' you may wish to check this out: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/286757-i-did-a-totally-evil-thing-today/?p=3302210

Thank you for that link....exactly what In looking for! I'm fairly new to the FP world, though I've had an interest for a long time. I'm learning what I like and what I don't like, what works for me, and so on.

 

I confess to thinking that "wet noodle" = "very flexy"...... be gentle, Im still learning.....;)

 

Thanks again

Alex

"As many nights endure Without a moon or star So will we endure When one is gone and far "Leonard Cohen, of blessed memory(21/09/1934-7/11/2016)

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If you want a modern wet noodle you will have to have one specially made for you by one of the few nibmeisters who can do this. They are not offered in modern off-the-shelf pens. If you want a vintage one, the best place to look is is between 1900 and 1925 or so. These will generally be hard rubber pens. In either case, it is rare to find such a nib, in a restored, full-size pen, for under $200. They can easily go for $500.

 

If you have the money in hand, I suggest going to one of the specialist sellers of these pens and make sure it is a real wet noodle and not simply a "full flex" pen. The very best thing is to go to a pen show, or a brick and mortar store, so you can write before buying.

 

If you don't have that kind of money I suggest you investigate dip pens, where you can find such writing qualities far more cheaply and easily.

 

Many thanks....that was very helpful. I'm embarrassed to say I thought that wet noodle meant very flexy. Unfortunately Im not able to get to bricks and mortar shops, or shows, health reasons, so online is my only option.

I love the FPN....it's a fount(no pun intended) of knowledge....

Alex

"As many nights endure Without a moon or star So will we endure When one is gone and far "Leonard Cohen, of blessed memory(21/09/1934-7/11/2016)

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I confess to thinking that "wet noodle" = "very flexy"...... be gentle, Im still learning.....

I used to too ;). I couldn't guess at your knowledge or experience except from a hint in the title. I discovered that I actually prefer vintage super flex because it has snapback - it returns when I plan it to.

 

I also used to look at the Mottishaw modifications for Spencerian in particular, however decided that, for now, the risk of doing the nib in was too great. I don't have any issues with my vintage nibs though; after a good amount of regular use I don't worry about damaging them because I can 'feel' the maximum I am comfortable flexing each nib to (which is not the maximum a seller might promote).

 

Wet noodles need a *lot* of control - my dip nib is probably in that vicinity. It also has excellent snapback, but the control on the way through the stroke is softer, and less controllable, than my super flex. It is also able to flex a lot wider than my super flex pen.

 

I can't comment on Joseph's work as I haven't tried it in my hand yet. I am guessing from his videos here and elsewhere that it will be more on the painterly side than my super flex.

Noodler's Konrad Acrylics (normal+Da Luz custom flex) ~ Lamy AL-Stars/Vista F/M/1.1 ~ Handmade Barry Roberts Dayacom M ~ Waterman 32 1/2, F semi-flex nib ~ Conklin crescent, EF super-flex ~ Aikin Lambert dip pen EEF super-flex ~ Aikin Lambert dip pen semi-flex M ~ Jinhao X450s ~ Pilot Custom Heritage 912 Posting Nib ~ Sailor 1911 Profit 21k Rhodium F. Favourite inks: Iroshizuku blends, Noodler's CMYK blends.

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I used to too ;). I couldn't guess at your knowledge or experience except from a hint in the title. I discovered that I actually prefer vintage super flex because it has snapback - it returns when I plan it to.

I also used to look at the Mottishaw modifications for Spencerian in particular, however decided that, for now, the risk of doing the nib in was too great. I don't have any issues with my vintage nibs though; after a good amount of regular use I don't worry about damaging them because I can 'feel' the maximum I am comfortable flexing each nib to (which is not the maximum a seller might promote).

Wet noodles need a *lot* of control - my dip nib is probably in that vicinity. It also has excellent snapback, but the control on the way through the stroke is softer, and less controllable, than my super flex. It is also able to flex a lot wider than my super flex pen.

I can't comment on Joseph's work as I haven't tried it in my hand yet. I am guessing from his videos here and elsewhere that it will be more on the painterly side than my super flex.

I am - was going to say 'was', as I have not done so for sometime, due to long term caring for my husband, who beamed up to heaven( sorry, I can't abide 'passed away')a few months ago, but just because I've not done it doesn't change that I am still - an artist ......so, painterly sounds interesting and worth exploring.

 

Thanks for the help

Alex

"As many nights endure Without a moon or star So will we endure When one is gone and far "Leonard Cohen, of blessed memory(21/09/1934-7/11/2016)

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If you haven't used flex fountain pens before, don't start with a wet noodle.

The large majority of people who write with fountain pens do not seem to care for flexible nibs beyond what puts a bit of variation in their line. Many prefer stub or italic nibs to do that for them.

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An artist :) I look forward to seeing some of your work here when you make the acquisition you are seeking. Art moves my soul. I don't have the skill, but I do have a wide breadth of interest and appreciation for people's artistic creations across many mediums.

 

Have you've come across the Desiderata pens? They allow a modern day disposable steel dip nib to be inserted into a purpose-designed fountain pen body. (Made by a musician if I remember correctly; only released in the last year.) The Desiderata offers the best of two worlds - the flexibility of using changeable and exceptionally flexible steel dip nibs designed for calligraphic work (they do rust and need replacing but are cheap), paired with a continuous supply of ink. Nibs such as the Zebra-G can be used.

 

If you are interested, I understand it is now necessary to be on the Desiderata email list, as demand for the product currently exceeds Pierre's capacity to manufacture them by hand.

Noodler's Konrad Acrylics (normal+Da Luz custom flex) ~ Lamy AL-Stars/Vista F/M/1.1 ~ Handmade Barry Roberts Dayacom M ~ Waterman 32 1/2, F semi-flex nib ~ Conklin crescent, EF super-flex ~ Aikin Lambert dip pen EEF super-flex ~ Aikin Lambert dip pen semi-flex M ~ Jinhao X450s ~ Pilot Custom Heritage 912 Posting Nib ~ Sailor 1911 Profit 21k Rhodium F. Favourite inks: Iroshizuku blends, Noodler's CMYK blends.

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The other advantage with the Desiderata pen is that you can choose from among MANY dip pen nibs to use, and you can change it almost at any time. You are not stuck with one nib, as on a fountain pen. But Piere has sized the pen specifically for the G nib, which is a good nib. The G nib, is my standard nib that I use for my dip pen writing.

 

But for long lasting you want to use one of the chrome plated G nibs. The bare steel nibs need to be removed each time you put the pen away, as the bare steel nibs will rust much faster than the chrome plated nibs.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Would you call the Zebra G a wet noodle, though? To me, it's more of a superflex, in that it requires some additional effort, beyond normal writing pressure, to switch on the flex. Which is fine, especially for beginners. And I'm a big fan of the Desideratas.

 

A wet noodle, I think, is a nib that flexes under normal pressure, requiring a special lightness to write with it and not flex. I only have one vintage pen that I'd describe as a wet noodle in that sense - though I have a couple of others that were sold to me as such. :angry:

 

There are cheaply available dip nibs that are wet noodles, such as the Leonardt Principal EF, but I don't know which of them would work in a Desiderata. The Leonardt Principal looks too small for the feed, though I have managed to install one in an old eyedropper:

 

http://i.imgur.com/Z4CDuPz.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/utQ9Ep9.jpg

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@Goudy

I like the Hiro 41.

But I have to be careful, as it flexes too easily for me. So that might be your wet noodle.

However, I do not know if it will fit the Desiderata pen.

I use an oblique dip pen holder for most of my dip pen work. I use a straight holder for the larger nibs, that won't fit the oblique holder.

I just got a Desiderata, but have not inked it up yet. I'm trying to finish my tax returns...then I can play.

Edited by ac12

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Thanks, I'll try that one. I find the Leonardt Principal EF is also quite a challenge to control, with a strong tendency to snag on my upstrokes. It gets easier with practice, though.

 

It would be interesting to put together a list of dip nibs that do fit the Desiderata.

http://i.imgur.com/utQ9Ep9.jpg

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Thanks, I'll try that one. I find the Leonardt Principal EF is also quite a challenge to control, with a strong tendency to snag on my upstrokes. It gets easier with practice, though.

 

It would be interesting to put together a list of dip nibs that do fit the Desiderata.

 

Snagging on the upstroke, I look at 2 things

  • How much downward pressure are you putting on the pen. It should be VERY VERY little to none. I thought that I had a light hand before, but when I first tried a pointed nib, I found out that my light hand was not very light at all. It has taken quite a bit of practice, for me to be able to write freely with a pointed pen.
  • Is the paper SMOOTH. Any texture of the surface is a trap just waiting to snag a pointed nib.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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An artist :) I look forward to seeing some of your work here when you make the acquisition you are seeking. Art moves my soul. I don't have the skill, but I do have a wide breadth of interest and appreciation for people's artistic creations across many mediums.

Have you've come across the Desiderata pens? They allow a modern day disposable steel dip nib to be inserted into a purpose-designed fountain pen body. (Made by a musician if I remember correctly; only released in the last year.) The Desiderata offers the best of two worlds - the flexibility of using changeable and exceptionally flexible steel dip nibs designed for calligraphic work (they do rust and need replacing but are cheap), paired with a continuous supply of ink. Nibs such as the Zebra-G can be used.

If you are interested, I understand it is now necessary to be on the Desiderata email list, as demand for the product currently exceeds Pierre's capacity to manufacture them by hand.

That's very kind....my husband used to do the framing. Sometimes the frame is better than the painting ...... :) ......I loved industrial architecture: a lot of the things I painted are no longer there, which is a strange feeling. Also like architectural detail....windows, doors, arches, especially(can you tell Im a frustrated architect? Back in the 60s, when I was doing art at school, for the written part of the Exam, only the boys studied architecture. Girls did "History of the Painters". Hmph. Anyway, I did my own thing later.

Im on Pierre's mailing list....I did not know that a dip nib could be used in a fountain pen! D'oh.....

Thanks for the help, and the interest....much appreciated.

Alex

"As many nights endure Without a moon or star So will we endure When one is gone and far "Leonard Cohen, of blessed memory(21/09/1934-7/11/2016)

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I find the Hiro 41 to be far more flexible than the Zebra G nib, requiring virtually no pressure to get a good swell. The G requires significantly more effort in my opinion. I also find the Hiro 41 to far more forgiving to the beginner than either the Gillott 303 or the Leonardt Principal. Others may disagree, but that is what I think. :D

Edited by Cardboard_Tube
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