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Why Do Sailor Jentle Inks Smell Funny?


Lovely_Pen
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I have two bottles of Sailor Jentle Four Seasons and I was just wondering why these inks have such a strong smell. Anyone know? I absolutely love the inks, as they're super wet, saturated, and lubricated--but the smell is really funky. I can even smell the ink on the paper after its dried....

μὴ ζήτει τὰ γινόμενα γίνεσθαι ὡς θέλεις, ἀλλὰ θέλε τὰ γινόμενα ὡς γίνεται

καὶεὐροήσεις. - Epictetus

 

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I recently received the two from the new four season inks, but I can relate what you say, Jentle Blue-Black is growing on me, but its has a strong smell, still its dried, after it no problem, its the phenol to keep your inks safe for a while. Its weird you felt on the paper too. I can smell the nib, but not after something is written.

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That odor is a good thing since it indicates the presence of phenol. I love it about Sailor ink as it means mold will not be an issue. Too bad more companies can't or won't use it. A few years ago, EU regs eliminated its use by member countries. Consequently, I only purchase one bottle of a color rather than stock up as I did in the past. Some older inks have survived for decades, but I'm not certain the kinder, gentler, newer formulations will have a shelf life of comparable duration.

A certified Inkophile

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I think also the regular Pilot inks reeks of phenol too. I know the carts reeks of it even the paper will smell like that.

#Nope

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I've tried the Pilot Blue, Black and Blue-Black, and they definitely have the phenol smell. I tried the (disappointing) Pilot Red, and don't remember if it had the scent. When I find the box they're in, I can check.

 

I really should do a real ink review of the Pilot Red, as you don't see it around here much. There's a reason - it's mediocre.

--

Lou Erickson - Handwritten Blog Posts

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Thanks for the info guys! It's cool to know that my two bottles of Sailor ink are probably going to last for some time.

μὴ ζήτει τὰ γινόμενα γίνεσθαι ὡς θέλεις, ἀλλὰ θέλε τὰ γινόμενα ὡς γίνεται

καὶεὐροήσεις. - Epictetus

 

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/606/letterji9.png

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I love that smell. It reminds me of childhood, and the endless bottles of Skrip I went through.

"I was cut off from the world. There was no one to confuse or torment me, and I was forced to become original." - Franz Joseph Haydn 1732 - 1809
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  • 3 years later...

I know I am late to the party, but I just got my first sailor ink sample and noticed the smell.

All of you guys extolling the virtues of phenol do know its highly toxic to humans, right?

Knowing it's phenol, I will probably never buy another sailor ink.

BTW, my pilot inks (regular cartridges, petit cartridges and the ink in the V-pens) do not have that smell.

Maybe pilot discontinued its use. Hopefully sailor will do so soon, too. I prefer my ink non lethal.

Edited by sapient
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I know I am late to the party, but I just got my first sailor ink sample and noticed the smell.

All of you guys extolling the virtues of phenol do know its highly toxic to humans, right?

Knowing it's phenol, I will probably never buy another sailor ink.

BTW, my pilot inks (regular cartridges, petit cartridges and the ink in the V-pens) do not have that smell.

Maybe pilot discontinued its use. Hopefully sailor will do so soon, too. I prefer my ink non lethal.

 

 

Thank you! More for the rest of us. :D

 

Do you have a non-stick frying pan? Aluminium is a neurotoxin. Teflon is a carcinogen. Better stay away from large metropolitan areas§ too. Use a cell phone? Uh oh! Microwave radiation - wifi too. And so on..... Modern living!

 

I'll happily continue using Yama Dori. I love the smell of phenol in the morning. Smells like ..... INK!!

Edited by Karmachanic

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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Please, stop buying Sailor inks, save your health. I haven't been buying them at all (hence have got just 8 of them).

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The new increased pricing on Sailor inks are another excuse not to buy them :)

 

If one is going after only the colours of Sailor inks, they can be found in many other brands.

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The new increased pricing on Sailor inks are another excuse not to buy them :)

 

If one is going after only the colours of Sailor inks, they can be found in many other brands.

 

Thank you! Please list them for us.

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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Thank you! More for the rest of us. :D

 

Do you have a non-stick frying pan? Aluminium is a neurotoxin. Teflon is a carcinogen. Better stay away from large metropolitan areas§ too. Use a cell phone? Uh oh! Microwave radiation - wifi too. And so on..... Modern living!

 

I'll happily continue using Yama Dori. I love the smell of phenol in the morning. Smells like ..... INK!!

Carcinogens act cumulatively, so cell phones, exhaust fumes etc can indeed eventually cause cancer, if you live long enough. The modern way of life has greatly increased the incidence of cancer: a lot more people get cancer nowadays than just 50 years ago.

 

But this is beside the point. Phenol's carcinogenicity is debatable - its toxicity is not. I am not saying I am going to die in a week if I use sailor ink, but:

1: dying is not the only adverse health effect a toxin can have

2: I get ink on my fingers every day. Phenol penetrates skin easily. The chance of phenol affecting me in the long run is not totally out of the realm of possibility and I do not want to have to worry about it either.

 

+1. As was mentioned in this other thread; phenol is used in sprays for sore throats.

 

I love the smell of an ink preserved with phenol.

The fact that it is still used in some products does not mean it is safe. People have been using all kinds of hazardous stuff, even as medicine, until they realized the dangers. In fact, in most countries, products containing phenol have been banned in the last few years.

If you search a bit more here on fpn and elsewhere on the internet you can find more information about the hazards of phenol. Or you can just ignore me and go on using whatever inks you like. In the end, we each make our own choices, and live with the consequences.

 

Please, stop buying Sailor inks, save your health. I haven't been buying them at all (hence have got just 8 of them).

I would appreciate a little less insulting sarcasm for my choices, though.

Edited by sapient
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I would appreciate a little less insulting sarcasm for my choices, though.

 

I actually did not mean to insult you at all and I am sorry it sounded in such a way. I fully respect your opinion and choice. As for me I love Sailor inks for many reasons and secondly (call it prejudices) I do not believe such a Japanese company would make (and keep on making) anything harmful to a human's health (if used in a supposed way).

Edited by aurore
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This topic reminds me of that favorite trope of mystery novel writers, poisoned envelopes/stamps/pages that the victim unknowingly and repeatedly licks until lethal dose is delivered (I am thinking The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco here). Might our unfortunate fountain pen afficionado, in a vain attempt to prime his pen, licked the nib until he poisoned himself with the ink secretly placed in his study by our villain? This is a detective story just waiting to be written...

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They used phenol for a century in SOAP. There was not a cancer epidemic from it.

 

 

Agreed. The number of solvents, cleaners and detergents, preservatives in foods, treated fabrics, etc. that we come in contact every single day are much more likely to be a danger to us than Sailor inks. Perhaps someone with greater medical training could confirm or contradict me on this.

 

I am no chemist, but the amount of phenol necessary to inhibit mold growth in inks is actually miniscule. I have a bottle of a 2% phenol solution that I use for new inks that are unlikely to have any biocides (Private Reserve, for example). Of that 2% solution, I add 2-3 drops into a full bottle of ink (40-75 ml). As a result, the actual amount of phenol that you could come in contact with is quite, quite small, it seems to me.

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