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I don't put anything on the section/barrel joint in unless it is threaded. I would think you could use a pen immediately after slipping in the section.

 

But I'm likely not interpreting this correctly.

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how long does it take a section to set up once it has been inserted in the barrel?

 

Are you referring to a section that has been cemented into a barrel, or a section that has had a fresh sac cemented to the section nipple?

 

--Daniel

"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe

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When you reassemble the pen and insert the section back into the barrel, it's usually a good idea to add a dab or two of shellac to the portion of the section that goes into the barrel. On some pens, this fit is tight enough that you don't need shellac. On most pens, you'll notice a subtle wobble when writing if you don't lightly shellac the section. Just a thin dab at a few spots will do the job. The less you put on, the easier it will be to open the pen in the future, if necessary. If it's a lever filler, it's generally good form to line up the lever with the nib when you put the section back in.

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Thanks. I will wait overnight. It is my first fountain pen repair job.

 

Give the sac a couple good tugs the next morning.

 

If it stays on, you're good to go.

 

I would NEVER wet shellac a section into a barrel. I'd build the section UP with Dried shellac though.

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

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If it's a lever filler, it's generally good form to line up the lever with the nib when you put the section back in.

 

I read of a couple guys in the UK who do it the opposite. The nib is 180 degrees offset from the nib. Then if it is slightly off, it is more difficult to tell.

 

The one that messes you up is the Esterbrook. Because change nibs and the new nib will likely not line up like the old nib.

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I would NEVER wet shellac a section into a barrel. I'd build the section UP with Dried shellac though.

 

I had thought to shellac the section lightly into the barrel because manufacturers did this. Is this not the case?

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I had thought to shellac the section lightly into the barrel because manufacturers did this. Is this not the case?

 

I am not a expert but I'm not aware of any major maker (actually Any maker) that shellaced sections in. They were friction fit or a few that were threaded.

 

There are some that used a rosin section sealant but that isn't in most latex sac/lever fill pens. Section sealant is also Much Less the "adhesive" than shellac.

 

Yes, I have heard that Brit lever fill pens are routinely set up with the lever opposite the nib.

 

The reason I've always heard for the match the nib to lever idea is that When some levers get flopitis, there is less chance that it will hang down, catch on something and inadvertently empty the ink out.

 

Yes, on an Estie, the alignment is likely to change when you switch nibs.

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

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I believe that Sheaffer used to shellac the sections to the barrels. I have one of the old repair manuals, and it mentions breaking a shellac seal between the barrel and section to remove it.

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Pressing a section back into a barrel is always pretty easy. I mean the resistance there is quite small. I reason from that the section is not "secure." That is, I could pull it out easily if I wanted to. And if I can, probably a customer or a customer's child could. I want to make the section secure in the barrel, so I always shellac a press-in section and use resin on a screw-in. I don't feel obliged to make the pen's inner parts accessible to everyone.

 

Also, as someone else said, I can feel a section that's even just a tad loose when I write and I don't like it.

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I believe that Sheaffer used to shellac the sections to the barrels. I have one of the old repair manuals, and it mentions breaking a shellac seal between the barrel and section to remove it.

 

Yes, you will find this referred to in repair manuals from virtually all the major manufacturers of the era.

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Pressing a section back into a barrel is always pretty easy. I mean the resistance there is quite small. I reason from that the section is not "secure." That is, I could pull it out easily if I wanted to. And if I can, probably a customer or a customer's child could. I want to make the section secure in the barrel, so I always shellac a press-in section and use resin on a screw-in. I don't feel obliged to make the pen's inner parts accessible to everyone.

 

Also, as someone else said, I can feel a section that's even just a tad loose when I write and I don't like it.

 

I suspect we've been working on different types of pens; I only occasionally find a pen whose friction-fit section is so loose that it's not secure. I don't think I've ever cemented in a section to address looseness; I prefer to simply make the fit tighter.

 

If a customer would like to remove the section of his/her pen, I don't feel obligated to try to make the inner parts inaccessible to him/her.

 

--Daniel

"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe

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I suspect we've been working on different types of pens; I only occasionally find a pen whose friction-fit section is so loose that it's not secure. I don't think I've ever cemented in a section to address looseness; I prefer to simply make the fit tighter.

 

If a customer would like to remove the section of his/her pen, I don't feel obligated to try to make the inner parts inaccessible to him/her.

 

--Daniel

 

Probably not so much different types of pens as different procedures. I give the section (but not the barrel) about 10 minutes in a sonic cleaner with Rapidoeze and that removes about all the residue of shellac from the section tenon and nipple. Of course we're talking in relative terms Daniel, but I find sections fit easily into the barrels and will turn as well as pull out without much effort.

 

My experience I'm sure is hugely different from yours in number and variety of pens. I've worked mainly on Sheaffer Balance pens (probably 100 in the last 3 months), but the few Wahl Eversharps and Conway Stewarts I've done seem the same.

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Probably not so much different types of pens as different procedures. I give the section (but not the barrel) about 10 minutes in a sonic cleaner with Rapidoeze and that removes about all the residue of shellac from the section tenon and nipple. Of course we're talking in relative terms Daniel, but I find sections fit easily into the barrels and will turn as well as pull out without much effort.

 

My experience I'm sure is hugely different from yours in number and variety of pens. I've worked mainly on Sheaffer Balance pens (probably 100 in the last 3 months), but the few Wahl Eversharps and Conway Stewarts I've done seem the same.

 

I too work on a lot of Balances, but I generally knock out the nib/feed and I usually do not ultrasonically clean the section, just the feed (I clean the bore of the section using other means, and I clean the nipple mechanically and sometimes chemically, but not ultrasonically). So the generally tight fit of the section is maintained.

 

--Daniel

"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe

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It seems there are a wide range of opinions on this thread.

 

My take on the conversation:

 

1. Never shellac or glue threaded sections. Use resin sealant instead, which won't harden and will allow for easy disassembly of the pen in the future.

 

2. Whether to lightly shellac a press-fit section seems to be a matter of personal preference, although manufacturer manuals generally recommended the practice.

 

For lightly shellacking a friction-fit section:

 

Pros:

1. some pens will feel more sturdy because the section/barrel joint is secured

2. clients/users won't as easily be able to open the pen and perhaps tamper with the filling mechanism

 

Cons:

1. disassembling the pen in the future will require heat and skill, perhaps leading to breakage

2. some clients/users may want to be able to inspect the filling mechanism

 

It seems from this thread that it may be more historically accurate to lightly shellac the friction-fit section, but doing so may not be necessary to enjoy a fully functioning restored pen.

 

For pens in my personal collection, I only shellac the section if the pen otherwise wobbles when I write or the barrel can turn against the section easily. But then, I want the ability to open up my personal pens whenever I'd like to tinker with them or show their mechanisms to curious guests. For pens I've restored for clients, I've always *lightly* shellacked the section to ensure that the pen will behave for my client as it does for me when it leaves my control. For threaded sections on pens whose barrels actually contain the ink and which require an air-tight section seal to function properly, I use a resin sealant (e.g., Vacs, Vac-Fils). I have not used sealant on threaded sections whose air-tightness is not a concern (e.g., original Duofolds) because they use inner sacs shellacked to the nipple.

 

Let me stress that I lightly shellac the section -- usually just two thin dabs on opposite sides of the section. The intent is to have just enough shellac present to keep the section from moving within the barrel, but to have so little shellac that it will be easy to open the pen with a little heat in the future.

Edited by rtrinkner
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2. Whether to lightly shellac a press-fit section seems to be a matter of personal preference, although manufacturer manuals generally recommended the practice.

 

 

 

Whoa Nellie.

 

"Manufacturer manuals generally recommended it"?

 

I will admit to Not having repaired any Wide range of different maker friction fit pens. OTOH, I DO pay attention in

class here on FPN.

 

But I was Not aware, have NEVER read anywhere on FPN, where Most All pens Came from the factory with sections shellaced in. I sure know Esterbrooks weren't and in volume, they were one of The Biggest makers.

 

If the Majority of the big 4 pens sections were shellaced in, I'd sure like to hear one of the Pros tell me so 'cause I sure haven't heard this before.

 

I would actually like to See Exactly what "these manuals" say use the shellac for. Is it increasing a loose sections diameter as we should do or Glueing a section in, which let me be clear, I don't think the factories did themselves.

 

It's a Friction Fit. By definition that Doesn't require shellac.

 

Again, we were discussing lever fillers. There is no need for the section to barrel be Sealed.

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

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Whoa Nellie.

 

"Manufacturer manuals generally recommended it"?

 

I will admit to Not having repaired any Wide range of different maker friction fit pens. OTOH, I DO pay attention in

class here on FPN.

 

But I was Not aware, have NEVER read anywhere on FPN, where Most All pens Came from the factory with sections shellaced in. I sure know Esterbrooks weren't and in volume, they were one of The Biggest makers.

 

If the Majority of the big 4 pens sections were shellaced in, I'd sure like to hear one of the Pros tell me so 'cause I sure haven't heard this before.

 

I would actually like to See Exactly what "these manuals" say use the shellac for. Is it increasing a loose sections diameter as we should do or Glueing a section in, which let me be clear, I don't think the factories did themselves.

 

It's a Friction Fit. By definition that Doesn't require shellac.

 

Again, we were discussing lever fillers. There is no need for the section to barrel be Sealed.

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

 

I think rtrinkner was summarizing other posts instead of making an assertion. See Post #14 in reply to #12.

Edited by dneal
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