Jump to content

Printing, Cursive, Cursive Italic Or Fancy Schmancy



See Pic Below  

154 members have voted

  1. 1. Easiest on the eyes?

  2. 2. Easiest to read?



Recommended Posts

It would be interesting to see the results broken down by demographics (such as age or culture). For instance, I learned to write in cursive in the mid-1960s. So I found that one (D) easiest on the eyes. But found the cursive italic (B) to be easiest to read. If they had been ranked, I would have had to call the "fancy schmantzy" hand (A) hardest to read, and also hardest on my eyes. But would my grandmother have had the same trouble with (A)? I wonder.

I *also* wonder if I skew the poll, having originally majored in Graphic Design -- so I have taken classes in typography and calligraphy (although not having ever learned Copperplate).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

Perhaps someone smarter than me could set up a poll breaking down the demographics. That would be interesting indeed.

The examples I presented are my handwriting styles, with the "fancy-schmancy" as my crude attempt at Spencerian - with a personal flair - that I've incorporated in to my handwriting rotation.

Copperplate/roundhand to me, is calligraphy. I don't do calligraphy, and I don't consider calligraphy practical for "everyday handwriting".

Again, the purpose of this poll was not to show-off my handwriting, but to make a point...which will be revealed at a later time.

Frankly, I'm surprised only 51 members, as of this post, out of the 90,000+, have bothered to vote.

 

Edit: I stand corrected...53.

Edited by GClef
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 75
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • GClef

    36

  • Cepasaccus

    8

  • tinkerteacher

    7

  • domnortheast

    5

Whilst I find C (print) to be the clearest, it's also the one that takes me the longest to read.

Edited by Andrew-
Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst I find C (print) to be the clearest, it's also the one that takes me the longest to read.

 

Very interesting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

:: nudge::

I think the nudge was for me :lol: . Of course I chose that one! Cursive is better than everything else. Period.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the nudge was for me :lol: . Of course I chose that one! Cursive is better than everything else. Period.

Actually, the "nudge" is to move the thread to the top of the topic....but why THAT cursive?

You just HAD to be the odd-ball, didn't cha?

Link to post
Share on other sites

If easiest on the eyes means the nicest looking, that it is A. The uneven line width is not so good, but it somehow wins over D. I believe it is the more clear letter separation.

Easiest to read is C, because I most often read printing and the cursive is none I see over here in Germany.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If I consider not just your examples, but other people's "fancy schmancy", it wins easily for easy on the eyes, but rarely would it win for readability. Yours is pretty readable.

 

I voted for print as the most readable, and I think that is in general true, but I receive correspondence with difficult to read printing from some people. However, probably their cursive is even worse, if they can write cursive. Also, limiting it to your examples, the cursive italic is very close to as readable as the print; say 90% or more.

 

Some people I know or correspond with (including, but not limited to, my father) print in all caps. This is less easy on the eyes than any of your choices, and not as easy to read as either b or c.

 

I don't think I've ever received correspondence written in a cursive italic.

Edited by mrcharlie
Link to post
Share on other sites

If I consider not just your examples, but other people's "fancy schmancy", it wins easily for easy on the eyes, but rarely would it win for readability. Yours is pretty readable.

 

I voted for print as the most readable, and I think that is in general true, but I receive correspondence with difficult to read printing from some people. However, probably their cursive is even worse, if they can write cursive. Also, limiting it to your examples, the cursive italic is very close to as readable as the print; say 90% or more.

 

Some people I know or correspond with (including, but not limited to, my father) print in all caps. This is less easy on the eyes than any of your choices, and not as easy to read as either b or c.

 

I don't think I've ever received correspondence written in a cursive italic.

This is good. I like feedback like this.

Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If easiest on the eyes means the nicest looking, that it is A. The uneven line width is not so good, but it somehow wins over D. I believe it is the more clear letter separation.

Easiest to read is C, because I most often read printing and the cursive is none I see over here in Germany.

Is "D" more of an American "thing" you think?

I would like to see the cursive that you use in Germany.

Link to post
Share on other sites

German cursive is shown here: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ausgangsschrift#Ausgangsschriften_seit_1953

And the older here: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsche_Kurrentschrift

 

I learned the "Lateinische Ausgangsschrift" from 1953 which is based on the "Deutsche Normalschrift" from 1941. For me already the first word has a strange I and a strange s in your cursive. The I in your first sample is more fancy, but looks more familiar to me than that in the last sample.

 

The newer cursive is simplified and more similar to printing, esp. the upper case letters, or it is not anymore cursive but printing - the "Hamburger Druckschrift".

 

The older cursive, the "Deutsche Kurrent", is really only seen in very old letters and notes. With line width variation it can be very beautiful, but in practice if find it difficult to read, because of the similarity of many of the lower case letters. Words like "Klemmennummern umnummerieren" look like an even saw blade unless carefully written.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Printing easiest to read, but fancy cursive makes me think that it is worth reading.

Please call me Nathan. It is a pleasure to meet you.

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/606/letterji9.pnghttp://img244.imageshack.us/img244/5642/postcardde9.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

The first sample is more carefull writing without painting it and the second more fast writing without losing to much readability.

 

Cepasaccus.

post-91927-0-55118000-1426103695_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

post-57071-0-88550500-1426107549.jpg

 

GClef you have been a major contributor and source of inspiration to many here, and I'm glad to participate in your thread.

 

This is just my opinion but my print/cursive italic seems easier to read/ easier on the eyes and has more pizazz in comparison with my monoline business cursive, which remains a work in progress.

 

Cepasaccus: I like your cursive, it has some nice personality to it! My cursive seems pretty blasé in comparison but I will keep practicing at it.

 

Great thread!

:thumbup:

Edited by cellmatrix
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid, one of my father's sisters lived with us, after my mom passed away.

She took care of me and my younger brother and my father...you know, doing the cooking and all, food shopping and other stuff.

When she would come home from buying groceries, there would always be a bag of Three Musketeers candy in one of the bags, and my brother and I would eat them.

In a conversation with my aunt about "them good ole days", I tell her that I can't even stand to look at a Three Musketeers candy bar, because I had it so much as a kid. She says, "Well, I got them, because you always ate them."

So, I say, "Yeah, we ate them, because that's what you always got us!"

 

How funny is that?!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now, can someone tell me what a story about Three Musketeers candy has to do with this thread?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about your mom GClef, its a tough thing to go thru especially when you were just a kid and it sounds like your aunt sacrificed a lot to help and your brother at a critical time. Your story seems to show how miscommunication can sabotage good intentions. Is that what is happening with this thread?

Edited by cellmatrix
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about your mom GClef, its a tough thing to go thru especially when you were just a kid and it sounds like your aunt sacrificed a lot to help and your brother at a critical time. Your story seems to show how miscommunication can sabotage good intentions. Is that what is happening with this thread?

 

Thank you for that, my aunt was the best "2nd mom" anyone could ask for.

As for your explanation between my Three Musketeers anecdote and this thread....not quite there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37512
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      30264
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25570
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • A Smug Dill
      Even so, you'd end up with a fragmented list, and it becomes an O(N²) process for each prospective requestor to check what is available: effectively recreate the list of currently active servers (without any reliable up-to-date info upfront about the inks and number of samples on offer in the thread) from the sequential list of posts, which may be spread over two or even more pages, and then query each server independently to check what is currently on offer.   It comes down to not hav
    • LizEF
      If one wanted to do this, one could just use the "About Me" field which appears to be unlimited in size.  And if a bunch of people wanted to cooperate, the Member Title field (or signature) could be used to this end - "Ink Giver" (or some such) could be used by those with inks to give...  No software edits required.
    • Arkanabar
      I suppose the update issue could be mitigated.  One would post a link in signature, to the particular part of your profile where you list the inks that you're willing to post samples to others, gratis.  But looking at profiles, I suspect that would require an edit to the board's software, potentially a nontrivial task.
    • A Smug Dill
      I read your idea as getting willing givers to publicly register as members of a set of heterogenous servers, in a system in which a client would explicitly select an available server from a list, to which he/she will then send a request privately and asynchronously. Request handling in the system is unmanaged, and individual requests are handled by the targeted servers completely independently on each other. I think the model is fine, although there are some operational concerns you may want to
    • Daneaxe
      First thought on the method/system of ink sharing: Think the best way, to begin with, is to follow the way of the US thread: offer up a (small) list of inks you are willing to PIF, to whoever expresses interest. Write clearly in the "mission statement" how it works, with a tiny "quid pro quo" that even a struggling student can comply with, i.e. post your opinion and a writing sample, with option of a full review if desired.   So yours truly might say: "I'm offering up samples of D
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Expiring Soon

    • By benbot517
      51 years and 5 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 5 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 5 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 5 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 5 months
  • Random Adverts

  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 1946
      1946
      (75 years old)
    2. ahaanne
      ahaanne
      (61 years old)
    3. amikosa
      amikosa
      (41 years old)
    4. angeltreats
      angeltreats
      (41 years old)
    5. badgerbadger
      badgerbadger
      (42 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...