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How Are B (++) Nibs Made?


proton007
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I can see two ways of doing it:

 

  • Make nibs the same width (M), but 'trim' the tines at the tip for making the B+ nibs. Doing so reduces the length of the nib slightly, but only one nib type has to be made.
  • Make nibs the same length, but make different widths at the tip. Costlier to manufacture as each individual nib width has to be made in batches.

 

Maybe I'm wrong, but sometimes I get the feeling some companies seem to follow the first method. Especially if you have a lot of EF/F nibs and need some B/BB nibs urgently...

Edited by proton007

In a world where there are no eyes the sun would not be light, and in a world where there were no soft skins rocks would not be hard, nor in a world where there were no muscles would they be heavy. Existence is relationship and you're smack in the middle of it.

- Alan Watts

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I'd go with the second choice, but the first works out quite well too. I've done this to many of my vintage pens that have XXF points and are sharper than heck. You are essentially trimming the tip off of the triangle. I don't think you'll get much wider than a wide <M> if you're starting with a f-xf.

@arts_nibs

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I would think they have different stamping tools, cutting narrow, medium and broad and BB tipped nibs, in each needs it's own form, to take the bead of 'iridium'.

Be too much hand work to start trying to grind or clip a nib 'down' to size.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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The nib is typically stamped from sheet gold or steel, formed and then a small ball of a hard alloy (osmium, ruthenium, tungsten) is then resistance welded to the tip. The balls range in size from 0.6mm to 2mm, sometimes even larger. The tip is then ground into the desired shape.

 

Here's a good video of the process (interesting part starts at 1:09):

 

Edited by jgrasty
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The nib is typically stamped from sheet gold or steel, formed and then a small ball of a hard alloy (osmium, ruthenium, tungsten) is then resistance welded to the tip. The balls range in size from 0.6mm to 2mm, sometimes even larger. The tip is then ground into the desired shape.

 

Here's a good video of the process (interesting part starts at 1:09):

 

 

That Video was Awesome! Thanks abunch

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That makes sense.

 

Obviously after purchase modifications would have to follow the second process.

In a world where there are no eyes the sun would not be light, and in a world where there were no soft skins rocks would not be hard, nor in a world where there were no muscles would they be heavy. Existence is relationship and you're smack in the middle of it.

- Alan Watts

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