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Usa Today Article About The New Esterbrook Pens



Tasmith

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Sadly, that very huge step down....ruins it.

All bling, no use.

Pretty pens though.

 

What can one expect from a ball point barbarian.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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inkstainedruth

Wonder what USA Today would think of the discussions that have been going on about the pens (and Mr. Rosenberg) on another thread....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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Two hundred million fountain pens per year. Boy, they were busy ! :lticaptd:

I would guess that Bryan Williams ran that ad, just before his helicopter was shot down.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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So if Mr. Rosenberg is as successful with Esterbrook as he was with Conklin, I might give his pens a try. Have a modern Conklin, the nib is great. And the c/c mechanism -- well, that always works out well for me. Reminds me of the Bexley pens I have, in many ways. Didn't like the modern Conklin Crescent, though. Mechanism was flimsy and didn't work well for me. Still have the nib, mounted in a Konrad. Love those # 6 italics.

 

Never liked the vintage Esterbrooks. Just didn't work out for me -- tried two, supposedly restored. Couldn't get nib units that I liked, the pen bodies leaked. But, a modern interpretation? Would be willing to try one out.

 

Enjoy,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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Can't see an Estie leaking unless you got a cracked section, twice.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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thatotherguy1

Sadly, that very huge step down....ruins it.

All bling, no use.

Pretty pens though.

 

What can one expect from a ball point barbarian.

That's pretty much how I felt too. I was hoping that Esterbrook would do something along the lines of the new Conklin (same reviver as Esterbrook might I add), meaning make replicas of their old flagship pens as well as modern pens that seem like they would have been made by the original company. In other words, just as Conklin revived the crescent filler, I was hoping that the new Esterbrook would remake its lever fill pens of the mid 20th century. The Dollar Pen, J, double jewel, etc. It would have been even better if they either used cellulose acetate celluloid (or acrylic) that mimicked the beautiful celluloids of the original Esterbrooks (nobody makes that gorgeous mottled luminescent green the same way to my knowledge) without as much of the fire hazard of the old cellulose nitrate. That's not to say that the new acrylics aren't pretty, I just think that a modern rendition of the lost celluloids would be great.

The design doesn't do anything for me. That step down kills any attraction I had to the pens to be honest. I would rather have a light pen with a non flush cap that I can comfortably write with for hours than a flush cigar shaped pen that looks good capped but isn't comfortable for long sessions.

All IMHO and YMMV, as always.

Here to help when I know, learn when I don't, and pass on the information to anyone I can :)

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This reads more like a press release than an article to me. Don't let that 200 million figure fool you. It refers to dip pen nibs which were called "pens" back in the day. Those dip pen nibs are what originally put Esterbrook on the radar. Fountain pens were added later.

 

Regardless, it is always good to see an article about fountain pens in a major publication, even if it is USA Today - LOL.

 

Sam

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