Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Lamy 2000 Vs. Pilot Falcon For Note-Taking


durango177
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm a high school student who has just recently gotten in to fountain pens. I first got a Safari F, which was nice, but I then upgraded to a TWSBI 580 in F, which is so much better. I really prefer the thinner line that I get from the TWSBI. I've been using Kon-peki after getting a bottle of it, it's absolutely wonderful.

 

Anyway, on to my question. I've heard really good things about the 2000 and the Falcon, and I'm looking for a pen in that price range. From other questions like this the 2k seems to be more recommended, but when I checked on the Goulet's site, even the EF 2k nib is larger than the TWSBI's F, which is a bit concerning for me. I think the semi-flex of the Falcon is really neat and I also think that it looks really really nice. So which would you recommend more highly to me? I'm also absolutely open to any other suggestions for pens for my purpose. (I have heard about the VP, but I'm not that keen on the retractable nib, I don't like the aesthetic as much).

 

EDIT: I will also be using this pen for some light journaling and handwriting practice, if that makes any difference.

Edited by durango177
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 27
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • ylw

    2

  • CAG_1787

    2

  • ac12

    2

  • Algester

    2

Top Posters In This Topic

I dont own a falcon, and am not a fan of flex nibs, so I cannot compare. I do own a Lamy 2k and it is excellent - very practical and a wonderful writer.

 

If you want to practice your penmanship and understand what a flex nib can do for you then I can see a falcon maybe a serious contender.

 

If you want a consistent ef line in a pen that can do everything (and the Lamy 2k ef is to thick) then I would suggest a look at Sailor or Pilot pens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've owned 2 Pilot Customs, both with the Falcon nib, and just couldn't like them enough to keep them.

The flexibility of the FA nibs was fun, but the ink flow DROVE ME FREAKIN' CRAZY!

AARGH!! I STILL GET peeved OFF JUST THINKING ABOUT IT!

 

Oh, and BTW, I don't have a Lamy 2k, but I have a Studio. The EF nib is like a medium fine.

I have an issue with the smooth metal section too. I had to flush and put that sucker away, because that too was starting to annoy me.

I'll probably end up gifting it or something.

 

Good day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one Falcon, two Lamy 2000s, and three Vanishing Points + extra nibs.

 

Try as I may, I don't enjoy writing with the Falcon. My Lamys and VPs are in my pen rotation frequently.

 

Too bad you don't like the aesthetics of the VP. Perhaps you can go to a nearby brick and mortar pen shop near you and handle one for a while, see how it writes. You might just change your mind.

Edited by doggonecarl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Falcon might be too small.

 

FWIW, my Lamy 2000 F is about as big as my Pilot 92 FM.

Edited by flipper_gv
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have both. I'd get the 2000. Pop top, lower key for a school environment, great in the hand, durable.

 

Here's some nib size comparisons.

 

Glenn

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/280017-lamy-2000-extra-fine-versus-lamy-2000-broad/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't have either, BUT for notes at school stick with what you have. You really want to see a $150+ pen get danaged, lost or stolen at school?

 

If you want to get one go for it. I just wouldn't take it to school.

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Lamy 2000, without a doubt. Consistent flow at all times and conditions. The Falcon can be quirky at times. I dont find it to be a pen to grab for spontaneous/long-term writing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have both, would go with the 2000. Not too flashy as to cause notice, solid performer, perfect school pen. The Falcon is one of my favorite pens, but I find that bouncy nibs aren't great for note-taking in my experience. I have my 2000 in extra-fine inked with Kon Peki at the moment and it's a great pair.

 

Edit: Forgot to mention that the 2000's ink capacity is significantly greater than the Falcon fitted with a CON-50. You don't want to have to worry about running out of ink at school.

Edited by av8r172
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have both and highly recommend them both, but for different reasons. I actually carry both of them at almost all times. For the last few months, the rest of the collection have been relegated to the desk.

 

To your question, for quick writing, go with the 2000. I love that pen.

  • unquestioningly reliable
  • fantastic Bauhaus design (why not own a legend?)
  • subtle enough to not demand attention
  • holds plenty of ink
  • secure snap cap for quick deployment
  • hooded nib is perfect for extended exposure during note taking
  • durable finish under almost any circumstance

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the Falcon, too, but for reasons that aren't helpful for strict note-taking. The semi-flexible nib makes it a uniquely enjoyable writing experience, but also not ideal for small, quick writing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't have either, BUT for notes at school stick with what you have. You really want to see a $150+ pen get danaged, lost or stolen at school?

 

If you want to get one go for it. I just wouldn't take it to school.

 

I took my Lamy 2000 to school and it was fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't have either, BUT for notes at school stick with what you have. You really want to see a $150+ pen get danaged, lost or stolen at school?

 

If you want to get one go for it. I just wouldn't take it to school.

 

+1

 

Biggest reason: if you are happy with what you have, do not spend money on something else. Wait until you need it.

 

In general, I like the Lamy 2000, but I like a generous medium nib. My favorite work-a-day note-taking pen is the Parker 51, especially an "English" medium or a wet US medium. (Parker 51's from Newhaven, UK, were marked "Made in England" until I-don't-know-when).

 

Also, in general, Japanese pens run a shade narrower than European / American pens. A Sailor 1911M or ProGear will have a stiff nib; the medium is about halfway between a European fine and a medium...and the Japanese "fine" is finer. The Falcon and the Vanishing Point have wider nibs than typical Japanese pens, though.

 

As mentioned above, if you can get to a physical pen store, try out the pens. Above $50 or so, the pen will cost enough that you won't want to buy something just because others -- us, well-meaning though we are -- say we like it.

 

Aha...almost forgot the classic answer: Buy one pen and three nibs...it's like buying three different pens!

 

Esterbrook made pens that accept all of their "renew-points": just unscrew the old nib and screw in the new one. A restored Esterbrook will cost about the same as a Safari or a TWSBI. Check Brian and Lisa Anderson's website for Estie nibs. (The great company closed in the late 1960s, but the pens seem likely to last a long long time)

 

Levenger's True-writer is like a modern Esterbrook, although Levenger seems to have no market for anything other than fine / medium / broad nibs. There is no law, of course, against having a nib specialist make a medium into an exra-fine nib.

 

Pelikan nibs are almost as interchangeable as Levenger, with slightly more off-the-shelf variety. The "low-priced" Pelikan 200 is a little more expensive than an Estie or a new True-writer, but their steel nibs are about $25. (Unnecessary warning: if you swap a Pelikan nib from a larger Pel into a smaller "bird", you risk having the cap bind against the nib. You can go up, but not down: a Pelikan 200 / 400 nib will fit a $350 Pelikan 600, but don't put a Pel 600 nib into a Pelikan 400 or 200 pen-body)

Washington Nationals 2019: the fight for .500; "stay in the fight"; WON the fight

Link to comment
Share on other sites

to me I'd go with a Kakuno its been rumored to take in CON-70 in the barrel just fine... cheaper but harder to get in the states but there's that option, unless your fine with your money and what happens to it I'd go with the lamy 2000

or if you want more options from Pilot look beyond the Elabo there's the Heritage 91 and Custom 74 which would be more or less equate to 90 USD to the US depending on the exchange rate

Edited by Algester
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2000. I used one back in high school, and it survived just fine through cold winters and abuse. It's still a smooth and responsive writer even now, despite not seeing much use as before.

Calculating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Ute,

If you cannot afford to easily replace the pen, without significant financial impact, I would use neither pen at school.

In my experience, school is a high risk environment for damage, loss and/or theft.

If you get either pen, keep it at home, where it will be safe, and just use it for homework and journaling.

Use your current pen, or a similar relatively inexpensive pen at school.

 

And just because someone made it through school without damaging or loosing their pen at school, does not mean you will.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And just because someone made it through school without damaging or loosing their pen at school, does not mean you will.

 

 

What you are saying here is nothing more than "just because someone shares his experience doesn't mean you will experience the exact same thing" Next time do try to think about what you post before you actually post it because what you are saying here applies to both negative AND positive experiences. This is not advice (since it is absolutely useless due to it being applicable to every interpretation), it is nothing more than sharing ones own experiences. Just leave it to the reader to draw his/her own conclusion, don't force it on them. Remember that we have very little information about OP's personality and school.

 

The only good advice I'm seeing here are from people who discuss the specifics of the pens itself.

Edited by ylw
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ylw

That is YOUR interpretation.

 

Mine is that a student has both odds the he will make it through school without incident, or he could have an incident.

It is a roll of the dice as to what happens.

Note the items that I said 1)damage and 2)loose, I did not say 3)theft but it should be in the list as well or it could be part of #2.

Of the 3 items, #1 and #2 are largely based on the user and it does not matter where he is.

#1 could be as simple as the pen rolling off the desk and landing on the nib

#2 could be as simple as walking out of classroom/library and forgetting the pen behind. Or it slipping out of the pocket and getting left behind. Leaving an item behind is unfortunately a somewhat common situation, look at all the "lost and found" things that people leave behind. I have done this myself a few times.

 

#3 is an outside party (the thief). This is where you have outside people creating the incident.

 

You are addressing the question that was asked, and nothing else.

I answered the question that was not asked but should be considered. So rather than A or B, my answer was neither.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First things first: you're going to destroy the nib of the Falcon by taking notes with it. Flex is as beautiful as it is ill suited to writing quickly with out of the box.

 

I have the 2000 in medium, and I have to say that it's a fine nib that also is particularly unremarkable, sharing many characteristics of the Lamy Safari (with slightly wetter flow, although that is somewhat debatable...)

 

So if you have the money to buy it (or your parents have given you the money to buy it -- do not hedge on them promising to buy it for you), I'd get the Falcon for the soft nib, but I'd bring the Safari to school for note taking. It's more or less guaranteed to not break or give any sort of fuss under normal use, and that (along with that it's cheap) is more important than it having an interesting nib.

 

I'm in college, and even though I have the VP and a 2000 my L2K stays in my backpack (for library work), and my Safari is typically the only pen that is taken out during class time.

Visconti Homo Sapiens; Lamy 2000; Unicomp Endurapro keyboard.

 

Free your mind -- go write

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Research a Pilot Custom with PO nib, finest nib and very smooth.

Walk in shadow / Walk in dread / Loosefish walk / As Like one dead

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...