Jump to content

Help Needed On A Lamy 2000. Cosmetic Issue


rushabhshah

Recommended Posts

My one year old, sparingly used lamy 2000 fp with the makrolon finish has developed mysterious whitish grey spots that just won't go. I've tried using a dry as well as a damp (with clean room temperature tap water) microfibre cloth to gently polish this away, but that didn't work. Did anyone ever face a similar issue. Would appreciate a solution, if any. I don't know the material quite well and am unaware of its properties and interactions with cleaning substances. I've already contacted lamy support, but past experiences with them haven't been satisfactory and never prompt.

 

I've attached some photos for reference. Hope they help.

 

Any suggestions will be highly appreciated.

 

Cheers!

rs

post-12108-0-98306100-1420564524_thumb.jpg

post-12108-0-48985400-1420564595_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • GTVi

    3

  • Ron Z

    2

  • rushabhshah

    2

  • Wolverine1

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Just use the pen and stop worrying about the white spots that are barely visible in the photos you posted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The photos makes the pen look glossier than it is and makes the spots look lighter than they actually are. Believe me, they are quite obvious when you hold the pen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can return the finish on a 2000 to a state pretty close to the original using a scratch pad. Really. I use a red one with light to moderate pressure going the length of the barrel and then the cap. It will be dull and a bit gray as it was at first, but that goes away rather quickly with use.

spacer.png
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At the end of the day, it's your pen, and only you know how you feel about it. I think your best way forward is to ask Lamy or do as Ron suggests.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is probably nothing that can be done to remove the blemishes. Don't use any abrasives as it will make the finish worse. You can try some mineral oil, very lightly with a microfibre cloth to try and mask the problem. If your lucky, Lamy may hopefully replace it under a manufacture's warranty.

 

My Lamy does not have any blemishes, but i keep it away from UV rays and never store in a leather pouch.

Edited by GTVi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is probably nothing that can be done to remove the blemishes. Don't use any abrasives as it will make the finish worse. You can try some mineral oil, very lightly with a microfibre cloth to try and mask the problem. If your lucky, Lamy may hopefully replace it under a manufacture's warranty.

 

My Lamy does not have any blemishes, but i keep it away from UV rays and never store in a leather pouch.

Really? I would not suggest that anyone apply mineral oil to any pen.

spacer.png
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That doesn't look like normal wear on a 2000. Looks like it got splashed with bleach or something.

Looking for a cap for a Sheaffer Touchdown Sentinel Deluxe Fat version

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My one year old, sparingly used lamy 2000 fp with the makrolon finish has developed mysterious whitish grey spots that just won't go. I've tried using a dry as well as a damp (with clean room temperature tap water) microfibre cloth to gently polish this away, but that didn't work. Did anyone ever face a similar issue. Would appreciate a solution, if any. I don't know the material quite well and am unaware of its properties and interactions with cleaning substances. I've already contacted lamy support, but past experiences with them haven't been satisfactory and never prompt.

 

I've attached some photos for reference. Hope they help.

 

Any suggestions will be highly appreciated.

 

Cheers!

rs

Pretty normal for a new Lamy2000 to develop these white patches when it sits unused. I find that the patches go away once you start using the pen, maybe due to the hand oils of the user. HTH.

In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really? I would not suggest that anyone apply mineral oil to any pen.

 

Doesn't your skin have oils?

 

That's OK, I would never advise anyone to use a scratch pad on their pens. :)

Edited by GTVi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty normal for a new Lamy2000 to develop these white patches when it sits unused. I find that the patches go away once you start using the pen, maybe due to the hand oils of the user. HTH.

 

Your on the money. The hand oils will help restore the surface of Makrolon, Mineral Oil (Paraffin oil in Aust) will speed it up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      43844
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      33676
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. inkstainedruth
      inkstainedruth
      26894
    5. jar
      jar
      26127
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Shanghai Knife Dude
      I have the Sailor Naginata and some fancy blade nibs coming after 2022 by a number of new workshop from China.  With all my respect, IMHO, they are all (bleep) in doing chinese characters.  Go use a bush, or at least a bush pen. 
    • A Smug Dill
      It is the reason why I'm so keen on the idea of a personal library — of pens, nibs, inks, paper products, etc. — and spent so much money, as well as time and effort, to “build” it for myself (because I can't simply remember everything, especially as I'm getting older fast) and my wife, so that we can “know”; and, instead of just disposing of what displeased us, or even just not good enough to be “given the time of day” against competition from >500 other pens and >500 other inks for our at
    • adamselene
      Agreed.  And I think it’s good to be aware of this early on and think about at the point of buying rather than rationalizing a purchase..
    • A Smug Dill
      Alas, one cannot know “good” without some idea of “bad” against which to contrast; and, as one of my former bosses (back when I was in my twenties) used to say, “on the scale of good to bad…”, it's a spectrum, not a dichotomy. Whereas subjectively acceptable (or tolerable) and unacceptable may well be a dichotomy to someone, and finding whether the threshold or cusp between them lies takes experiencing many degrees of less-than-ideal, especially if the decision is somehow influenced by factors o
    • adamselene
      I got my first real fountain pen on my 60th birthday and many hundreds of pens later I’ve often thought of what I should’ve known in the beginning. I have many pens, the majority of which have some objectionable feature. If they are too delicate, or can’t be posted, or they are too precious to face losing , still they are users, but only in very limited environments..  I have a big disliking for pens that have the cap jump into the air and fly off. I object to Pens that dry out, or leave blobs o
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files






×
×
  • Create New...