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Evening all,

 

I am getting two new bottles of ink (Diamine Apple Glory and the 150th Diamine Anniversary Blue Velvet) for Christmas so I only thought it right to get one new pen to put my favourite of the two in! (got the Rohrer and Klingner glass dip pen for the other ink!)

 

There are four (relatively inexpensive) pens I am looking at to take up the next berth in my collection. The Pilot Vanishing Point in the Blue Carbonesque finish, the Lamy 2000 and a Waterman Carene in either the amber finish or the Blue Obsession colour.

 

To give you an idea of my preferences I currently have a black Waterman Carene (love it), a MB 146 (love it), a Pelikan m800 (love it), an Edison Collier (wish it had a wider grip section) and a Waterman Expert II (don't love it, don't hate it either).

 

All the four options are pretty much the same price in the UK and I was wondering what everyone thought would be the best option? The Lamy 2000 has been raved about ever since time began but the design seems a bit too minimalist for my taste. The VP has also been reviewed well but I'm a bit concerned about the small ink capacity in the converter, I'm a student and I (try to) take a lot of notes every day. And I love my Carene and both the blue and amber finishes are stunning but I am thinking I should branch out a bit more! And if anyone has got an recommendations for another option for £100-150 then it would be greatly appreciated!

 

Cheers,

 

Chris

For in all things the woman is full of fear, not able to look upon battle or cold steel. But when she is

wounded over love no heart is more murderous.

Medea 263-266

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Personally I would go for the VP in a fine nib. This would be a great note taker for in class, due to the ease of use and not having to worry about losing a cap in class. Also out of all three options it seems as though it would add the most to your collection. If the smaller capacity really is an issue, just load up a vial with your favorite ink put it in a ziplock bag and through it in you backpack, just in case you run out. Good luck with whatever you decide on!

I am the artist formally known as Ambrose Bierce (I recently changed my username from that). If you love me you'll check out my blog http://fpinkgeek.blogspot.com/ or follow me on Instagram and Twitter @Fp_Ink_Geek :D

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Please take this as only one person's observation... If those pens you list in your existing stock are your usual fare, as much as I love the L2K, I think that you may not find it to be to your taste. To appreciate the L2K, it is a "sense of value" sort of pen. I love the minimalist design, I love the ability to disassemble easily for a thorough cleaning, or to swap a nib (which are easy to find in a trove of vintage Lamy models). I love its basic, "just works" design of the nib/feed/body. It's a perfect snap-cap pen. But I am a tinkerer, and there is no doubt that a percentage of new L2Ks suffer from minor QC issues that can be overcome, which I enjoy working with. Many do not. If you have already graduated to more luxury-level pens above and beyond the L2K, like the M800 and the MB 146, you may consider it to be a lesser pen, and just won't be drawn to it.

 

I find the L2K to be one of my favorite designs and writers of all time, and I have a large flock of Pelikans (which I also adore). There are a lot who agree with me on the L2K, but there are just as many that write the L2K off as a has-been pretender.

 

I would not recommend the VP either as it is a good pen but not really a great pen, and there is just as much or more hype about that pen as the L2K. The VP really comes down to personal preference. I'll admit that it offers something that none of the others do: retractability. It has great novelty to me. I keep one for that reason and I hardly ever use it. But I am not you, and it is one of those pens that should be experienced my any regular FP user.

 

My suggestion to consider as a possible alternative: Find a vintage 50s or 60s Pelikan like a 400 or 400NN to try instead.

 

Sorry for the long post... :blush:

Edited by risingsun

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Though my experience with it was a long, sad, story – of your three I would choose the Lamy 2000. The reason for that is that it is really iconic and unique. Once tuned, my EF wrote like a dream. I enjoyed every time I used it. YMMV

"how do I know what I think until I write it down?"

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A Parker 51, Chris.

It was good enough for Mr. Roosevelt, and Mr. Churchill, and Mr. DeGaul, and my Dad.

Seriously, it is as good as they say.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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From what you describe as your preferences - the Lamy 2000. Sounds like you enjoy western nibs and piston fillers, and this is the quintessential modern western piston filler. I know it looks minimalistic, but once you hold one in your hand.. its beauty and perfection of design reveal themselves.

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Man you are of a higher class than me. I do not consider those pens "inexpensive."

 

You mentioned you are a student. So here are my thoughts on that.

1 - You should always carry at least TWO pens, if not more. If one pen goes dry on your or fails, you switch to pen #2, or #3. It is always faster to switch pens than to fuss with the pen.

 

2 - Because of #1, ink capacity ceases to become a major factor. If you run dry, just switch to another pen.

 

3 - School (and work/office) is a high risk environment, to loose or have stolen your personal items. Hence I would NOT take any expensive pen to school. My school/work pen are inexpensive but GOOD writing pens, which if they were stolen or lost, would not be a financial impact to replace. (new: Pilot Metropolitan, Lamy Safari, Parker IM, etc., used: Parker 45, Parker 51, etc.). I carried 2 Parker 45s through undergrad and grad schools.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Chris,

 

Sounds like you have been in the game a lot longer than me and have some nice pens.

 

I just got my first Lamy 2K pen yesterday and what astonishes me is the balance of weight, size, ink capacity and performance. I picked it up and wanted to ink it right away. It's sturdy, durable, and bulletproof.

 

I WISH I had this pen while in grad school and doing clinical work, always on the run.

 

Do yourself a favor and find a shop where you can hold one, and preferably write with one. I have to tell, no pen is perfect, but the Lamy 2K feels, "just right," maintenance free, considering, and not a pen you will have to "BABY."

 

think about it and see for yourself. On paper, it sounds like it's the ticket. The texture of the makrolon is distinctive and allows good purchase, and then swims to the background. :thumbup:

 

“My tastes are simple: I am easily satisfied with the best.” - Winston Churchill

 

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To give you an idea of my preferences I currently have a black Waterman Carene (love it), a MB 146 (love it), a Pelikan m800 (love it), an Edison Collier (wish it had a wider grip section) and a Waterman Expert II (don't love it, don't hate it either).

 

Cheers,

 

Chris

 

I have a 146, two M800s, a VP and a Lamy 2k. All are worth owning IMO, but I'd buy a 2k before a VP if I had to start over.

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I'll also echo the suggestion of a 51. I myself have a 2000 in my collection, and having finally moved to broader nibs and luxury level pens, don't find myself picking up the 2000 as often anymore. Next to my Dialog 3 and stubbed 75 and 51, it just gets significantly less usage. It's a great writer, but it's also boring. In your situation, if a 51 is out of the question, I would pick the Carene again.

 

...Now, if you want something a bit more left-field, a fantasy Sheaffer Legacy is within your reach. Inlaid Sheaffer nibs, in general, are absolutely fantastic to write with, and would be a nice change of palette from your lineup.

Calculating.

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I'd suggest taking a look at the Monteverde pens which you can purchase from Andy's Pens in the UK http://www.andys-pens.ukhome.net/montepens.shtml

You mention that you like wide girth: the Prima or Napa might fit the bill. There are a variety of designs and colours depending upon how conservative you'd like the pen to be. They hold a fair amount of ink and are surprisingly well made for such inexpensive pens: Prima £50; Napa £90.

One of the nib options is a 1.1mm stub, but be warned that you may need to tweak the nib a little (flossing with brass shim) because they tend to be a little dry initially.

Have fun whatever you choose.

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I had a VP. Didnt like it. Nib was bouncy and the clip made holding it fiddly.

 

Have the Carene - a nice pen, but I agree, be adventurous!

 

I have 2 L2ks, a BB and a medium (as well as a bunch of others including MBs).

 

I keep putting my medium L2k back into rotation it is a brilliant all rounder.

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I would rule out the Pilot VP immediately - the clip gets in the way so that I can barely use it. Besides, the uncapping of a fountain pen for me is part of the pleasure.

 

The Lamy 2000 is a great choice. Reliabilty, smoothness and the purity of design all add up to a lovely pen for everyday use. As much as I enjoy the Carene, there isn't much point in owning more than one is there?

 

You could also venture into the world of Japanese pens - with Platinum, Sailor and Pilot (non VP), all having great writing instruments in that price bracket.

Pens and paper everywhere, yet all our hearts did sink,

 

Pens and paper everywhere, but not a drop of ink.

 

"Cursive writing does not mean what I think it does"

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If you have a chance to hold the VP, the common recommendation is that you should give it a try first. We have 3 of them at home, and they are incredibly convenient pens to have with you. No fuss with a cap, and they are great writing pens. The nib section is incredibly easy to replace or have worked on, and it's often (although not in this thread) a highly recommended pen.

 

The Lamy 2k is a good piston-filler. The material is industrial, the nibs are generally very good, and it's one that you can drag around anywhere. This pen is so understated at times that I often prefer other pens in my arsenal. A restored Parker "51" (aero or vac) will cost you about the same, has a nicer feel, has a vintage nib, and just-as-lasting ink reservoir. I should use the 2k more, but I don't. The only word of warning is also to get your hands on one to make sure the cap clip nubs don't bother you.

 

In your price range, you can consider some of the bigger and wider pens out there. A restored Parker Vac comes to mind as well as the Parker Duofold. For modern pens, you already have a good selection of European manufacturers, so you could take a look at the Japanese pens. The Sailor 1911 or Pro Gear have a thicker section but are very light. The Platinum Century and #3776 are light, cigar-shaped, and have a medium grip. Pilot makes a wide range of pens for every budget, and you could choose far more than just a VP.

 

Good luck.

 

Buzz

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What about a Pilot Custom Heritage 92 (piston filler) or a Pilot CH 823 (vac fill) or a Pilot CH 912 with a con-70 converter? I'm a big fan of Pilot's pens, and am very impressed by the feel and quality of their nibs. These ones have big ink capacities and with a Japanese F (or FM) nib, they should last you through your classes. I like my 92 so much I'm going to get another, as well as a 912. The 912 has the expanded option of nibs as well, from FA (Falcon) to Stub :)

Edited by nyx_h

Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel.

~ Mark Twain

----------------

Pen and Inkstagram!

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or a Pilot CH 912 with a con-70 converter? I'm a big fan of Pilot's pens, and am very impressed by the feel and quality of their nibs. These ones have big ink capacities and with a Japanese F (or FM) nib, they should last you through your classes. I like my 92 so much I'm going to get another, as well as a 912. The 912 has the expanded option of nibs as well, from FA (Falcon) to Stub :)

 

I leave for Asia in 4 days and unless something CRAZY happens, I am coming back with a CH 912 and can hardly wait.

 

I have to agree with Pilot nibs, they are superb. The first one I bought wasn't for me, but I could still tell it was a fantastic example and did what it was supposed to do, beautifully.

 

“My tastes are simple: I am easily satisfied with the best.” - Winston Churchill

 

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I leave for Asia in 4 days and unless something CRAZY happens, I am coming back with a CH 912 and can hardly wait.

 

I have to agree with Pilot nibs, they are superb. The first one I bought wasn't for me, but I could still tell it was a fantastic example and did what it was supposed to do, beautifully.

 

Nice! Which country/ies are you going to? The 912 really is beautiful. What nib are you going to get on it?

Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel.

~ Mark Twain

----------------

Pen and Inkstagram!

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I will echo the thought that if at all possible you need to actually hold the pens and try them.

 

I've never even held a Waterman Carene so can't comment on that one. I have several Pilot VP's in both M and F nibs. They are for me real workhorses. When I worked in sales and was on the 'floor' I found them very convenient without having to worry about caps.

 

I also have a Lamy 2000 M nib. Very smooth and I love using it. It is a bit big in girth, even compared to the VP. Hence the need for a test drive.

 

And I'll back up the general feeling that Pilot nibs are great; a couple of Pilot Metropolitans would be cheap and yet write smooth and dependably. Pelikans and Parker 51's and 45's are also all great choices as workhorses.

 

Yeah, I know. Too many choices!

Moshe ben David

 

"Behold, He who watches over Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps!"

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Nice! Which country/ies are you going to? The 912 really is beautiful. What nib are you going to get on it?

 

I will be visiting and staying in Taipei, but will be traveling to Tokyo and HK.

 

I am looking at the SU or "stub" nib, just because I love they way they write. But I am open to suggestions and it is my hope I will be able to try a handful of nibs given the shops I will visit.

 

Are you pleased with yours? What nib?

 

“My tastes are simple: I am easily satisfied with the best.” - Winston Churchill

 

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I will be visiting and staying in Taipei, but will be traveling to Tokyo and HK.

 

I am looking at the SU or "stub" nib, just because I love they way they write. But I am open to suggestions and it is my hope I will be able to try a handful of nibs given the shops I will visit.

 

Are you pleased with yours? What nib?

 

Ha, when I get my 912 I was going to get a stub nib on it too! :thumbup:

 

Currently I have a VP Decimo with a broad nib and a Custom Heritage 92 with soft-medium nib (swapped from a 91). Really nice nibs, very springy, with wet and thick lines!! for a Japanese pen. The 92 is the only pen I currently own that I would get a second of, next time with a FM nib. I have a Pilot Deluxe Seigaiha as well which writes amazingly :wub:

Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel.

~ Mark Twain

----------------

Pen and Inkstagram!

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