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Romillo Nervión


mongrelnomad
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I have no idea about the Romillo feeds, where did you read my description of the Romillo feed?

 

Go to this thread: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/147746-my-new-romillo-pen/. Read the postings on 11 Sept 2012. There, fountainbel described the characteristics of the feed that you had described in a response to a question I posed about whether ebonite feeds leak. This description was on 15 Sept 2014, on this thread: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/213929-ebonite-feed/. I cited this description above. You responded to fountainbel's post by indicating that the review was from 2010. Do you want to modify or amplify the information you posted? Do you agree with what fountainbel said about the Romillo? Do you concur with mongrelnomad, that it is normal for Romillo pens to leak because they don't have shut-off values and/or because of the eyedropper mechanisms?

Edited by prf5
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Go to this thread: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/147746-my-new-romillo-pen/. Read the postings on 11 Sept 2012. There, fountainbel described the characteristics of the feed that you had described in a response to a question I posed about whether ebonite feeds leak. This description was on 15 Sept 2014, on this thread: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/213929-ebonite-feed/. I cited this description above. Interestingly, you responded directly to fountainbel's post by indicating that the review was from 2010.

 

1) Do you want to modify or amplify the information you posted? 2) Do you agree with what fountainbel said about the Romillo? 3) Do you concur with mongrelnomad, that it is normal for Romillo pens to leak because they don't have shut-off values? 4) Do you concur with me, that the multiple leaks that he reported indicate that his pen has a defect that can be repaired?

I see. :) In that march 2010 thread pictures, the feeder used by Romillo is a plastic one and Francis noted much later (in 2012) that it was the older style and the newer styles issued by Bock are different and I agree with him. Having said that, I am not aware what style and material feeder is fitted to Mongrelnomad's pen, there is possibility things changed between 2012 and today and there is no pic of the feeder in this thread.

 

Mongrelnomad has not gone into the details on the leakage events. to answer your questions 3 and 4, It is important to know how the pens were carried and if it was ensured that the pen is nib up at all times.

 

For me, there are two important peculiarities in this pen. Firstly the use of the material brass in the ink path, secondly the placement of the threads for the cap on the section itself, I imagine it will be a constant Russian roulette: which joint will unscrew first: the cap to section joint (desirable) or the section to barrel joint(disaster).

 

At the end of the day if the bride and groom are happy with each other despite their faults and blemishes and shortcomings, I am not one to interfere.

Edited by hari317

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At the end of the day if the bride and groom are happy with each other despite their faults and blemishes and shortcomings, I am not one to interfere.

 

I appreciate your drawing attention to the brass material and placement of threads. The pictures that were posted made me wonder about that as well. Sure enough, if the parties are happy, then bless them both. However, this individual posted a review on a fountain pen website. No review is comprehensive, but in this case there are gaps that could have been addressed by responding directly to questions about the ebonite finish and the feeder. I am left to wonder whether the leaking that was described is typical of the Romillo line, whether it tends to occur in the Nervion model but not others, or whether the pen in question is defective, an old model, or a factory second. Perhaps other Romillo owners can shed light on how their pens perform.

Edited by prf5
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I have never had the chance to try a Romillo but indeed it is very unique, when I will have one day a very big pen budget I might hesitate between this pen and a danitrio

Edited by georges zaslavsky

Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

 

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I see. :) In that march 2010 thread pictures, the feeder used by Romillo is a plastic one and Francis noted much later (in 2012) that it was the older style and the newer styles issued by Bock are different and I agree with him. Having said that, I am not aware what style and material feeder is fitted to Mongrelnomad's pen, there is possibility things changed between 2012 and today and there is no pic of the feeder in this thread.

Looks the feed on this pen happens to be the size 8 hard rubber feed from Bock

 

Mongrelnomad has not gone into the details on the leakage events. to answer your questions 3 and 4, It is important to know how the pens were carried and if it was ensured that the pen is nib up at all times.

 

For me, there are two important peculiarities in this pen. Firstly the use of the material brass in the ink path, secondly the placement of the threads for the cap on the section itself, I imagine it will be a constant Russian roulette: which joint will unscrew first: the cap to section joint (desirable) or the section to barrel joint(disaster).

 

At the end of the day if the bride and groom are happy with each other despite their faults and blemishes and shortcomings, I am not one to interfere.

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...

Looks the feed on this pen happens to be the size 8 hard rubber feed from Bock

 

Indeed looks like it. I went back to the review now and noticed the picture of the feed, I had missed seeing it the first time around.

In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

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Interesting, Francis and Hari, although it would be surprising (and a bit disappointing) if this were true, as it would mean the feed were the only part on the entire pen not proprietary...

Too many pens; too little writing.

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Interesting, Francis and Hari, although it would be surprising (and a bit disappointing) if this were true, as it would mean the feed were the only part on the entire pen not proprietary...

Although I can't assure you for 100% the feed is originating from Bock, I'm nearly sure it is

Given the mechanical operations needed to make such a quality HR feed, It would not surprise me Romillo opted for a HR Bock feed.

The version on your pen is a slightly older BOCK version,on the latest version the visual part of the feed being flattened at the rear

You should surely not be disappointed, this is an excellent feed which can store a serious amount of ink between the thin fins !

In fact Conid uses identical feeds for the Kingsize Bulk filler.

Francis

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  • 1 year later...

For me, there are two important peculiarities in this pen. Firstly the use of the material brass in the ink path, secondly the placement of the threads for the cap on the section itself, I imagine it will be a constant Russian roulette: which joint will unscrew first: the cap to section joint (desirable) or the section to barrel joint(disaster).

I initially thought the thread placement was odd too. Having owned an Eo #9 for over six months, however, I'm less concerned. The section to barrel threads are metal and pretty tight - you have to make an effort to open or close them. No extreme effort is needed or anything - but I don't think someone could absentmindedly unscrew the section to barrel joint. The cap to section threads are ebonite to ebonite and screw on and off very easily.

 

The metal in the ink path is described as "solid bronze, finished with gold." I assume that means gold-plated. Don't know if bronze makes a difference in corrosion-susceptibility over brass. It is a strange material choice but all seems well on my pen (and I assume the other Romillo pens out there?)

Edited by rpsyed
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I initially thought the thread placement was odd too. Having owned an Eo #9 for over six months, however, I'm less concerned. The section to barrel threads are metal and pretty tight - you have to make an effort to open or close them. No extreme effort is needed or anything - but I don't think someone could absentmindedly unscrew the section to barrel joint. The cap to section threads are ebonite to ebonite and screw on and off very easily.

 

The metal in the ink path is described as "solid bronze, finished with gold." I assume that means gold-plated. Don't know if bronze makes a difference in corrosion-susceptibility over brass. It is a strange material choice but all seems well on my pen (and I assume the other Romillo pens out there?)

 

both the section threads as well as barrel threads are metal?

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both the section threads as well as barrel threads are metal?

Yep. In a quick Google search, this picture seemed to show it best.

 

http://www.estilograficas.org/imagenes/examen/romillopens-narcea-black-eyedropper/romillopens-narcea-black-eyedropper-4.jpg

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Thanks! This pic makes it very clear. I would advise the use of some anti-seize compound, same material threads can seize and it can become difficult to part them.

In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Probably Romillo is the best craftsman making fountain pen in the world. The problem... is expensive, but if you want to buy the best quality, you have to pay for it. I think Romillo is going to be a legend.

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  • 2 months later...

Thank you for the beautiful review. I have a Hakase coming in this year which precludes me from even thinking about the Romillo, but that nib is gorgeous. I am a little conflicted as the reviews I've read have been mixed about the build quality of Romillo pens. This is understandable to a certain degree since Romillo pens are all hand-made, but still makes me wary. I have not heard complaint about Hakase's build quality. I am leaning towards getting a Romillo Nervion #9 when the budget allows, but still unsettled by the varying reports on the pen's build quality.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Damn. I curse the day that I happened upon this post. After much deliberation, had to order a Romillo Nervion in black ebonite with a .8 mm stub semi-flex nib :). Eagerly awaiting it. Also have a Hakase on order that I've been waiting for roughly 6 months now. The waiting part is the hardest. These will be my grail pens, and I'll probably start reducing my stock of fountain pens once I get them :).

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Damn. I curse the day that I happened upon this post. After much deliberation, had to order a Romillo Nervion in black ebonite with a .8 mm stub semi-flex nib :). Eagerly awaiting it. Also have a Hakase on order that I've been waiting for roughly 6 months now. The waiting part is the hardest. These will be my grail pens, and I'll probably start reducing my stock of fountain pens once I get them :).

Congrats! I've got an Eo #9 with a stub and and Essential #9 with a fine nib, along with a Sil #9 with a fine-medium nib currently on order. The Romillo nibs are really something special. I'm think you'll like it =]

 

I'm looking into a Hakase too, probably this summer after I graduate. The green celluloid, cocobolo, and black buffalo horn look are the most likely, I think. Which Hakase did you order?

 

The waiting game is tough though - I waited a year for a urushi Hakumin/Edison and around 8 months for an Eboya eyedropper -- it definitely tests your patience!

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Hi rpsyed! Thanks! I am looking forward to getting my first Romillo and I'm hoping that I will be able to enjoy my semi-flex nib. My only concern is that the semi-flex might be a "noodle" or too flexy - I'm used to pretty rigid nibs, but wanted a nib that could flex and give some crazy line variation as I wanted to learn copper plate calligraphy.

 

You have an awesome collection of Romillos :). How are you liking them?

 

I initially ordered an ebonite Hakase in torpedo shape as they other options were too expensive. Unfortunately, you have a lot of time on your hands to change your mind when you have a year to wait for your pen :). I ended up writing to Mr. Yamamoto recently and changed my order to a African Ebony with the largest nib (semi-flex medium stub). I'm sweating paying for it, but I'm also excited about getting it. What Hakase were you thinking about getting? My second option would have been a buffalo horn or rosewood.

 

What are you currently studying? I felt so liberated when I graduated from law school/business school. It was exhilarating to finally be earning a living until I discovered all the obligations that come with the privilege of being employed :).

 

The waiting is excruciating. I figured it would get easier as the wait time was reduced, but I actually find it to be more oppressive. But, as someone recently said, the wait actually lends to the experience and makes the bespoke pens all the more special :).

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Hi rpsyed! Thanks! I am looking forward to getting my first Romillo and I'm hoping that I will be able to enjoy my semi-flex nib. My only concern is that the semi-flex might be a "noodle" or too flexy - I'm used to pretty rigid nibs, but wanted a nib that could flex and give some crazy line variation as I wanted to learn copper plate calligraphy.

 

You have an awesome collection of Romillos :). How are you liking them?

 

I initially ordered an ebonite Hakase in torpedo shape as they other options were too expensive. Unfortunately, you have a lot of time on your hands to change your mind when you have a year to wait for your pen :). I ended up writing to Mr. Yamamoto recently and changed my order to a African Ebony with the largest nib (semi-flex medium stub). I'm sweating paying for it, but I'm also excited about getting it. What Hakase were you thinking about getting? My second option would have been a buffalo horn or rosewood.

 

What are you currently studying? I felt so liberated when I graduated from law school/business school. It was exhilarating to finally be earning a living until I discovered all the obligations that come with the privilege of being employed :).

 

The waiting is excruciating. I figured it would get easier as the wait time was reduced, but I actually find it to be more oppressive. But, as someone recently said, the wait actually lends to the experience and makes the bespoke pens all the more special :).

I think your Romillo nib should be perfect. The semi-flex option on the #9 is definitely springy and gives line variation when asked, but it's no wet noodle. It definitely more for regular writing with the occasional flourishes. The K-nib, is the Romillo nib that's fully flexible. I've not used one before but I believe that would be more in line with the super soft/wet noodle you were fearing.

 

I love them! Can't wait to see the Sil #9. Apparently the red celluloid, which I wanted when I ordered my solid blue ebonite Essential #9, has been used up; I hope that Romillo will have some more in the future or maybe another color of ebonite or celluloid.

 

I think I'm going to go for the jade celluloid 15G. So the shape of the African Ebony pen below, but made of the jade celluloid. Still looking at my options though.

 

http://fp-hakase.com/products/97902015_06_23_R.JPG

 

Oh, nice, my sister is in law school currently. I'm studying journalism and will be graduating in May. The Hakase will be something of a graduation gift to myself :D

Edited by rpsyed
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I think your Romillo nib should be perfect. The semi-flex option on the #9 is definitely springy and gives line variation when asked, but it's no wet noodle. It definitely more for regular writing with the occasional flourishes. The K-nib, is the Romillo nib that's fully flexible. I've not used one before but I believe that would be more in line with the super soft/wet noodle you were fearing.

 

I love them! Can't wait to see the Sil #9. Apparently the red celluloid, which I wanted when I ordered my solid blue ebonite Essential #9, has been used up; I hope that Romillo will have some more in the future or maybe another color of ebonite or celluloid.

 

I think I'm going to go for the jade celluloid 15G. So the shape of the African Ebony pen below, but made of the jade celluloid. Still looking at my options though.

 

http://fp-hakase.com/products/97902015_06_23_R.JPG

 

Oh, nice, my sister is in law school currently. I'm studying journalism and will be graduating in May. The Hakase will be some of a graduation gift to myself :D

 

Hi rpsyed,

 

i just checked my invoice and it says that I chose the semi-flex option. Either way, I'm looking forward to getting my Romiillo and trying it out. I've heard fantastic things about their handmade #9 nibs and I can't wait to put one to use.

 

The jade celluloid should be pretty nice :). I'm not a fan of green pens or the celluloid material, so I ruled that out from the beginning. I quickly regretted choosing the ebonite material as it seemed so pedestrian for a handmade pen that was going to take approximately a year to make. I figure if I had to wait that long, I wanted the material to be really special. I'm no tree-hugger, but I didn't like the idea of harvesting material for a pen from a poor turtle or water buffalo, so I figured that I'd choose one of the woods. I have reservations about the use of African Ebony given how overexploited it is, but I wanted the pen to be made of a super rare material, so I opted for it over the other woods. I was going to change the shape of my pen from torpedo to flat-top, but Mr. Yamamoto had already made the gold furnishings for my pen and he said that he would have to move me back in the queue for such a drastic change :(. Understandable but disappointing. However, I do like the classic torpedo shape so I'm not that sad about it :). I'm just glad that the wait is almost over and I can look forward to getting my pen from Hakase in April 2016 :).

 

Graduating from school is quite an achievement. I wish i had three Romillos when I was in school :). Congrats on the achievement, and wish your sister luck from me. I know the rigors she facing, and I wish her the best.

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