Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Practical Difference Between Stub Nib & Italic Nib?



SomethingWicked

Recommended Posts

SomethingWicked

Please forgive the newbie question, but when I saw an Italicized nib, I thought it looked like a better version of a stub nib. Am I correct? Or does the stub create the kind of design that is more pronounced than an Italicized nib.

 

Does someone have a photo posted at FPN of the different writing styles?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 14
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • SomethingWicked

    6

  • FoszFay

    2

  • Ghost Plane

    1

  • ac12

    1

Check out the Franklin Christoph web site and read what they have to say about specialty nib info. There is a good diagram there. Richards Pens is always a good reference.

Edited by linearM
Link to post
Share on other sites

Stub will give broad down strokes, with narrower cross strokes. Very smooth on the down strokes, still relatively smooth on the cross strokes, which will around a F width.

 

Italics are broad and smooth on the down stroke, but a bit sharp and 'toothy' on the cross strokes, which will closer to an EF.

 

Italics will (IMHO) make you writing look more attractive, with the substantial line variation, however stubs will feel better to use.

 

Good luck.

Tom.

Edited by FoszFay
Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out the Franklin Christoph web site and read what they have to say about specialty nib info. There is a good diagram there. Richards Pens is always a good reference.

 

What he said - http://www.franklin-christoph.com/specialty-nib-info.html

 

Also, Mottishaw - http://nibs.com/Fountain-Pen-Nib-Customizations.htm

Franklin-Christoph, Italix, and Pilot pens are the best!
Iroshizuku, Diamine, and Waterman inks are my favorites!

Apica, Rhodia, and Clairefontaine make great paper!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another point worth mentioning is that there are no official standards to separate stubs from italics and companies decide for themselves how to brand their nibs. Some nibs advertised as stubs, for example sheaffer factory stubs, are actually more italic in shape and offer more line variation than some nibs advertised as italics, like for example conway stewart.

Edited by cellmatrix
Link to post
Share on other sites
SomethingWicked

Stub will give broad down strokes, with narrower cross strokes. Very smooth on the down strokes, still relatively smooth on the cross strokes, which will around a F width.

 

Italics are broad and smooth on the down stroke, but a bit sharp and 'toothy' on the cross strokes, which will closer to an EF.

 

Italics will (IMHO) make you writing look more attractive, with the substantial line variation, however stubs will feel better to use.

 

Good luck.

Tom.

 

 

Thank you very much, Tom. I appreciate you taking the time to paint me a picture. To me, they were serving the same purpose. Now I know what I should be investing it, which is an Italic, because I'm appreciate the effects. The question now, should I look for a vintage, or are new pens being manufactured that will write smoothly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
SomethingWicked

Italics have sharper corners, stubs more rounded for swift cursive. But the grinds vary across brands.

 

Ghost Plane,

Thank you for your rapid response. I appreciate your help. Please excuse my ignorance, but what are "grinds"?

Link to post
Share on other sites
SomethingWicked

Check out the Franklin Christoph web site and read what they have to say about specialty nib info. There is a good diagram there. Richards Pens is always a good reference.

 

LinearM, Thank you for the heads-up on Mr. Christoph.

 

I found his website and was very impressed. I bookmarked it also. Excellent info. I'm collecting websites like these to enrich my newbie knowledge and I thank you for another fine example.

Link to post
Share on other sites
SomethingWicked

 

Blue Moon,

 

Thank you for the great links! I kept reading about Mr. Mottishaw, but had not seen his website. Tell me, does your Italix pen carry a stub nib?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Thank you very much, Tom. I appreciate you taking the time to paint me a picture. To me, they were serving the same purpose. Now I know what I should be investing it, which is an Italic, because I'm appreciate the effects. The question now, should I look for a vintage, or are new pens being manufactured that will write smoothly.

Glad it helped. Personally, I don't like vintage pens (I like the modern look). I only have one, with a great flexible nib. It is great and I have heard lots of good things about vintage pens, but not much in general about stubs and italics.

 

I have a Lamy Safari with a 1.1 Italic nib. I recommend it. It has quite significant line variation, still reasonably smooth on side stokes, and I like (some people don't) the triangular grip section.

 

I also have a TWSBI 580 1.1 with a stub. I never use it; it never worked well from day one. Many people praise their customer service. Not me. I was lucky I purchased an EF unit at the same time.

 

Tom.

fpn_1410502147__img_20140912_160641.jpg

Edit: Chicken scratch photo added.

Edited by FoszFay
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have almost all of the nibs by lamy 3 now I have grounded on for my self... a B ground to a stub/Music 2 1.5 Italics ground to a right and left oblique

the stub broad... I'm not sure how to like it it is a stub but it doesnt say give character to my hand writing.... I just ground this one yesterday it probably doesnt help I'm a lefty side writer I pressume

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the italics describe the ratio between the vertical and horizontal strokes.

 

A round nib (stock on most fountain pens) would create the same width whether you are making a horizontal or vertical stroke. These nibs are usually smooth in all directions and easiest to use.

 

Italic nibs (stub, cursive, and crisp) are ground such that they make thin horizontal strokes and thick vertical strokes.

 

A stub italic has the least amount of variation between the horizontal and vertical strokes but is most forgiving regarding how you hold your pen. A cursive italic has a greater variation than the stub italic, but is more difficult to use. And a crisp italic has the most variation between vertical and horizontal strokes, but you need to position your hands perfectly or else you'll slice through the paper.

 

Stub italics are good for having some line variation while also allowing you to write quickly. Crisp italics almost always require you to write slowly and methodically, and are generally not recommended for beginners. Cursive italics are in the middle, and it really depends on who grinds your nibs as to how each nib will behave.

 

There are no set definitions for stub, cursive and crisp italic nibs. So one company's stub may be sharper than another company's cursive italic. What I would really like to see is a set definition of the three terms, based on horizontal width / vertical width. So for example, if there is a 1.0 mm italic nib, a stub would have a horizontal width of 0.35 mm, a cursive would have a horizontal width of .25, and a crisp italic would have a horizontal width of 0.15 mm. That way we could define stubs as having a .35 ratio, a cursive as a .25 ratio, and the crisp as having a .15 ratio. (the numbers are approximate, but you get the idea)...

 

PS I'm new here, if if I'm mistaken on any of my points, please do correct me :)

Edited by pendexter
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...