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Genetically Engineered Eucalyptus Trees, And The Implications For Better Fp Paper!



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I've recently become very interested in paper and pulp industries. My endless endeavours to finding the best FP paper really has taken me all over the globe.

 

I've come to realise that the qualities that make a paper FP friendly, normally stem from the predominant use of hardwood pulps. When I initially came to learn, that some of the papers I very much preferred, sourced their pulp from Brazil, I became somewhat concerned. I didn't want to support any industry that was destroying the majestic Amazon rainforest.

 

Later I learnt that this pulp was coming mostly from plantation Eucalyptus, which appeared to yield particularly well in Brazil on short 5-7 year cycles.

 

The trouble with eucalyptus is that it isn't particularly frost tolerant, so has had limited use as a plantation crop in the USA. However that is about to change.

 

Genetically engineered eucalyptus is here. A GM Eucalyptus that is frost hardy is about to have a very substantial field trial in the USA, and if successful, Eucalyptus pulp will become the most economical pulp manufactured in North America as well.

 

Any thoughts? FP paper, or genetically engineered trees in general?

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I would love to see the day when "Made in U.S.A." on a package of paper prompted me to buy it rather than drop it as if I'd picked up doggie doo. And if any paper made from GM eucalyptus trees is more than a bit FP-unfriendly I won't buy it—not because it's genetically-modified but because it's too FP-unfriendly. Assuming the price is right, FP-friendliness trumps everything for me.

Edited by Bookman

I love the smell of fountain pen ink in the morning.

 

 

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The good thing is that if you don't like the paper you can feed the remainder to a koala!

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tendollarword

Yes, but will there be frost-resistant koalas to go with them?

"Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."

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Considering these are invasive species, I can see another version of the infamous kudzu being visited upon us. Let's see... I'm already living with killer pythons, walking catfish, hydrangea boat-killers, giant African snails & a whole host of other problems some bright soul decided to turn loose on Florida. Now I need trees that can't be gotten rid of?

 

Arrrrrrrrrrgh!

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Considering these are invasive species, I can see another version of the infamous kudzu being visited upon us. Let's see... I'm already living with killer pythons, walking catfish, hydrangea boat-killers, giant African snails & a whole host of other problems some bright soul decided to turn loose on Florida. Now I need trees that can't be gotten rid of?

 

Arrrrrrrrrrgh!

Sorry, the eucalyptus boat sailed loooooooong ago. All over central and southern California, mostly from trees planted as a quick firewood supply back in the 1870s. And that was after they'd been imported into throughout Europe, northern Africa, India, and South America. Burns pretty well, though.

 

Even if you didn't intend to light off the Oakland hills.

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Gee, Ghost Plane, you should have read a few Piers Anthony and Carl Hiaasen books before deciding to move to Florida! Anyone who reads these (or Dave Barry's columns and books) knows that Florida is W.E.I.R.D. :D

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Gee, Ghost Plane, you should have read a few Piers Anthony and Carl Hiaasen books before deciding to move to Florida! Anyone who reads these (or Dave Barry's columns and books) knows that Florida is W.E.I.R.D. :D

Um, did I mention I was born here?

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I've worked in the greenhouses that produce the eucalyptus you're speaking of. Produced by...do your research here because I don't want to name the company because I might want to work there again... in Ridgeville, SC.

 

The eucalyptus that is grown for pulp can not reproduce so the danger of it becoming invasive in the US is nill. It is bred not to flower, which they normally do around 7 years old. The trees are all closely monitored by APHIS from the time they are formed in the labs by somatic embryogenesis or grown from seed lots.

The argument of the massive plantations and deforestation is something I find invalid as well. The land owners dedicate x amount of whatever acres to producing a consumable. The crop gets turned over every 10-15 years or so. By using only one small piece of land, comparatively, it eases the pressure on the rest of the forest.

 

The R&D for these trees is extremely expensive and takes years to find a line that has everything you want and then grow it out. That's why you won't see much more of these in the future. They have pretty much abandoned all r&d on it except for a few things.

But what you will see is a particular line of sweet gum that grows faster and has a higher yield than eucalyptus, does not have any regulations from the government because its not genetically engineered and is what the big paper makers, IP and such, are demanding.

 

In conclusion, hardwood paper is going to be OK and it won't likely be coming from eucalyptus that much more.

Edited by 69Boss302
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However, one of Australia's major wood-pulp companies has gone broke because nobody in our part of the world wants to buy tree pulp any more for paper. Instead more and more paper is being made from rapidly-growing (6 weeks to harvesting) bamboo and sugar cane pulp.

 

This paper tends to be very FP-friendly, as well as economically and environmentally sound.

 

I think the eucalyptus boat has sailed, unless you want, as inkypete said, to grow koalas as a by-product.

fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif




“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.


And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”


Granny Aching

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Truth is a defense. I'll happily embrace the weird.

 

Hence the Smiley Face with my first remark; I rarely use emoticons.

 

I have lived significant portions of my adult life in Austin, Texas. What could be weirder? And I, too, embrace it with pleasure!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Odd how the "gum tree" has become both friend and foe.

 

I recall visiting Australia for the first time decades back and seeing all of the varieties of the eucalypts across the vast spaces of the country from Tasmania to Bathurst Island, and marveling at the different looks of the trees, then to move to California later, and find them almost everywhere, to some people a pest of a growth, to others a fragrant source of shade. Little did I suspect that this would become a source of paper for my fountain pens !

 

What's next, tea tree scented fountain pen ink ? <wry smile>

 

 

 

John P.

Edited by PJohnP
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I would love to see the day when "Made in U.S.A." on a package of paper prompted me to buy it rather than drop it as if I'd picked up doggie doo.

100% cotton Cranes

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I've recently become very interested in paper and pulp industries. My endless endeavours to finding the best FP paper really has taken me all over the globe.

 

I've come to realise that the qualities that make a paper FP friendly, normally stem from the predominant use of hardwood pulps. When I initially came to learn, that some of the papers I very much preferred, sourced their pulp from Brazil, I became somewhat concerned. I didn't want to support any industry that was destroying the majestic Amazon rainforest.

 

Later I learnt that this pulp was coming mostly from plantation Eucalyptus, which appeared to yield particularly well in Brazil on short 5-7 year cycles.

 

The trouble with eucalyptus is that it isn't particularly frost tolerant, so has had limited use as a plantation crop in the USA. However that is about to change.

 

Genetically engineered eucalyptus is here. A GM Eucalyptus that is frost hardy is about to have a very substantial field trial in the USA, and if successful, Eucalyptus pulp will become the most economical pulp manufactured in North America as well.

 

Any thoughts? FP paper, or genetically engineered trees in general?

 

I think my great-uncle Boris had a lot to do with bringing a paper industry to Brazil. I was visiting him long ago, and he mentioned that they had to import Eucalyptus, because among other reasons, they are fast-growing. I think another reason is they are insect-resistant and tolerate heat, whereas maples and oaks are slow-growing and require a temperate climate. The problem with Eucalyptus, he told us, was that the fiber makes weak paper. He demonstrated with a brown paper bag, the kind you receive when you buy something in a shop. It fell apart if you moistened it just a little.

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I think my great-uncle Boris had a lot to do with bringing a paper industry to Brazil. I was visiting him long ago, and he mentioned that they had to import Eucalyptus, because among other reasons, they are fast-growing. I think another reason is they are insect-resistant and tolerate heat, whereas maples and oaks are slow-growing and require a temperate climate. The problem with Eucalyptus, he told us, was that the fiber makes weak paper. He demonstrated with a brown paper bag, the kind you receive when you buy something in a shop. It fell apart if you moistened it just a little.

This is true, which is precisely why kraft pulp, derived from softwoods such as spruce is more expensive than hardwood pulps, such as eucalyptus pulp. Hardwood pulps, which are dominated by eucalyptus pulps, are the main constituent of tissue papers, and also speciality papers such as writing paper. The latter however will almost always require some kraft pulp to impart strength to the sheet.

 

Kraft pulp can also be replaced with bamboo pulp, which also has very long fibres like softwood pulps. It also has the benefit of incredibly rapid growth, and tolerance of a wide variety of climatic conditions..

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