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Europe: Pilot Mr <M> Vs. <F>


tomkeb
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Pilot MR (for european FP users only!)  

35 members have voted

  1. 1. If you were to buy just one Pilot MR in Europe, which nib would you choose?

  2. 2. Which cartridge/converter system would you prefer in that pen?

    • international cartridges/no converter option
    • Pilot c/c, possible to use CON-20 or CON-50


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Dear european FP users,

 

some time ago I enquired Pilot, whether they will introduce the MR (also known as Metropolitan) with the <F> nib. They responded negatively, claiming that the <F> nib is not used in Europe as much as <M>. It came to my mind to start this poll to find out.

 

Edit: It might be also interesting to find out which c/c system the people of Europe on this poll prefer in the MR.

Edited by tomkeb

http://imageshack.com/scaled/large/16/k6ic.png

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Hi tomkeb, I own a MR with an M-nib which I like very much, it's super smooth and comfortable. I also own a Prera (with a F-nib) which nib I don't like because of the scratchyness of it.

I switched both nibs and now I have a wonderful Prera with a very smooth M-nib.

So, my vote goes for the M-nib, there remains to tell me I'm a lefty.

International cartridges are easy to buy and are in a great choice of colors.

 

Gr, Ruud

A good fountainpen is an edc reliable writing tool

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Voted M and international. Unless the CON70 could be used, I like that little pump.

 

Not fond of the standard international converters as they often give flow issues, so happy with just carts.

 

 

D.ick

~

KEEP SAFE, WEAR A MASK, KEEP A DISTANCE.

Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

~

 

 

 

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I'm not sure there is anything wrong with the standard Metropolitan in Medium... The one I received writes very nicely. Why change a good thing?

Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers ~ Voltaire

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It depends.

 

If you're taking technical notes, possibly on poor quality paper, go for the F.

 

If you're writing letters on 25% cotton paper, go for the M.

 

The F is not "scratchy", the problem is that it's somewhere between Japanese EF and F. Finer that one would normally expect.

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I'm not sure there is anything wrong with the standard Metropolitan in Medium... The one I received writes very nicely. Why change a good thing?

 

I am not saying there is anything wrong with it. I am just trying to find out if the Pilot's excuse about "<F> not being used in Europe" is legit.

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Most Europeans use M or F in European sizes. Knowing Japanese sizes run narrow, their F would be an XF here in Europe

 

Chances are they would indeed not sell much.

 

And AFAIK Pilot Europe is handled mostly from Germany and they seem not happy about too much hassle.

One size is easy for them, just have to hold stock of 1 type.

 

Not that I like it that way...

 

D.ick

~

KEEP SAFE, WEAR A MASK, KEEP A DISTANCE.

Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

~

 

 

 

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Would need a good converter...in any cartridge is only for rich folks.

Don't use an EF= Japanese F.

Would have to be a Japanese M= Western F.

 

Metropolitan is a cheap pen?

I'm not into C/C pens why should I buy it? What makes is special?

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Most Europeans use M or F in European sizes. Knowing Japanese sizes run narrow, their F would be an XF here in Europe

 

Chances are they would indeed not sell much.

 

And AFAIK Pilot Europe is handled mostly from Germany and they seem not happy about too much hassle.

One size is easy for them, just have to hold stock of 1 type.

 

Not that I like it that way...

 

D.ick

 

I believe the same could be said about the US (western = european M and F nib sizes being used the most), yet both options (japanese M and F) are offered there.

 

On the other hand, in the US the <F> Metropolitan was released after many bloggers reviewed the original <M> version and complained about the lack of choice. Just a few people blog about pens/writing utensils in Europe.

Edited by tomkeb

http://imageshack.com/scaled/large/16/k6ic.png

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I have two M Metros. Both smooth, but one of them tends to write broader than I'd like. I have one F and it's heaven. It's very fine, but that nib sings!

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Wow, Brooklyn and Ontario are now in Europe!! I really must make more of an effort to keep up with international news. :P

 

I voted F. I'm loving my Pilot Custom 74 in F, and now wish I had a Prera in F, not the M that I already have.

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Before I even had a Pilot pen I was confused as to why anyone would want the Pilot C/C system as it's not "standard". But course after using pilot I like their C/C system more than standard international for a couple of reasons:

 

  • The wider opening on the cartridge and converters means that the feed is the bottleneck to ink flow, not the cartridge/nipple.
  • The wider cartridge/converter diameter means some inks are less likely to stick to the back (less surface tension)
  • The wider opening makes it easier to syringe fill or clean a cartridge
  • Their cartridges hold twice as much ink as a standard international
  • The con-20 (especially the default "cleaning converter") is probably one of the best removable 'squeeze' converters I've used

Far as fine vs medium, especially if I was in a market where Japanese pens are not as common. I'd go with fine simply because that's one of the perks about getting a Japanese pen, and because the metropolitan's (or most of Pilot's cheaper fine nibs) are pretty fine while also being decent on the wetness and flow. I find the metropolitan's medium nib tends to be a bit too wet depending on the ink.

 

A pilot black cartridge also flows wonderfully in the fine nib (as does most of the iroshizuku inks, and some of my wetter noodler's inks).

 

The medium nib was however much smoother out of the box. The fine was decent but had some extra tooth, nothing a little micro-mesh couldn't fix.

Edited by KBeezie
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