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Pen And Ink For Lefties



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william2001

I'll start by telling you that I am a lefty (uses left hand to write).

I heard that wet pens and inks are bad for lefties because they are likely to get ink on their hands as they slide over what they wrote.

What pen and/or ink do you recommend for lefties?

I heard that inks that dry fast are good.

Thank you in advance. :)

-William S. Park

EDIT: I had grammar issues.

Edited by william2001

“My two fingers on a typewriter have never connected with my brain. My hand on a pen does. A fountain pen, of course. Ball-point pens are only good for filling out forms on a plane. - Graham Greene

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underwriter or overwriter?

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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It depends if you are an over or under the line writer and the angle you have the paper orientated.

 

Also important is the type of paper you are using glossy non-absorbent papers tend to be slow trying and likely to be subject to smearing or an extended period.

 

I would recommend getting some blotting paper as well.

sinistral hypergraphica - a slurry of ink

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This can vary, because left-handed writers can hold their fountain pens in many different ways. As the others have already indicated, most lefties are either underwriters or overwriters—but there are other options, too. John Mottishaw has a great page with photos on his website:

http://www.nibs.com/Left-hand%20writers.htm

 

I'm a lefty underwriter and don't use anything special.

 

As a general rule, overwriters will prefer faster-drying inks (and possibly finer nibs) to counteract smearing. Inks that come to mind are Noodler's Bernanke Black and Bernanke Blue, Private Reserve Fast Dry inks, and the Pelikan 4001 series.

 

Also, Lamy makes left-handed nibs. Never used these; I only know they exist.

 

Hope this helps!

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imleftyoureright

I'm an overwriter and curl around enough that I've had few issues. Using a dry ink and a dry pen could lead to some unpleasant results so one or the other starting out should do you fine I would guess.

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you will need help if your a side writer and an over writer (underwriters dont need much attention especially if your trained in copperplate more so)

I'm a both myself since I'm a side writer at a relaxed state then going to over writer hooked when I start to get into the middle of the paper

inks huh I prefer to probably use a drier pen a stock TWSBI, Sailor Lecoule, some pens from Muji for example... unless you like more shading inks I also use Kiwaguro as my black base but there's also take-sumi

I also happen to have a very wet pen from Faber-Castell (Ambition in Coconut) but since I rarely use it other than occasional use thinking I'll probably have problems since most of my inks are a bit on the wet side

also I don't use Rhodia as my paper but I have other papers if ever needed Muji is somewhat fine but I normally use Victoria's Journal Coppelle and Venzi for journaling these are good absorbent paper so you will have smaller problems later on but feel free to use Rhodia if your going to make reviews or what not

Edited by Algester
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As Elenita said "Also, Lamy makes left-handed nibs. Never used these; I only know they exist."

They (LH) aren't much different from the regular M nibs in my experience maybe a touch smoother.

Lamy also have beginner's nibs (A) found by default in their wooden ABC pens but can often be had as a nib option on other Lamy pens; these are around M size with a larger "sweet spot".

sinistral hypergraphica - a slurry of ink

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Using a fountain pen has helped my writing style as a leftie. I don't do anything unusual, and my palm is ink-free. It's probably due to the little bit of time I spent practicing how I write that helped.

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Hi,

 

Smear/Dry times for ink is very dependent on the paper's absorbency.

 

To achieve prompt drying on most papers, even the coated writing papers, the ingenious Mr Tardiff brought us the Noodler's Bernanke series of inks. I sampled the Blue ink, and found it dried exceptionally fast. It does have the trade-off of giving a bit of line-width gain and is more likely to bleed-through some papers, but nothing that I consider a deal breaker.

 

Bye,

S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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I am left handed. I overwrite and underwrite. I have always found that special products make no difference. I think this is overthink. There are a lot of left handed people. They manage.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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