Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Gold Or Gold Plated?


londonbooks
 Share

Recommended Posts

I would like to know if there is a way to tell if a nib is solid gold or just gold-plated (without scratching the nib)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 13
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Garageboy

    2

  • cellmatrix

    1

  • londonbooks

    2

  • william2001

    1

A gold nib will generally have 14K or some such marking whereas a plated nib will not. A plated nib is also usually steel and you can check it with a magnet.

PAKMAN

minibanner.gif                                    Vanness-world-final.png.c1b120b90855ce70a8fd70dd342ebc00.png

                         My Favorite Pen Restorer                                             My Favorite Pen Store

                                                                                                                                Vanness Pens - Selling Online!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What he said. K or C indicates (or claims to) solid gold of whatever Carat purity, while KGP indicates gold plated. None of the above means there's probably no gold in or on it.

Edited by Samthor
Link to comment
Share on other sites

the magnet test is the best one available but there are plated nibs out there that will not respond to the magnet.

 

on vintage nibs they would often hide the word "plated" on the nib so that the section covers it. there are a couple clues that are usually a clear sign the nib is plated. if a vintage nib has a dark black oxidization that does not rub off the raised surface with a little bit of water it is likely plated. plated nibs will often have oxidization with a texture. if the nib is clean check along the sides of the nib because these are one of the first places the plating will start to go. look closely at the shape of the tipping and the area where the tipping meets the gold of the nib. on a plated nib the tipping is often just rolled steel and it will look quite different than iridium tipping. there are a couple phrases that will often appear on plated nibs "iridium point germany" "durum tipped"

 

hope this helps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the magnet test is the best one available but there are plated nibs out there that will not respond to the magnet.

 

on vintage nibs they would often hide the word "plated" on the nib so that the section covers it. there are a couple clues that are usually a clear sign the nib is plated. if a vintage nib has a dark black oxidization that does not rub off the raised surface with a little bit of water it is likely plated. plated nibs will often have oxidization with a texture. if the nib is clean check along the sides of the nib because these are one of the first places the plating will start to go. look closely at the shape of the tipping and the area where the tipping meets the gold of the nib. on a plated nib the tipping is often just rolled steel and it will look quite different than iridium tipping. there are a couple phrases that will often appear on plated nibs "iridium point germany" "durum tipped"

 

hope this helps

 

That definitely helps and I thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The response to a magnet test depends on the type of steel used. Martensitic and austenitic steels have both be used for nib manufacture. Martensitic steels will tend to show an attraction to a magnet whereas austenitic steels either have a weak draw or none that is detectable. The best way to determine if a nib is plated is to look for a marking such as 585 or 750 (for 14 karat and 18 carat respectively) or indeed the Karat. If the number is preceded with a fraction such as 1/20 this indicates it is plated, the fraction being that of gold to the substrate metal. If there is no mark showing the Kt of gold, this may indicate it is plated, though with older nibs, the markings may have been polished off over time. As balson says above, visual inspection can often give a clue in such situations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A gold nib will have a Karat markings on it.

If it doesn't have a Karat marking, it might be plated.

-William S. Park

Edited by william2001

“My two fingers on a typewriter have never connected with my brain. My hand on a pen does. A fountain pen, of course. Ball-point pens are only good for filling out forms on a plane. - Graham Greene

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A gold nib will have a Karat markings on it.

 

 

Not true. It would make things simple if it were true, but alas, not so. Speaking as an American, I can say that because American law doesn't require the labeling of gold in that way, many American gold nibs carry no indication that they are made of gold.

 

To make things just a little more confusing, there are nibs that appear to say, for example, "14K," but if you remove the nib entirely from the pen you will find the word "PLATED," neatly hidden under the section when the pen is assembled.

 

In this world there is a lot to know, and we all learn one day at a time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Not true. It would make things simple if it were true, but alas, not so. Speaking as an American, I can say that because American law doesn't require the labeling of gold in that way, many American gold nibs carry no indication that they are made of gold.

 

To make things just a little more confusing, there are nibs that appear to say, for example, "14K," but if you remove the nib entirely from the pen you will find the word "PLATED," neatly hidden under the section when the pen is assembled.

 

In this world there is a lot to know, and we all learn one day at a time.

 

Very clever, that. Sneaky, but you have to admire their cunning :P

 

Anyway, yeah, the magnet test is usually what I fall back on, if researching the pen doesn't turn up anything. For the most part though, you'll be able to tell whether a pen is gold or steel by the springiness of the nib, though that'd take some level of familiarity with both types of nibs.

 

 

Kevin

"The price of an object should not only be what you had to pay for it, but also what you've had to sacrifice in order to obtain it." - <i>The Wisdom of The Internet</i><p class='bbc_center'><center><img src="http://i59.tinypic.com/jr4g43.jpg"/></center>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a lot of JoWo nibs that are stainless & plated that are not magnetic.

 

If the nib says 'Iridium Point Germany' or just 'Iridium Point', it is more likely to be plated than not. Gold nibs usually like to say so..

 

Regards,

 

Richard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...