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Please Forgive This Newbie's Ignorance, But I Need Some Help...


laurieapg
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Hello--I'm so glad this forum is here. I hope you can help me. I was given a Montblanc (or is it?) by someone who found it in a drawer and didn't want it because "he didn't like fountain pens." The nib is all yellow gold with no inlay and is labeled, starting from the point and reading toward the barrel, 4810, the Montblanc logo, 14k, MONTBLANC, 585. The cap ring reads MEISTERSTUCK-MONTBLANC-. The clip ring, though worn, seems to read W-GERMANY. I apologize for the quality of the pictures. The pen seems smaller than most Montblancs I have seen. It's lovely--but is it a Montblanc? If so, what model? Any help would be appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance--Laurieapg

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looks like a 146? does it have a dome on end that is twistable? or there is one pc barrel that twists off and exposes a cartridge?

'The Yo-Yo maneuver is very difficult to explain. It was first perfected by the well-known Chinese fighter pilot Yo-Yo Noritake. He also found it difficult to explain, being quite devoid of English.

So we left it at that. He showed us the maneuver after a sort. B*****d stole my kill.'

-Squadron Leader K. G. Holland, RAF. WWII China.

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It is a one piece barrel. The barrel twists off to expose the place where an ink cartridge would go. I have tried to use it, but no ink will flow through from the cartridge through the nib. But that's a separate issue...

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sounds like a MB 145, it may be dry u could buy cartridges and put it in there, and off u go

'The Yo-Yo maneuver is very difficult to explain. It was first perfected by the well-known Chinese fighter pilot Yo-Yo Noritake. He also found it difficult to explain, being quite devoid of English.

So we left it at that. He showed us the maneuver after a sort. B*****d stole my kill.'

-Squadron Leader K. G. Holland, RAF. WWII China.

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It is a Montblanc 144 but from the pictures it is impossible to say for sure it is authentic. The corrosion at the end of the section though is pretty typical of the real thing. Try soaking the nib and section in a glass of water overnight and tell us what it is like in the morning.

 

My Website

 

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I bought cartridges and tried it, but the ink wouldn't flow through. I will soak the nib and lower barrel section overnight and let you know what happens. Thanks, GTOZack and Jar! Next step--what would I look for to find out if it is authentic or not?

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Also, there does not seem to be a serial number anywhere. Is that significant? And what does the 585 at the very base of the nib mean?

 

Thanks again!

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Not a Montblanc expert (you'll have to look to others to verify the authenticity), but 14K and 585 are indicators of the gold content; 14K means it's 14 parts gold out of 24, and 585 means that it's 58.5% gold. I've always thought that using Karats and percentages at the same time was a bit redundant since they mean essentially the same thing, but perhaps that's just me :P

Hope it's authentic, by the way. Montblanc is one of the nicer brands, and so receiving one just like that would be quite the achievement, even if it isn't one of the better-known 146 or 149 line.

 

Also, welcome to the forum! Hope you enjoy your stay here, OP, and sorry in advance about your wallet. Don't worry, that's a standard greeting around these parts :W2FPN:

 

 

Cheers!

Kevin

 

EDIT:
And perhaps you could try taking a few sharper photos of the detailing? That might help some here identify the pen. Hope that helps.

Edited by Lyander0012

"The price of an object should not only be what you had to pay for it, but also what you've had to sacrifice in order to obtain it." - <i>The Wisdom of The Internet</i><p class='bbc_center'><center><img src="http://i59.tinypic.com/jr4g43.jpg"/></center>

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Thank you, Kevin! I actually have several fine fountain pens that I have collected over the years. Unfortunately--or perhaps fortunately!--I haven't had the money to buy as many as I would like.

 

I've actually had this pen for a while, but have been in law school and have not had the time or money to investigate it. The reason it came up now is that I have graduated, and someone kindly asked if I would like a Montblanc as a graduation gift. I thought I would try to get this one working before answering that.

 

I am afraid that as soon as I get a job, I will be spending as much as I can on both fine fountain pens (I prefer vintage ones, but that doesn't mean I'm exclusive there) and on vintage men's wristwatches--Gruen Curvexes are my favorites.

 

My favorite fountain pen was part of a set, a gorgeous little Shaeffer Tuckaway that wrote beautifully. I quit carrying it because it began to leak where the nib joined the barrel. It disappeared a long time ago--I think my ex "got it" during our divorce. Sigh.

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Also, there does not seem to be a serial number anywhere. Is that significant? And what does the 585 at the very base of the nib mean?

 

Thanks again!

Being from the West Germany era, it's normal to not have a serial number since they started putting serial numbers on some models right at the end of using the W.-Germany clips.

 

When I bought my first fountain pen new from MB I had to send it back for a nib exchange and once I got a good nib, it wouldn't write! After putting an ink cartridge in, I wet my finger and drew the nib over it. Eventually it started writing. Now if this pen was stored away with some ink left in the nib, it may need a good water soaking for a few days OR a flush with a cartridge converter (or alternate method).

I keep thinking about selling some of my pens but all that happens is I keep acquiring more!

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Two things: First of all, you're very much welcome! Secondly, there's nothing at all wrong with having two pens of the same brand, you know, even if they're the same model; that's the beauty of having different nib sizes for different occasions :P

Anyway, given that it's a C/C filler (well, mostly cartridge I suppose), you could probably benefit some from getting one of their piston filling pens. I'd go for the 146 myself, unless you have exceptionally chunky hands, haha; I tried out the 149 not too long ago, and was it massive! It felt a bit awkward for anything but short notes and scribbling, partly due to the fact that the balance is a bit to the top. Excellent balance is one reason why I don't particularly mind C/C fillers, you see, despite the minuscule ink capacity.

 

By the by, the smaller size can be easily explained by the fact that it's a vintage pen. As far as I'm aware, fountain pens were much smaller back when they were utilitarian rather than luxury items as they are today. Montblanc's also changed the sizes of their pens somewhat; if you compare a vintage 149 to a modern production one, you'd notice the latter was quite a bit larger in dimensions. Still, I've no idea about the identity of your mystery MB, but someone earlier probably got it right.

 

 

Cheers!

Kevin

"The price of an object should not only be what you had to pay for it, but also what you've had to sacrifice in order to obtain it." - <i>The Wisdom of The Internet</i><p class='bbc_center'><center><img src="http://i59.tinypic.com/jr4g43.jpg"/></center>

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Kevin, I like smaller pens, too--I find it hard to write with the bigger ones for the same reason you did. I love the slender size and shape of this one. I have a lovely Parker Duofold that I rarely use because it is so big. I will check out the 146--I have NO problem owning more than one of a beautiful line of pens!

 

Many, many thanks to all of you. I will let you know how it goes.

 

Cheers,
Laurie

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seeing that you have an empty ink cartridge, do you have have a large syringe by any chance?

you could clean the pen if you do happen to have a syringe. (I had one since I worked at an animal clinic)

take the needle syringe, fill it with COLD water and stick it through the back end of the empty ink cartridge.

insert the waterfilled ink cartridge in the pen and push the syringe to purge the water through the feed system.

repeat as needed. Don't use hot water, hot water will kill your pen.

 

OR:

 

you could buy an ink converter made specifically for the 144 series fountain pen for 10 bucks and it works the same way, it just requires a lot of twisting and takes longer. lol

But you could also use the converter to use bottled ink as well.so it has multiple uses.

I prefer the syringe method during cleaning because its quicker.

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The Montblanc 144 is the most commly faked pen.

But here's some tips to determing if a Montblanc 144 is real:

 

The nib is the main giveaway.

The nib can be either monotone or bitone. (Bitone is rhodium plated)

It should say "4810, Montblanc logo, 14K, 585" and is stamped.

 

1.) Use a magnet and stick it on the nib. if it sticks, its a fake. Magnets don't stick to solid 14k gold.

2.) The genuine nib is stamped. Check the underside of the nib, make sure its not metal, as fakes have a gold plated top and metal underside.

2.) Place the barrel in strong light, like sunlight, it should glow crimson red, its precious resin material has that charatceristic.

3.) The small gold rings on the cap barrel should be embedded in the pen and not glued on top and sticking out.

4.) The star must be dead center and have 6 points; some fakes have only 5

5.) Ink converter on older 144 series is a push-in type should have a clear colored ink window with a silver metal end with a black twister knob and is signed Montblanc on the metal end.

6.) Ink Converter on Newer 144 series is a screw-in type and should be Gold metal ended with black twister knob with dark gray ink window.

7.) If the pen comes with a box, the inside star logo must be white; a black star indicates a fake if its inside the case. However, a black star logo on a leather outside case is normal.

 

Hopefully these help. Welcome to the forum. ;)

Edited by jdpenman1990
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jdpenman1990,

 

Thanks for the tips! I don't have a syringe, but I can buy a converter.

 

Regarding your tips to tell if the pen is genuine or fake:

1. Don't have a magnet handy, but I will find one and let you know.

2. The nib is stamped, and gold on both top and bottom. When I shine a bright light through the barrel, it definitely glows a deep red.

3. The small gold rings on the cap barrel are embedded and do not stick out.

4. The star is dead center, with six points.

5, 6, and 7. I don't have a box or a converter--just the pen.

 

Based on these tests, so far, so good! I may have an actual 144, in very good shape (if I can get the nib cleared). I feel almost guilty for accepting it from the person who gave it to me...

 

Many, many thanks. I'm so glad I found this forum!

Laurie

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yes they began to stamp serial numbers 4th quarter of 1990 around the same time they changed to 'Germany'

 

afterwards around 1995ish or 1997 they added 'Pix' to the clip interior

 

The nib looked proper Two tone although,

 

some 14k nibs have 'StOD' stamp its in a circle and the t or o either has a line through it.

 

 

and this forum is CONTAGIOUS. because you will buy buy and buy great pens at discount you could find a 149 for 300 to 400 bucks here rather than paying full retail price + tax at bontique :D

 

and there is many awesome vintage pens with a decent price tag here too!

 

I LOVE this forums, i wish there is an app for iphone although

Edited by GTOZack

'The Yo-Yo maneuver is very difficult to explain. It was first perfected by the well-known Chinese fighter pilot Yo-Yo Noritake. He also found it difficult to explain, being quite devoid of English.

So we left it at that. He showed us the maneuver after a sort. B*****d stole my kill.'

-Squadron Leader K. G. Holland, RAF. WWII China.

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looks like a 146? does it have a dome on end that is twistable? or there is one pc barrel that twists off and exposes a cartridge?

The GP band next to the clip on the section is only on the 144

 

The older 144 FP.s came with monotone gold nibs. So this looks good for an earlier 144. It should work with a cartridge or a Mb converter after a thorough soaking or maybe a clean in an ultrasonic bath if you have one or know a jeweller who does.

 

I think it will need a push in converter.

Edited by Chrissy
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yes they began to stamp serial numbers 4th quarter of 1990 around the same time they changed to 'Germany'

 

afterwards around 1995ish or 1997 they added 'Pix' to the clip interior

 

The nib looked proper Two tone although,

 

some 14k nibs have 'StOD' stamp its in a circle and the t or o either has a line through it.

 

 

and this forum is CONTAGIOUS. because you will buy buy and buy great pens at discount you could find a 149 for 300 to 400 bucks here rather than paying full retail price + tax at bontique :D

 

and there is many awesome vintage pens with a decent price tag here too!

 

I LOVE this forums, i wish there is an app for iphone although

GTOZack,

Because of the poor quality of the photo, the nib may look two-tone, but it is monotone yellow gold. I have done some more digging: the catch on the clip is attached, not part of the clip. There is a plastic barrel in the cap. All the rings are inset, not sticking out from the body, except for the lettering part of the large ring at the bottom of the cap (but the sides of that large ring are inset properly.) There is no PIX on the clip, but we are guessing this pen, if genuine, was made pre-reunification, so that doesn't matter. I used a magnet on the nib--no reaction.

 

As for cleaning the nib--I soaked it overnight. When I gently wiped the nib, traces of watered down black ink showed on the cloth, and when I wrote with the point of the nip, traces of ink showed. Unfortunately, the cartridges I had were dried up. I will have to pick up some more tomorrow.

 

I did some digging online but couldn't find anything about a 144 with a monotone yellow gold nib. Did Montblanc ever make them?

 

Many, many thanks to everyone who has helped with this mystery. I love this forum, and am afraid that, like Michael Corleone, I'm getting pulled in...

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