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What Does "jinhao" Mean As A Chinese Word?



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I was discussing my pen purchases with one of my mates in the Community band at the last rehearsal (we both play Jinbao [with a b] euphoniums). He was wondering what the word "Jinhao" means. "Hao" means "good" with one of the four tones, but it might have different meanings with other tones.

 

Does anyone know? And care to share their knowledge?

 

 

Until you ink a pen, it is merely a pretty stick. --UK Mike

 

My arsenal, in order of acquisition: Sailor 21 Pocket Pen M, Cross Solo M, Online Calligraphy, Monteverde Invincia F, Hero 359 M, Jinhao X450 M, Levenger True Writer M, Jinhao 159 M, Platinum Balance F, TWSBI Classic 1.1 stub, Platinum Preppy 0.3 F, 7 Pilot Varsity M disposables refillables, Speedball penholder, TWSBI 580 USA EF, Pilot MR, Noodler's Ahab 1.1 stub, another Preppy 0.3, Preppy EF 0.2, ASA Sniper F, Click Majestic F, Kaweco Sport M, Pilot Prera F, Baoer 79 M (fake Starwalker), Hero 616 M (fake Parker), Jinhao X750 Shimmering Sands M . . .

31 and counting :D

 

DaveBj

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"Gold Number" according to Wikipedia, first hit after Googling "Jin Hao translate"

 

 

D.ick

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disillusion

You guys are talking about homonyms here.

 

Jinhao could mean golden heroic person or a spendthrift with a lot of gold.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. - Richard Feynman

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superglueshoe

jin = gold

hao = luxurious, dignity, pride, heroic person

(read the characters off the jinhao website)

together roughly translates to golden luxury. Or golden dignity..or golden heroic person as disillusion suggested. the problem is the "Hao" they used have multiple meanings haha

Edited by superglueshoe
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Actually, 金 means gold while 豪 means fortune or heroic.

But since a Chinese character can stand for a lot of meanings,

you can only explain "Jinhao" in an abstract way.

It is a tradition for naming a brand by combining multiple positive characters.

Chinese is my native language.

Edited by fasthall
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金豪.

 

The meaning is probably what the posters above suggest.

 

But looking at it as a separate words, as nouns and not adjectives:

金 - Gold

豪 - Oyster

 

So 金豪 means Golden Oyster? :P

 

(Chinese is my mother tongue too)

My version of the guide for the Pilot Varsity Nib transplantation to the Platinum Preppy

DIY Retractable Fountain Pen (Couldn't get it to work, now refilling Schmidt 888 M refills with FP inks in a Pilot G2 Limited, the ceramic roller tip is as smooth as a Firm FP steel nib, Poor Man's VP I guess)

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Thanks, y'all :D

Until you ink a pen, it is merely a pretty stick. --UK Mike

 

My arsenal, in order of acquisition: Sailor 21 Pocket Pen M, Cross Solo M, Online Calligraphy, Monteverde Invincia F, Hero 359 M, Jinhao X450 M, Levenger True Writer M, Jinhao 159 M, Platinum Balance F, TWSBI Classic 1.1 stub, Platinum Preppy 0.3 F, 7 Pilot Varsity M disposables refillables, Speedball penholder, TWSBI 580 USA EF, Pilot MR, Noodler's Ahab 1.1 stub, another Preppy 0.3, Preppy EF 0.2, ASA Sniper F, Click Majestic F, Kaweco Sport M, Pilot Prera F, Baoer 79 M (fake Starwalker), Hero 616 M (fake Parker), Jinhao X750 Shimmering Sands M . . .

31 and counting :D

 

DaveBj

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金豪.

 

The meaning is probably what the posters above suggest.

 

But looking at it as a separate words, as nouns and not adjectives:

金 - Gold

豪 - Oyster

 

So 金豪 means Golden Oyster? :P

 

(Chinese is my mother tongue too)

 

And people are still looking for that damn pearl... lol :D

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金豪.

 

The meaning is probably what the posters above suggest.

 

But looking at it as a separate words, as nouns and not adjectives:

金 - Gold

豪 - Oyster

 

So 金豪 means Golden Oyster? :P

 

(Chinese is my mother tongue too)

 

豪 cannot possibly be "oyster" without a radical making it 蠔 .

No, I am not going to list my pens here.

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My bad, oyster is the one with the bug character in front. >__<

 

Yup, Seele is right about

Golden Chivalry. :)

 

On a side note, they do have the balls to make clones. Though they have wonderful designs too :D

My version of the guide for the Pilot Varsity Nib transplantation to the Platinum Preppy

DIY Retractable Fountain Pen (Couldn't get it to work, now refilling Schmidt 888 M refills with FP inks in a Pilot G2 Limited, the ceramic roller tip is as smooth as a Firm FP steel nib, Poor Man's VP I guess)

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Golden Luxury would be the most accurate translation.

Careful when buying a bird.. you'll end up with a flock before you know it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Me, I'll translate it into "Gold Ambition".

The "hao 豪" also has a meaning of "great ambition". If you take a look at Jinhao's logo, it's a Chinese chariot which, I believe, indicates the chariot Confucius used to ride when he traveled around China (about 2500 years ago).

Therefore I would say that Jinhao could possibly mean a gold (glorious) ambition.

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  • 2 months later...

JinHao simply means good pen:

 

1. Jin means gold, as a Chinese tradition, expensive or valuable things are always referred as gold.

for example, someone is trying to sell you a cheap table at $1000 price tag. you fight back:

"Are you selling a gold table? it's just a wood table!".

 

2. Hao in old Chinese means animal hair used to make traditional Chinese brush pen. In modern Chinese

this word also means a writing instrument, especially a traditional Chinese brush pen.

 

Sadly, even native Chinese speakers here didn't even know that Hao here means animal hair, and ended up

with the wrong answers.

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豪 has been used for 毫 before, as in 商君書·弱民:「今離婁見秋豪之末,不能以明目易人。」 Could mean "golden hair." Or "metal hair." Y'know...like fountain pens?

Renzhe

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JinHao simply means good pen:

 

1. Jin means gold, as a Chinese tradition, expensive or valuable things are always referred as gold.

for example, someone is trying to sell you a cheap table at $1000 price tag. you fight back:

"Are you selling a gold table? it's just a wood table!".

 

2. Hao in old Chinese means animal hair used to make traditional Chinese brush pen. In modern Chinese

this word also means a writing instrument, especially a traditional Chinese brush pen.

 

Sadly, even native Chinese speakers here didn't even know that Hao here means animal hair, and ended up

with the wrong answers.

 

It is true that in ancient times 豪 =毫 in some contexts, but it is not ancient times any more.

Edited by posthuman1
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  • 9 months later...

JinHao simply means good pen:

 

1. Jin means gold, as a Chinese tradition, expensive or valuable things are always referred as gold.

for example, someone is trying to sell you a cheap table at $1000 price tag. you fight back:

"Are you selling a gold table? it's just a wood table!".

 

2. Hao in old Chinese means animal hair used to make traditional Chinese brush pen. In modern Chinese

this word also means a writing instrument, especially a traditional Chinese brush pen.

 

Sadly, even native Chinese speakers here didn't even know that Hao here means animal hair, and ended up

with the wrong answers.

As a Chinese, I must thank you for your edification.

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richardandtracy

Thinking about it, it would surprise me if the double meaning wasn't deliberate. If you could have a word that meant 'Luxurious Gold' and 'Valuable Brush Pen' at the same time depending on context, then any marketing guru would almost force you to use it, wouldn't they?

 

Regards,

 

Richard.

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And the Chinese language is fantastic at being able to have multiple meanings, puns and inferences from just a few characters. Probably the most ubiquitous, at least at a certain time of year, is the posting of the character for luck, Fu, upside down. When you speak the sentence, "your "Fu" is upside down", it sounds exactly like the words "Your luck has arrived." It's a visual, verbal pun using only one character.

 

I'm with richardandtracy. The answer, I would guess, would be both meanings.

 

At one time my Classical Chinese was better than my modern, and modern Chinese has nothing on the language tricks played using Classical Chinese, which can be much more concise and much less precise. This is what allows for whole books to be written on the many meanings of a short passage in Classical Chinese.

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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