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Inky T O D - What Are Dry Inks?


amberleadavis

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When I first started on FPN, I tried to describe the troubles I was having with my pens clogging. Turns out the inks I was drawn to, were sort of "dry" inks and wet inks worked better in my pens.

 

So, what exactly is a Dry ink? And what are some examples. I've posted another TOD for Wet Inks.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My first suggestion is an ink that is a great performer, but it was the first time I understood a "Dry Ink".

 

R&K Scabiosa

 

http://sheismylawyer.com/She_Thinks_In_Ink/Ink_Companies/RK/slides/RandK_Scabiosa.jpg

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sheaffer ink's. These inks are quite effective at telling you how smooth a pen really is as if it is buttery smooth with a sheaffer ink it is a very good pen.

 

Dry ink = High Viscosity

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Sheaffer ink's. These inks are quite effective at telling you how smooth a pen really is as if it is buttery smooth with a sheaffer ink it is a very good pen.

 

Dry ink = High Viscosity

 

Hey, you changed your avatar.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Are dry inks more scratchy than wet inks?

''You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes''. A A Milne

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I have a bottle of Wirt blue-black dating from around the first decade of the last century. That is some seriously dry ink in that bottle.

 

If you want to talk about liquid ink, Parker Quink Black. Only works in my wettest writers.

Dave Campbell
Retired Science Teacher and Active Pen Addict
Every day is a chance to reduce my level of ignorance.

fpn_1425200643__fpn_1425160066__super_pi

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Hey, you changed your avatar.

 

I was finding people thought I was a bit of a Parker fan boy to with the previous avatar. So until I have time I have time to come up with something a bit more creative I'll use the cap of my one of my favourite pens for a while.

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Are dry inks more scratchy than wet inks?

 

That's how I think of them.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pelikan 4001 Blue Black

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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I think I understand what a dry ink is but can't get a handle on "lubricated" inks. I'll have a look at your other post in a mo.

 

My dry inks.

Scabiosa - but it's lovely

ESSRI - also lovely.

Pelikan 4001 Blue Black - never liked it.

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Pretty much any of the iron gall inks I've tried fall into the "dry" category. Also, Diamine Damson, and I'm thinking Diamine Presidential Blue (although in the latter case it might just be that it's an ink sort of in the middle of the range, just in a very dry pen).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

edited for typos

Edited by inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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Thanks for posing the question, though I think you already know the answer, Ink Goddess that you are.

 

When I first started looking at the posts on FPN I'd see people talking about "dry ink" and "wet ink", as well as pens, and I really didn't know what they were talking about. I only have limited experience with inks and a few pens, but compared to the other inks I have, the DeAtramentis Pigeon Blue is a dry ink. All my other inks in that Lamy 2000 have flowed very easily, but with the Pigeon Blue it seems like I have to slow down my writing for it to keep up, and my fast strokes are thinner than with other inks to some extent.

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I think I understand what a dry ink is but can't get a handle on "lubricated" inks.

Same, what is "wet" vs what is "lubricated"?

 

 

Dry ink = High Viscosity

If I add a surfactant to a dry ink, can I make a wet ink? Or is that where Viscosity =/= Surface Tension comes into play?

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Colonial Williamsburg Ink

 

http://www.williamsburgmarketplace.com/wcsstore/wmarket/images//catalog_images/hero_shot/1223981_3Q05_hs.jpg

 

Sorry, not really helping, but couldn't resist...

fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif




“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.


And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”


Granny Aching

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I think the correlation between viscosity and wetness isnt always hard and fast. Pelikan inks seem lower viscosity to me but are dry. I like DCwaites explanation of surface tension. The higher it is, the less eager it is to come from your pen and onto the page, thus giving you a dry Ink.

Oh. And lamy black and pelikan 4001 :)

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Does anyone else find that red inks tend to be drier than other colors?

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Does anyone else find that red inks tend to be drier than other colors?

I haven't noticed that, but I steer towards impure reds: pink-reds, orange-reds, dark reds. That might make a difference. The only red-red I have that I love is Diamine Matador.

 

I would like to offer up Diamine Macassar. Color's fine, but it writes so incredibly dry that you'd think it was an iron gall. :(

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It 'seems' that dryer inks shade better, not getting swamped by ink flow.

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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I have wondered about wet and dry inks since I started using fp's in Feb. I see alot of examples here but not a really good explanation, except that that they're 'scratchier.' Can someone please explain to a 3 month old in simple terms? How can you tell if it's your pen and not the ink? I'm still lost. :mellow:

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