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Wooden Quartet Of Japanese Pens


cbbp
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Ohh...that's a beauty! Love the contrast between the dark wood and the gold...

:puddle:

And it feels better than it looks!

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Ohh...that's a beauty! Love the contrast between the dark wood and the gold...

:puddle:

 

+1

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Update: I was right; the cocobolo Hakase used to be owned by Sblakers. Hope he doesn't mind me mentioning it. :lol: Thank you!

 

This pen has a fine nib tuned to write very wetly, so the line it puts down is more like a Japanese medium-broad line. Yamamoto-san's craftsmanship on this pen is just amazing. The cap and barrel are crafted from a single scantling (read: wood blank) and the wood grain lines up nicely when the pen is capped.

 

Here's a photo I just took of my cocobolo Hakase pen.

 

14185803426_358b3b4235_b.jpg

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Here's a photo I just took of my cocobolo Hakase pen.

 

14185803426_358b3b4235_b.jpg

 

This might be a dumb question but does the taper at the end mean the pen is meant to be posted?

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This might be a dumb question but does the taper at the end mean the pen is meant to be posted?

 

Yes, you are right. Unposted, the pen has the same length of an unposted Pelikan M800. The balance is perfect posted or unposted.

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These wooden pens look delightful, but if I lived in a hot/dry climate would I need to worry about the possibility of them cracking?

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If properly cured I don't think that cracking would be an issue with wooden pens, similar to wood guitars which are of course even more sensitive to transitions between different climates. Of course one shouldn't abuse wooden pens by leaving them for hours and hours in the heat.

 

A little off-topic here (apologies to cbbp), but I just wrote a review of the cocobolo Hakase pen if you guys are interested.

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These wooden pens look delightful, but if I lived in a hot/dry climate would I need to worry about the possibility of them cracking?

 

As shuuemura says, it shouldn't be an issue, but you would probably want to keep an eye on the wood just to be sure. FWIW, of my wooden pens, I've only had a crack develop in one of them (Pilot Custom Grandee), but it was easily fixed by a repair person. (Dr. Goretex, who's also on FPN) My suspicion is that the crack wasn't due to the heat/humidity/cold/dryness as much as it was the width of the wood at that point (very thin) and the pressure I put on the pen while writing. FWIW, my Platinum Yakusugi has gone through 2 Montreal winters (the last one being pretty brutal) but is none the worse for wear...

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If properly cured I don't think that cracking would be an issue with wooden pens, similar to wood guitars which are of course even more sensitive to transitions between different climates. Of course one shouldn't abuse wooden pens by leaving them for hours and hours in the heat.

 

A little off-topic here (apologies to cbbp), but I just wrote a review of the cocobolo Hakase pen if you guys are interested.

 

Nice review, and certainly not off topic! Happy to read about more wooden pens from Japan.

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The two central are made of Cocobolo and Ebony. Recently I am using both quite a lot, with care of course, but no sign of wear are visible so far.

Q.

post-49425-0-10108000-1401184002_thumb.jpg

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Is that a quartet of Hakase pens?! Beautiful collection!

 

I know the 3 from the left are Hakase...not sure about the blue/white one on the end, but it's a beautiful pen nonetheless.

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All of them are Hakase, from left:

Green celluloid with buffalo horn inserts in the cap and barrel (top and bottom).

Cocobolo wood with classic torpedo shape.

Ebony wood with gold ring in the barrel and small gold ring in the grip

Blue celluloid with part of the barrel made of buffalo horn with gold ring and clip.

All with fine nibs.

Q.

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Ebony wood with gold ring in the barrel and small gold ring in the grip

 

 

I'd love to see that gold ring in the grip section :)

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