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Making My Own Stationary


frolic
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I'd like to make my own stationary in hopes that having some decent paper will encourage me to write more correspondence. If it works for journaling it will probably work for correspondence.

 

So I need two key things—paper and a template. I have a decent color ink jet printer. I plan on using a heavier weight printer paper and cutting in in half to make, well whatever the name is for half a sheet of standard 8.5 and 11 paper.

 

I want a simple but elegant design on the stationary itself. I don't have a permanent address right now so the only personalization I want is my name.

 

What kinds of printer paper do you all use for letter writing and has anyone made their own stationary and have any tips?

 

Also as an aside are there any office store level envelopes that are better than others for FPs?

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That seem like a lot of trouble.

 

Follow: http://www.crane.com/ for one

 

You want half sheets

 

Don't know where you live, but plenty of shops can customize it for you. (or you can do it yourself)

Edited by Charles Rice
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It definitely is a bit of a project but it sounded like fun to me.

 

I actually have some Crane I use for very formal writing. Crane is rather expensive for my needs right now and even more so to customize. I like the idea of something I can customize in small batches and eventually when I find or design something I can commit to and have the money I can get it professionally done on high quality paper. For now though I'd like the ability to make small runs and play around with designs.

 

If I were to buy "nice" stationary for I'd probably add on some to my next Goulet order and do without customization, so I'll also add on another question. What are peoples opinions on their offerings?

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I definitely make my own stationery. I have tons of pen pals, and I like to keep the stationery interesting or else all my long letters can become quite a bore for my readers! :P

 

I used a lined template I printed off online templates, and then I inserted images into them. Sometimes I used a template in Microsoft Word, sometimes I made a paper template that I then photocopied. It depends on the quality of the image. I also do some modification in MS Paint. If you're rich or have access somehow to Adobe Creative Suites, I know a lot of people use that to create a wide array of paper goods.

 

I use mainly Tomoe River paper and laid paper similar to G. Lalo, depending how I'm feeling. It's really fun to make your own stationery. You can do whatever you like, and it's fun to personalize it! I love putting a mix of quotes from my favourite movies/music/books and images that go with it.

 

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af97/Saskia_Madding/temp3_zpsc55384d3.jpg

 

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af97/Saskia_Madding/temp4_zpsbf7934a8.jpg

 

 

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af97/Saskia_Madding/temp1_zpsde6d555d.jpg

 

 

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af97/Saskia_Madding/temp2_zps20f05bc3.jpg

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I love your templates! The combination of art and quotation is just the rout I'm looking to go down.

 

How do you find such a light weight paper like Tomoe River goes through a printer?

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Nice stuff, saskia. But for me, I'd have to turn in my 'man card' if I sent out stuff that fancy. :lol:

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With great difficulty. I have to hand feed it, sheet by sheet. And on the TR box, it says not to put it through a printer because it will gum it up and get caught. I'm lucky - the high tech photocopier at my office has a special section for "special" paper, both thick and thin. If I tell it to expect thin paper it mostly goes okay. I'd say I ruin about one in every 6 pages. The "ruined" paper only goes halfway through the printing process and the ink never sets, so when it comes out it's a bit crumpled and I have to wipe it off with a towel or something. I usually end up using those sheets as test pages for ink instead.

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I use all kinds of stationery that was made for computer printers (8.5" x 11"). Some is marginal, some is fantastic.

 

Some time back a wax seal was made for me by Mustom (Red Comma), and later I thought about the artwork I submitted. Reduced to a smaller size it's nice at the top of blank paper. It's fun to have them match.

 

With a good word processor, you might make an elegant initials letterhead or a name/address one.

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I think this will be a fun project. I have both Word and Pages on my Macbook. I might even be able to ask my mom who does graphic design for some help.

 

The trickiest part might be find the good quality affordable paper that will run through the printer smoothly.

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Most of my stationery comes from my ink jet printer. I purchased a ream of Astroparche paper from Wausau Paper Co. from the local print shop and make my own. The Astroparche is a nice off white paper with an appealing surface and is fountain pen friendly. I found a line template and toned it down so that instead of black lines they are gray and hardly noticeable but still there. I use my name and some of my photos at the top or some line art. I print the lines on both sides and have additional sheets with no name just lines on both sides for when I write a multiple page letter. I use mine 81/2 X 11 but there would be no reason you couldn't cut the sheets in half and orient the lines and art the other way.

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I say you make your own. I did that for a while a couple years back and it was great fun (and nice play money). :)

 

http://coffeegrinderpress.wordpress.com/552-2/custom-letterhead/

Very nice!

 

I've been trying to come up with a design for my own letterhead, but had no inspiration. I got as far as an address frame and then got stuck.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mysight/13824758344/

Edited by Inkysloth

Instagram @inkysloth

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Just in case anyone cares at this point, I think what you're looking at is Monarch size. Or close to it.....

Moshe ben David

 

"Behold, He who watches over Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps!"

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Why not fold your own envelopes, using whichever paper you choose for the writing stock ? Here's how I do it.

 

Cut a 6 x 4-/14 inch rectangle from heavy card stock, such as a department store gift box. This is the folding template.

 

1. Trim the full sheet of paper to an 8-1/2 inch square, and mark the center of the square with a light pencil mark.

2. Fold two diagonal corners to the center, using the template. It's okay, if the corners fall short of the center mark,

. . as long as they are equally short of the mark.

3. Of the remaining two corners of paper, fold one up around the template, and the other down, around the template..

Recognize it ? This is your envelope.

4. Open the sheet to remove the template, and scissor-snip away the small triangles that make the folds too thick.

5. Refold, as before, omitting the template. Strategically apply glue for assembly. Fits the "half-sheets".

 

Suggestions:

Between step 2 and step 3, slide the template about a quarter inch.

Custom trim for aesthetics.

The Post Office processes by high-speed automation, so I recommend minimum 24# paper stock.

 

Write with joy.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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Made my own stationary for years. Prefer a Laser Printer, but have used inkjet as well. Lots of templates. If I use lines, prefer them to be lighter in color.

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