Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Inky Thought Of The Day - (Inky T O D) - What Is A Serious Pen?


amberleadavis
 Share

Recommended Posts

So, because we all have those Inky Thoughts.... And in the spirit of Pinky and the Brain ...

 

 

What is a serious pen?

 

I agree my TWSBI with Akkerman Orange is not the height of seriousness when I arrive at court. Also, dcpritch's beautiful fuchsia celluloid flex pen is stunning - awesome and has panache, but it lacks gravitas. That being said, I have business cards with flowers - so I'm not dissing the stunning visuals. I'm just not sure that even expensive skeleton pens have enough umpff to be considered serious. I'll admit, when I go to court, I take the MB Starwalker or the Vintage MB Ballpoint.

 

I suspect that the fountain pen, no matter how expensive, beautiful or tasteful, is just too flashy or different to be serious.

 

What do you think of when you want to project an aura of serious .... what is a serious pen?

 

 

 

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar



Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 33
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Bo Bo Olson

    2

  • Sandy1

    3

  • amberleadavis

    4

  • Newjelan

    2

just any fountain pen will suffice and I have more style and class than a ballpoint person - most of the time that's a cheap company's ballpoint with huge advertising, even at court.

 

If I really cared about that question there are enough plain black pens in my desk... :-)

 

Oh, btw: at court it depends which role I have to play; sometimes it could pay to be the plain, common man from the street who has to ask for a pen... :-)

Greetings,

Michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to admit that in my world "seriousness" is not important...as no one judges me by my appearance, but if I had to choose a pen for a serious or somber occasion and it could be a fountain pen then something in Black with chrome or silver tasteful accents and an identifiable but subtle logo (like the MB Star or the classic Pelikan clip) would be my choice. Personally from my collection a M1000 or a MB 149 would be my most likely choices or the large Sailor Models in Black (like a KOP or maybe a Pilot 845). However I tend to gravitate towards the brightly colored and people have grown to expect that from me so I use those much more often. If you are stuck with needing a BP/Rollerball a Pelikan 800-1000 series would be my choice as there is no MB 149 rollerball/ballpoint. If you want slightly more exotic...perhaps a darkly colored Nakaya?

This post contains 100% recycled electrons

http://i952.photobucket.com/albums/ae8/Catriker/Pen%20Pics/SmallCzarNikolai.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any plain dark colored pen is serious. Black is a power color, (serious words) blue is more business-like; also serious, but I always think more business related. A dark red wouldn't be bad also, but one would have to be careful as to tone. A dull pewter type silver grey would not be bad either, also serious, but not as stern as black.

 

I think I read too many dress for success books, and transfer the color to FP's, LOL.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As an academic I think we are allowed a little more freedom. An MB or Sailor Torpedo in black, my colleague uses a waterman carene, I have used a Pelikan M400 in green. I think a degree of understatement is important, but I would go to something sterling silver, not to a gold coloured pen... maybe not chrome either.

 

Current pens at work:

Pilot custom 823 x2 (tobacco and clear demo)

Montblanc 1912

Sheaffer Touchdown Imperial (sterling silver)

For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love. -Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is serious and then there is Serious. For me and who I am: plain, understated is the way to go. And serious might not apply so much for me.

 

But if I was someone who held sway over the world economy and with a single stroke of the pen could wipe out trillions of dollars in wealth, then I'd want a very serious pen with a very serious ink. A ballpoint simply would not be up to the task. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guess it depends on your practice. if you do bankruptcy, might be a good idea to walk in with a Bic Clic to show your client you are right there with them! On the other hand, if you are high profile criminal attorney, perhaps a MB 149 is in order. And if you're a real estate closing attorney specializing in million dollar mansions, then pull out any $2,500 - $5,000 fountain pen for everyone to sign their nom de plume. Oh and leave it with them when they are done! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been searching for just such a pen for a while. I have an affinity for demonstrators and brightly colored pens. I have a bunch of Lamy Safaris/Al-Stars, a bunch of bright yellow and orange pens, etc. For what I do normally, that's not a problem. But, there are times I need to appear more... "sophisticated" I guess, for lack of a better term.

I'm leaning towards a Pelikan 600/605. It's colorful enough that it holds my interest, yet subdued enough that it's not "in your face".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

In very generic terms, I'd say a well-polished Black pen with an open nib would be serious, and the less adornment the better. e.g. Parker England Duofold Senior.

 

At the office a Parker Sonnet Flighter is my daily writer, and in the field I use primarily a rotring 600. I've thought those 'serious' enough for any occasion.

 

If I were to wear my Hanna Montana bangles to a Big Cheese meeting, the Pink Safari might tag along, but that seems likely only in a parallel universe. :rolleyes:

 

Bye,

S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Around here, people would think my Pilot 79g is a serious pen.

 

LOL! :lol:

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with others,

In general, black with gold, chrome or black trim.

Next in line: a DARK color such as dark blue, dark green, dark red.

In my environment,

 

Flighter, brushed stainless steel finish, for durability.

 

Unless you have someone that can recognize the pens, I do not think the brand makes very much difference. From across the table, my $4 Baoer 388 looks like my $100 Parker Sonnet. And my $15 Pilot Metro might look like a MB (if they don't notice the missing white "splat").

 

For some people, the size (diameter) conveys seriousness.

For me it is just too FAT

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first pen in my modest collection that I thought of was my black Parker 51 with the standard brushed chrome cap. If that isn't serious enough, then I probably don't belong there!

Adam

Dayton, OH

It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings.

-- Prov 25:2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Black and Gold....the serious Germans made the colorful pens for export and kept the serious pens at home.

If some idiot used a pen with color out side a Pelikan tortoise or green stripped....he got fired. There was something wrong with him...frivolous...he was not serious enough. He couldn't be trusted...he was odd....thought for him self.....thinking is dangerous in subordinates.

 

Nope...no MB's....that is putting on the dog. :D

 

So black and gold non-MB...may I suggest the classiest black and gold pen of all? A sleek Geha 725 with inlaid nib, rolled gold trim...two gold disks on each end. and or Pelikan tortoise or green stripped; but not one of those bright red stripped ones or the pretty 600's....

 

Which explains why I said 3 years ago...no more black and gold pens...and 2/3s of what I've bought vintage of course are black and gold, along with $$$.

Vintage pens with color cost 1/2 more than black and gold. :crybaby:

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure if I really get the point or not but for me personally -- as well as that which I have gathered from others -- is that alone the "looks" and w/a "feelings" of an M800 /M1000 or a 146/149 definitely shows a great tendency towards seriousness.

 

Mike

Life is too short to drink bad wine (Goethe)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the above suggestion of the Pilot 845 is spot on. Serious, classy, refined, understated - all at once.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BTW, Sandy - I plagiarized the word "gravitas" from your reviews.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar



Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1+ to all the above. Of the pens I own the most "serious" would be any Parker "51" -Black Vac, Cedar Blue Vac, the Gray Vac maybe even the Plum Aero. My Sheaffer Snorkels are more colorful but the Burgundy could pull it off, that Triumph nib is powerful.

 

Most of my modern pens are inexpensive but the Pilot Namiki Falcon in basic Black is such a smooth graceful writer it would win any argument.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Each of these pens has gone with me to various court appearances .... The most expensive is the Cartier which is slim and sophisticated, but I don't think it has the heft or imposing looks of a heavy MB. For that matter, with small hands the big pens can look disproportionately large.

 

http://sheismylawyer.com/She_Thinks_In_Ink/Inked_Today/slides/2013-Ink_843.jpg

 

Here's my going to court pen.

 

http://sheismylawyer.com/She_Thinks_In_Ink/2014-Inklings/slides/2014-Ink_058c.jpg

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar



Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to meet with clients or go to court or other serious event with a serious vintage pen just as much as a serious modern pen. I like taking a big Oversize flattop, a 1930s Italian celluloid or a vintage German pen as much as I do any modern pen. The main things I think about is to be sure it doesn't leak, that it starts up easy, and that I don't run out of ink!

How small of all that human hearts endure,
That part which laws or kings can cause or cure.

— Samuel Johnson

 

Instagram: dcpritch

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...