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Gama "two-Tone" (Duofold Type)



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13675782165_2d56483be2_c.jpg

 

1. Appearance & Design = 7

  • To me, this pen looks like an homage to the Parker Duofold, but on a minimal scale. Gama did not do straight line knurling on the cap or bands at the tail of the pen, like the Duofolds have. Gama also used a generic big-ball clip, similar to a Pilot clip. It's derivative and economic, but still classic.
  • The material is a beautiful beige/black mottled ebonite, not as glossy as acrylic but very glossy by ebonite standards. The seams between the different pieces are very smooth, although the hardware (clip and cap bands) leave something to be desired.
  • The Gama name is engraved on the side of the barrel. The engraving does not appear to be from a laser, but a machine, and it is subtle but well done.
  • It came with a generic two-tone nib, which I replaced with a Knox two-tone nib and a later overfeed modification. The overfeed detracts from the aesthetic, but I'm leaving it in place because it is practical.
  • I deduct 3 points for the sloppy cap bands and clip attachment. If those could have been symmetrical and flush like the other joints on the pen, I think the appearance would have been a perfect ten.

2. Construction & Quality = 8

  • The execution of the cap bands is sloppy, with one side being too deeply inset, while the other side sticks out quite a bit. The attachment of the clip piece is also asymmetrical.
  • Capacity seems to be a hair over 3mL.
  • With some eyedroppers the section can fit too tightly, but Gama made this pen just right. As a result, I don't have any trouble removing the section to fill the barrel, and there is no danger of leakage.
  • The ebonite is of very good quality, and has held its luster very well over the first month or so of my usage. The gold coloring on the clip will eventually wear off, but it seems to be holding up pretty well for now.
  • Threading seems to be good--only 1 to 1.5 turns to remove the cap. However, I have noticed the cap will go on slightly crooked unless I leave it 1/8 turn looser than its tightest position.
  • I already deducted points for the sloppy cap band and clip attachment.
  • The section shape is comfortable and well proportioned, and the threads do not bother me when gripping the pen.
  • I deduct two points for the crookedness when the cap is closed.

3. Weight & Dimensions = 10

  • I don't have a digital scale, but I'd say the weight/size is comparable to a Ranga Model 3 or a TWSBI Vac 700. It's a large pen with a medium weight--not as nimble as a Parker 45, but there's no filling mechanism so it's fairly light and balanced toward the nib.
  • Dimensions:
    • Length capped: 145 mm
    • Length of cap: 67 mm
    • Length uncapped: 132 mm
    • Section at narrowest: 11 mm
    • Section near barrel: 13 mm
    • Body at widest: 14 mm
  • Balance is very good. This pen could post, but I don't think it's necessary. Unposted, this could be a very good session writer.
  • No points deducted here.

4. Nib & Performance = 8

  • The original nib wasn't bad. It was a generic two-tone steel fine nib with very good flow. It was a little scratchy, but smoothed out with only a couple minutes of tine adjustment and circles on my buff stick.
  • I've become a medium and broad nib convert, so I ordered a Knox B steel nib (size K35, comparable to a #6) from xfountainpens.com (no affiliation) and was able to do a very easy swap because the feed is somewhat loose-fitting in the section. I think this helps the ink flow, but it also means I didn't have to get the hair dryer to get the new nib in place. I was even able to squeeze an overfeed in there with some effort.
  • Flow is 10/10. It's a firehose. I'm using Diamine Ancient Copper in this pen because the saturation looks so good--almost as dark as oxblood red.
  • The Knox nib was very smooth when I received it, but I had some baby bottom issues. I had to press the nib somewhat firmly on the first stroke to get the ink flowing, and had lots of skipping due to the nib (remember, the flow was more than adequate). Baby bottom is hard to fix, but I think I've just about banished it. The Knox B is stubbish and a little springy, making this a very pleasurable session writer.
  • I deduct two points for a scratchy nib out of the box, but I won't deduct any more because the fit of the feed and rate of flow are remarkably good.

5. Filling System & Maintenance = 9

  • There's no better scenario than a generously flowing pen with a generously sized reservoir. This one holds about 3 mL and fills as an eyedropper.
  • I deduct one point for the eyedropper filling because there is no ink window, and it can be a little messy.
  • However, this pen deserves a solid nine because an ED requires almost no maintenance and delivers a lot of ink. I use an ink syringe for better control when filling, and I think I can fill it just as fast as a piston filler.

6. Cost & Value = 10

  • I received this from a friend here on FPN, and "free" is always the best price. I think these go for around $50-70 on eBay. Edit: At about $23 on asapens.in (no affiliation) this is a steal. The equivalent Ranga is closer to $40, but I think the Gama has a nicer finish. This ebonite holds its gloss very well, and it's nice to have some accent hardware (even if they're attached somewhat askew) and a clean engraving of the manufacturer name.
  • The machining is very good. Fit of threads is also better than the Ranga Model 3 pens I've handled, so I think that's worth the extra cost. But, the selling point for me is the flow. Gama's feed manufacture is simple, but well executed. Again, the attachment of the hardware is somewhat sloppy, but it's not a deal breaker, in my view.
  • This is a pen that will hold up well because of negligible maintenance, provides a very good experience for long session writing (size, balance, medium weight, and ebonite material), and can be fitted with any #6 nib to suit your tastes.

7. Conclusion = 52/60

  • Overall, I feel this is a very enjoyable pen to use and I really did not expect it to be such a wet writer. At $70, would I buy this pen? Yes--entirely because of the wet feed. Did I get lucky? I don't know. Maybe other Gama customers will weigh in on how the flow and setup was on their pens. To me, this particular pen is very worthwhile in the sub-$100 category. Edit: Available from asapens.in for $23 under other names. Very good value.
  • I'll bring it with me to the upcoming pen show. If you'd like to test it out, just send me a message or find me in the crowd.
  • If you're looking for a large session writer that won't fatigue your hand, and if you have even a tiny bit of ingenuity when it comes to adjusting or replacing a nib, this is worth a look.

 

 

The following photos were taken with my iPhone 5c, using HDR mode. For the closeup shots, I affixed a loupe, which gives a slight fisheye effect, but provides the best level of detail.

 

 

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What I received from my friend: Gama two-tone, Ratnamson no. 32, and Oliver 81. A very kind gift. :)

 

12273449124_3b28362dab_c.jpg

The original nib. Not much to look at, but it was okay.

 

13675782335_b4aa0c207f_c.jpg

Buddy shot with the Ratnamson no. 32. Note the difference between the two ebonite samples. The Gama is swirled with a rich black, and shows more depth. Learn more about my R32 project, including some discussion of the overfeed modification, here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/261306-ratnamson-no-32-with-kaweco-sport-nibfeed/

 

13676125524_919e382a38_c.jpg

Beautiful material.

 

13675786785_7047f2f365_c.jpgAnother view of the ebonite.

 

13675786205_31b955618a_c.jpg

Where the threads meet the section. Note how the threads are smoothed toward the body.

 

13676129554_c7fc642d33_c.jpg

The section is not concave, that's just an effect of looking through the loupe. Note the size of the step at the end of the grip, which provides a comfortable and secure hold.

 

13676129764_4aa1199b61_c.jpg

My overfeed isn't pretty, but it fits very well. You can see how the DAC has oxidized around the overfeed. The nib underneath is quite pretty, with a little lion and everything, so I'm sorry you don't get to see it.

 

13675829433_17d674402f_c.jpg

Note the chamfer at the opening to the section. This makes it super easy to fit the feed in place. The ebonite feed is handmade, and somewhat crude, but well executed.

 

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Here you can see how flush the endpiece was finished.

 

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Another view of the endpiece. That tiny gap where you see the glue is impossible for me to feel with my fingernail. I didn't even see it until I looked at the pictures.

 

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The Gama name engraved on the barrel. Perhaps carved by a CNC machine? Doesn't look laser-etched. I kind of like it.

 

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The ball is formed from folded steel--very shiny.

 

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This is the side of the cap bands that is too deeply inset.

 

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The other side of the cap, where the bands are not inset deeply enough and do not match each other.

 

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Here you can see the side of the clip attachment ring that sticks out from the finial slightly.

 

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And here, the side of the clip attachment that is too far in. Other manufacturers create a seat so this isn't visible, but Gama took a shortcut on this part. It ruins an otherwise flawlessly flush finish on the rest of the pen.

 

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Edited by tomgartin

- - -

 

Currently trying to sell a Pelikan M400 White Tortoise. PM if you're interested. :)

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Thanks for the review. Saw it listed on the asapens.in site They have listed it by name of "Gama Forever" with four variants. Just purchased one (the light brown variant).

I put my savings to test

Lamy & Pilot FPs the Best

No more I even think of the rest

(Preference Fine and Extra Fine Nibs)

Pen is meant for writing - not for looking :-)

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Scribblesoften

I think it is interesting that you feel the pen would be a good value in the $50-70 range. The price is $23 including shipping. Gama pens represent excellent value. I am very please with those I own. I will probably pick one of these up as well. Thank you for the excellent thorough review. I like the stock nibs, which makes it a bit easier.

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I have two of these, a brown patterned one and the glossy black one, and I like them very much. Wet writers, reliable, and hold a lot of ink.

 

P.S. but I do not think they would be worth $50 - $70. Their price point is nice for me now. But if they went to over $40 I would no longer buy.

Edited by mhguda

a fountain pen is physics in action... Proud member of the SuperPinks

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I think it is interesting that you feel the pen would be a good value in the $50-70 range. The price is $23 including shipping. Gama pens represent excellent value. I am very please with those I own. I will probably pick one of these up as well. Thank you for the excellent thorough review. I like the stock nibs, which makes it a bit easier.

 

Thanks! I hadn't seen asapens before. I've updated my original post to reflect this new information.

- - -

 

Currently trying to sell a Pelikan M400 White Tortoise. PM if you're interested. :)

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I'm interested in the discussion of what is the correct price for these. What would the correct price be if they had German screw in nib units and accepted cartridges or converters? We're working on a similar pen with that configuration with a lower price point than our oversized Rangas ......

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I'm interested in the discussion of what is the correct price for these. What would the correct price be if they had German screw in nib units and accepted cartridges or converters? We're working on a similar pen with that configuration with a lower price point than our oversized Rangas ......

In my view, fair value might require the following criteria:

 

1. if we consider a similar FP say made in USA that is handmade and uses german screw on nib section

 

2. then except for material ie. ebonite, the pricing relating to workmanship and quality of nib should be taken equivalently (unless there are no other difference in terms of filling mechanism)

I put my savings to test

Lamy & Pilot FPs the Best

No more I even think of the rest

(Preference Fine and Extra Fine Nibs)

Pen is meant for writing - not for looking :-)

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I'm interested in the discussion of what is the correct price for these. What would the correct price be if they had German screw in nib units and accepted cartridges or converters? We're working on a similar pen with that configuration with a lower price point than our oversized Rangas ......

 

It's hard to say. It depends a lot on how well the hardware and finishing is done. It also depends on what kind of ebonite would be offered.

Here's how I would put together the value of various features:

  • Standard size ebonite pen, like the Ratnamson no. 32, with an average clip, base value: $35
  • Larger size, closer to the Gama Forever: +$5
  • German nib unit, C/C system: +$20
  • Ripple ebonite: +$10
  • Really good clip and evenly set cap bands: +$20
  • Really good cap threads that secure/open in 3/4 to 1 turn: +$30
  • For USA markets, Being made domestically: +$30
  • Being custom made to the customer's requests and tested before shipping: +$100

 

So if you take just a few of these a la carte items and make an average pen with a German nib unit in a size like the Gama Forever, that's a $60 pen. If you achieve everything on the list, you wind up with a $250 pen that parallels a custom-ordered Edison pen. Mind you, this is all just my opinion. I'm an end user, not a salesman by any stretch of the imagination.

Edited by tomgartin

- - -

 

Currently trying to sell a Pelikan M400 White Tortoise. PM if you're interested. :)

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A price like that, compared with current pricing, where the Gama Forever costs $23 from Asapens (and I trust they make a profit, or they would not be able to continue in business) would defeat the idea of selling the pen at all. But I find your add-on amounts unrealistically high. Twenty dollars for a good clip? No way.

Take a look at the prices that Kevin at FPR sets for handmade pens from Guider, Deccan and the like. Those would be more in line with what's reasonable, to my mind. And, mind you, some of the members from India have complained in posts scattered around here that they think those prices are inflated. But some Guider models have both ED and converter versions, and the price difference between the two is of the order of 10 dollars. Which has indeed, in one case, meant the difference was small enough for me to opt for the convenience of the converter filled pen over the cheaper ED model. But at 15 or 20, or if buying more pens, I would go for the cheaper ED model and get the added benefit of a large quantity of ink in my pen.

a fountain pen is physics in action... Proud member of the SuperPinks

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I'm sorry, I originally wrote a much longer response, but opted to organize it into an a la carte bullet list to better illustrate my thinking, and in doing so I neglected to explain what I meant.

 

I should clarify that by "good clip" I don't just mean a clip, or even a springy clip. I mean overall attention to detail in constructing the cap around the clip.

I mean a clip that's plated, not just painted. I had two Rangas with gold-colored clips. They got kind of cloudy so I decided to polish them up using the same stuff I use on brass. The polishing compound completely removed the gold-colored paint.

I also included in that $20 feature the use of evenly set cap bands, which can be difficult to pull off. The band on my Ratnamson is perfectly symmetrical, but the Gama's bands are not (see above). I really like cap bands and appreciate the skill required for a craftsman to incorporate these into the design of a pen, and I think others would agree that a pen with nice hardware and cap bands captures the essence of added quality and value.

I also mean a clip that is affixed to the cap in a precise fashion so that the finial is flush on all sides and there is no exposed ring. I should also note that with both Rangas, as well as this Gama, each of their finials was affixed somewhat askew. I was happy to pay $75 for a handmade Ranga, but the evident lack of precision in the final assembly and choice of parts made me realize why Edisons, et al., are worth the higher premium.

IOW, I mean the machining of every part of the pen is done within very tight tolerances like the Edisons, Franklin-Christophs, and other pens that utilize the exact same German nibs. In my experience the cheaper pens compromise on those tolerances, and this is evident in my photos above. Quality commands a higher price.

 

If you can offer a high level of quality, $100 is not at all unreasonable. If you can offer the highest quality, then even $250 is feasible. But if you're only going to offer the most basic form of a pen, then I think my estimate of $35-50 represents a reasonable upper range. Other pens in that range are the Lamy Safari, Kaweco Sport, TWSBI Eco (soon to be released), and Pilot Prera. I think a handmade ebonite pen with a reliable German nib unit is a comparable option in that group.

 

Also, many people do not like ED pens because of burping, or because they like to change ink colors more often, or because they want to see the ink level, or they want to use cartridges for convenience or cleanliness. Ranga charges (last time I checked) $25 to add a JoWo nib unit to a pen. That's really just the cost of the actual unit and maybe a little extra cash to have the section threaded to accept it, versus a push-fit ebonite feed. So I think my estimate for this part of the value schema is on target, even if other features are more subjective.

- - -

 

Currently trying to sell a Pelikan M400 White Tortoise. PM if you're interested. :)

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Got mine from asapens.in - delivered a day back. Writes excellent

 

(img taken from mobile)

 

 

 

.

The two images below for comparison with Gama Supreme

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by a_m

I put my savings to test

Lamy & Pilot FPs the Best

No more I even think of the rest

(Preference Fine and Extra Fine Nibs)

Pen is meant for writing - not for looking :-)

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Got mine from asapens.in - delivered a day back. Writes excellent

 

(img taken from mobile)

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20140411_175446.jpg

 

.

The two images below for comparison with Gama Supreme

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20140413_075135.jpg

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20140413_075353.jpg

 

 

 

Oh, good grief! That Supreme looks enormous. I've got my Gama next to me, trying to imagine just how gigantic the Supreme is. I think it would be too big for my grip, but that red ripple ebonite looks delightful!

- - -

 

Currently trying to sell a Pelikan M400 White Tortoise. PM if you're interested. :)

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I have the Gama Supreme as well as the Kuyil….gorgeous and really huge.

 

Teri - I can understand the part about the german nib - but why a CC when you have a huge ED capacity? any major advantages apart from the convenience of inking?

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  • 1 month later...

I'm interested in the discussion of what is the correct price for these. What would the correct price be if they had German screw in nib units and accepted cartridges or converters? We're working on a similar pen with that configuration with a lower price point than our oversized Rangas ......

 

I got one from Ms Terri a few weeks ago (available in the website). The FP looked exactly the same as Mr. Tomgartin's pictures with the same colour.

 

It comes fitted with a JoWo broad nib. The price is affordable The pen is well balance with a good wet line. The body of the pen is quite long and with my average-size hand, I can write without posting the cap. It has become one of my daily writer.

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  • 4 months later...
coffeetoofull

Nice Review. I hope to see more of your ideas on India pens. I've often thought of modifying these pens without loosing their unique handmade appearance. I suggested the worldwide preference for better nibs to FPR and other India pen sellers. The consensus was that it's beyond their investment, for a market in India, which will not bear the price increase. That makes one wonder about their avenues for world wide marketing, among other things, like manufacturing capabilities for these markets.

Very Best Writings To You, coffeetoofull

Edited by coffeetoofull
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  • 5 months later...
mehandiratta

13675782165_2d56483be2_c.jpg

 

1. Appearance & Design = 7

  • To me, this pen looks like an homage to the Parker Duofold, but on a minimal scale. Gama did not do straight line knurling on the cap or bands at the tail of the pen, like the Duofolds have. Gama also used a generic big-ball clip, similar to a Pilot clip. It's derivative and economic, but still classic.
  • The material is a beautiful beige/black mottled ebonite, not as glossy as acrylic but very glossy by ebonite standards. The seams between the different pieces are very smooth, although the hardware (clip and cap bands) leave something to be desired.
  • The Gama name is engraved on the side of the barrel. The engraving does not appear to be from a laser, but a machine, and it is subtle but well done.
  • It came with a generic two-tone nib, which I replaced with a Knox two-tone nib and a later overfeed modification. The overfeed detracts from the aesthetic, but I'm leaving it in place because it is practical.
  • I deduct 3 points for the sloppy cap bands and clip attachment. If those could have been symmetrical and flush like the other joints on the pen, I think the appearance would have been a perfect ten.

2. Construction & Quality = 8

  • The execution of the cap bands is sloppy, with one side being too deeply inset, while the other side sticks out quite a bit. The attachment of the clip piece is also asymmetrical.
  • Capacity seems to be a hair over 3mL.
  • With some eyedroppers the section can fit too tightly, but Gama made this pen just right. As a result, I don't have any trouble removing the section to fill the barrel, and there is no danger of leakage.
  • The ebonite is of very good quality, and has held its luster very well over the first month or so of my usage. The gold coloring on the clip will eventually wear off, but it seems to be holding up pretty well for now.
  • Threading seems to be good--only 1 to 1.5 turns to remove the cap. However, I have noticed the cap will go on slightly crooked unless I leave it 1/8 turn looser than its tightest position.
  • I already deducted points for the sloppy cap band and clip attachment.
  • The section shape is comfortable and well proportioned, and the threads do not bother me when gripping the pen.
  • I deduct two points for the crookedness when the cap is closed.

3. Weight & Dimensions = 10

  • I don't have a digital scale, but I'd say the weight/size is comparable to a Ranga Model 3 or a TWSBI Vac 700. It's a large pen with a medium weight--not as nimble as a Parker 45, but there's no filling mechanism so it's fairly light and balanced toward the nib.
  • Dimensions:
    • Length capped: 145 mm
    • Length of cap: 67 mm
    • Length uncapped: 132 mm
    • Section at narrowest: 11 mm
    • Section near barrel: 13 mm
    • Body at widest: 14 mm
  • Balance is very good. This pen could post, but I don't think it's necessary. Unposted, this could be a very good session writer.
  • No points deducted here.

4. Nib & Performance = 8

  • The original nib wasn't bad. It was a generic two-tone steel fine nib with very good flow. It was a little scratchy, but smoothed out with only a couple minutes of tine adjustment and circles on my buff stick.
  • I've become a medium and broad nib convert, so I ordered a Knox B steel nib (size K35, comparable to a #6) from xfountainpens.com (no affiliation) and was able to do a very easy swap because the feed is somewhat loose-fitting in the section. I think this helps the ink flow, but it also means I didn't have to get the hair dryer to get the new nib in place. I was even able to squeeze an overfeed in there with some effort.
  • Flow is 10/10. It's a firehose. I'm using Diamine Ancient Copper in this pen because the saturation looks so good--almost as dark as oxblood red.
  • The Knox nib was very smooth when I received it, but I had some baby bottom issues. I had to press the nib somewhat firmly on the first stroke to get the ink flowing, and had lots of skipping due to the nib (remember, the flow was more than adequate). Baby bottom is hard to fix, but I think I've just about banished it. The Knox B is stubbish and a little springy, making this a very pleasurable session writer.
  • I deduct two points for a scratchy nib out of the box, but I won't deduct any more because the fit of the feed and rate of flow are remarkably good.

5. Filling System & Maintenance = 9

  • There's no better scenario than a generously flowing pen with a generously sized reservoir. This one holds about 3 mL and fills as an eyedropper.
  • I deduct one point for the eyedropper filling because there is no ink window, and it can be a little messy.
  • However, this pen deserves a solid nine because an ED requires almost no maintenance and delivers a lot of ink. I use an ink syringe for better control when filling, and I think I can fill it just as fast as a piston filler.

6. Cost & Value = 10

  • I received this from a friend here on FPN, and "free" is always the best price. I think these go for around $50-70 on eBay. Edit: At about $23 on asapens.in (no affiliation) this is a steal. The equivalent Ranga is closer to $40, but I think the Gama has a nicer finish. This ebonite holds its gloss very well, and it's nice to have some accent hardware (even if they're attached somewhat askew) and a clean engraving of the manufacturer name.
  • The machining is very good. Fit of threads is also better than the Ranga Model 3 pens I've handled, so I think that's worth the extra cost. But, the selling point for me is the flow. Gama's feed manufacture is simple, but well executed. Again, the attachment of the hardware is somewhat sloppy, but it's not a deal breaker, in my view.
  • This is a pen that will hold up well because of negligible maintenance, provides a very good experience for long session writing (size, balance, medium weight, and ebonite material), and can be fitted with any #6 nib to suit your tastes.

7. Conclusion = 52/60

  • Overall, I feel this is a very enjoyable pen to use and I really did not expect it to be such a wet writer. At $70, would I buy this pen? Yes--entirely because of the wet feed. Did I get lucky? I don't know. Maybe other Gama customers will weigh in on how the flow and setup was on their pens. To me, this particular pen is very worthwhile in the sub-$100 category. Edit: Available from asapens.in for $23 under other names. Very good value.
  • I'll bring it with me to the upcoming pen show. If you'd like to test it out, just send me a message or find me in the crowd.
  • If you're looking for a large session writer that won't fatigue your hand, and if you have even a tiny bit of ingenuity when it comes to adjusting or replacing a nib, this is worth a look.

 

 

The following photos were taken with my iPhone 5c, using HDR mode. For the closeup shots, I affixed a loupe, which gives a slight fisheye effect, but provides the best level of detail.

 

 

12273141283_3fee973f16_c.jpg

What I received from my friend: Gama two-tone, Ratnamson no. 32, and Oliver 81. A very kind gift. :)

 

12273449124_3b28362dab_c.jpg

The original nib. Not much to look at, but it was okay.

 

13675782335_b4aa0c207f_c.jpg

Buddy shot with the Ratnamson no. 32. Note the difference between the two ebonite samples. The Gama is swirled with a rich black, and shows more depth. Learn more about my R32 project, including some discussion of the overfeed modification, here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/261306-ratnamson-no-32-with-kaweco-sport-nibfeed/

 

13676125524_919e382a38_c.jpg

Beautiful material.

 

13675786785_7047f2f365_c.jpgAnother view of the ebonite.

 

13675786205_31b955618a_c.jpg

Where the threads meet the section. Note how the threads are smoothed toward the body.

 

13676129554_c7fc642d33_c.jpg

The section is not concave, that's just an effect of looking through the loupe. Note the size of the step at the end of the grip, which provides a comfortable and secure hold.

 

13676129764_4aa1199b61_c.jpg

My overfeed isn't pretty, but it fits very well. You can see how the DAC has oxidized around the overfeed. The nib underneath is quite pretty, with a little lion and everything, so I'm sorry you don't get to see it.

 

13675829433_17d674402f_c.jpg

Note the chamfer at the opening to the section. This makes it super easy to fit the feed in place. The ebonite feed is handmade, and somewhat crude, but well executed.

 

13675791975_4e1e8909c8_c.jpg

Here you can see how flush the endpiece was finished.

 

13675832653_c1ae0b9542_c.jpg

Another view of the endpiece. That tiny gap where you see the glue is impossible for me to feel with my fingernail. I didn't even see it until I looked at the pictures.

 

13675782735_9725c896bb_c.jpg

The Gama name engraved on the barrel. Perhaps carved by a CNC machine? Doesn't look laser-etched. I kind of like it.

 

13675790435_d6bac0725c_c.jpg

The ball is formed from folded steel--very shiny.

 

13675793385_75ba950bbc_c.jpg

This is the side of the cap bands that is too deeply inset.

 

13675836273_30151fdd0d_c.jpg

The other side of the cap, where the bands are not inset deeply enough and do not match each other.

 

13676135864_e8a12ae9b8_c.jpg

Here you can see the side of the clip attachment ring that sticks out from the finial slightly.

 

13675795185_e2e1a2c249_c.jpg

And here, the side of the clip attachment that is too far in. Other manufacturers create a seat so this isn't visible, but Gama took a shortcut on this part. It ruins an otherwise flawlessly flush finish on the rest of the pen.

 

13675837303_7210a35d47_c.jpg

fabulous pics...

vaibhav mehandiratta

architect & fountain pen connoisseur

 

blog | instagram | twitter

 

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mehandiratta

Continuing to what u have reviewed above...

 

1st pen in pic in green mottled finish: Gama Popular ... which is called popular because it sells in massive nos and by virtue of that is is popular....nib is excellent, soft and wet....

 

2nd pen in pic in blue rippled finish: Ratnamson 302 ... which is model from one of the oldest seller in India .... same price bracket as Popular above.... very well finished.... Nib is fine and stiff but not scratchy...

 

 

fpn_1429178649__akmxonowtekui3wbnb93sj5f

vaibhav mehandiratta

architect & fountain pen connoisseur

 

blog | instagram | twitter

 

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      Even so, you'd end up with a fragmented list, and it becomes an O(N²) process for each prospective requestor to check what is available: effectively recreate the list of currently active servers (without any reliable up-to-date info upfront about the inks and number of samples on offer in the thread) from the sequential list of posts, which may be spread over two or even more pages, and then query each server independently to check what is currently on offer.   It comes down to not hav
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