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Does Waterman Laureat Take Standard International Converters?


theobromine
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I have a c.1987 Waterman Laureat I'd like to rehabilitate and return to service.

 

Do these pens take standard international converters?

 

When I look up "Waterman converter" I find two different part numbers, 56010 and 56010W. Is there a difference?

 

 

Thank you,

 

Robert

 

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  • Jerome Tarshis

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Yes, they accept the 'modern' screw type. Try to buy one with a chrome ring near the mouth piece because there have been some issues with the very latest all plastic (black) mouth.

 

fpn_1392411506__dscn0424.jpg

Edited by Force
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And all the Laureats I've had take an international standard. Waterman proprietary not required.

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I use Waterman twist piston converters in my Laureats. Like Force, I use the ones with steel collars.

 

Those aren't currently being produced, so you may need to buy them on eBay, as I did, or at a pen enthusiasts' meeting, or at a pen show. Not to omit flea markets.

 

I've just now tried a Schmidt K5 converter, a Montblanc push-fit converter (not a current item), and a Pelikan converter, all of which ought to be OK for standard-international-cartridge pens, none of which quite fits the Laureat nib unit. There may be an international converter that does, and it may be that other respondents will jump in with an exactly right recommendation. Often enough, trial and error will be the way forward. The Laureat definitely takes standard international short cartridges.

 

Thousands of people are using the new Waterman converters, whether or not they feel good about the black plastic collar. It may not be everyone's favorite, but it is usable.

Edited by Jerome Tarshis
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  • 2 weeks later...

This is an opportune thread. Just this weekend I brought out my Laureat, which I got as a present in 1989. I had used it from time to time and found it to be a smooth writer and very comfortable to hold, but somehow, something seemed to be not quite right about it. Last week I happened to obtain Sheaffer red ink and decided to make Binder Burgundy with the Waterman purple I had. It occurred to me that the Laureat, being black-red-gold laquer, would be the perfect pen for this ink. So I tried it and it was! Wrote beautifullly, leaving a wet line that nevertheless dried quickly. I had found the perfect ink for the pen and I now love it. But...

 

Here's the problem: When I removed the converter, the top half-inch was soaked. No leakage from the section or into the barrel; just a slightly drippy coating of ink on the converter. I tried a standard international converter, but it doesn't fit. I tried an old empty Waterman cartridge, but it was too loose. So I emptied an unused cartridge with a syringe, filled it with fhe BindBurg, and it's holding its own with no leakage so far. The converter, BTW, didn't come with the Laureat; I believe it came with a Phileas I lost years ago. It has a chrome collar at the tip and seems to work fine when I fill it with water. (Unfortunately, I don't have another Waterman c/c pen with which to test it.) So, I can use the pen and I'm happy with that, but it leaves me wondering what's wrong with the pen/converter combination, and should I get another converter to try or should I just stick with refilling cartridges. Any thoughts?

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If the converter was pressed into the section for a long time maybe its mouth has deformed enough so as not to seal tight. Maybe a new converter or stick with filling a cartridge.

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