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Long-Term Storage


TheAkwardNinja
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Being only a high school student, I have spare money I can use for ink. I plan or at least want to continue using fountain pens into college. So now that I have spare money, money left from saving for college, should I begin to buy, store, and keep until I begin college, in maybe three years? What happens to the ink?

 

Thanks!

-Ave María, grátia pléna, Dóminus técum. Benedícta tu in muliéribus, et benedíctus frúctus véntris túi, Iésus. Sáncta María, Máter Déi, óra pro nóbis peccatóribus, nunc et in hóra mórtis nóstrae. Amen.-

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Most inks will be fine for quite a few years (even decades).

 

Don't sweat it too much imo. Just try to avoid brands that are somewhat notorious for SITB ( jHerbin for example )

 

Judging from your location, Noodler's is probably your first choice of ink, so you should be fine.

 

 

 

ps. I think you are overconcerned. A bottle of ink is not all that expensive, so that you would need to start stocking up from now. Unless you want to have a pretty wide range of colors which is another story... :P

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Save your money and put it into something that will give you a return ... even a small one. The amount of effort it takes to haul around extra stuff is annoying and eventually, costly. Then, when you get to college, you won't have enough room to keep your inks. Just buy what you want, and use what you have.

 

That being said, I still have my inks from college and that was 3 decades ago. Most inks will do just fine. Despite my tests, if I were going to keep them for long term, I'd leave them unopened and in the boxes in a temperate environment.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



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My only advice in anecdotal but I'd recommend keeping them stored out of direct light. I keep mine in a drawer and haven't had problems even with my oldest inks that a years old.

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I've had some inks in storage for around 4 years. Brought some out recently, it's just fine. If it was a previously opened bottle, I'd check it out for ickies, but thus far, fine.

 

Oh, and I wouldn't worry about purchasing a lot of ink to store. Use it as you go, a bottle here, a sample there. Ink is less expensive than other things for college.

Edited by kiavonne

Scribere est agere.

To write is to act.

___________________________

Danitrio Fellowship

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Most inks will be fine for quite a few years (even decades).

 

Don't sweat it too much imo. Just try to avoid brands that are somewhat notorious for SITB ( jHerbin for example )

 

Judging from your location, Noodler's is probably your first choice of ink, so you should be fine.

 

 

 

ps. I think you are overconcerned. A bottle of ink is not all that expensive, so that you would need to start stocking up from now. Unless you want to have a pretty wide range of colors which is another story... :P

 

Why would someone in Idaho be choosing an ink made in Massachusetts first?

Sensitive Pen Restoration doesn't cost extra.

 

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Is there an ink made in Idaho? :D

 

Other than that, the poster was probably thinking region by country, Noodler's is readily available to us - and a better value in my opinion. But... for me, not only do I like the ink, but I like that it is made in the USA by a USA small business.

Edited by kiavonne

Scribere est agere.

To write is to act.

___________________________

Danitrio Fellowship

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Which of your fountain pens have you chosen for primary note-taking in college ? Is it a cartridge pen ?

What about ink ? Have you decided ?

 

Meanwhile, enjoy your fountain pens.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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Just keep it away from direct sunlight or extreme temperatures (freezing point or 40ºC). Having them on their original boxes keep them quite fine. They last decades! IMHO, Noodler's and Diamine are widely available and have similar costs per size offered. I wish you long-lasting lessons and learnings in your college studies :)

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Why would someone in Idaho be choosing an ink made in Massachusetts first?

 

Noodler's is easily obtainable and ultra cheap within the USA.

Being a European resident I can assure you that these do not apply where I live.

 

 

Ninja, consider also buying bigger bottles of ink to minimize cost per unit.

Noodler's, Pelikan, Pilot (even JHerbin, but careful there) offer bigger bottles of ink.

I think Diamine does also, but you would have to contact them directly and special order it.

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I do have many ink options through Goulet Pens (no affiliation), I rather like the quality of Diamine inks, though I haven't ever tried any Noodler's.

 

Also, I use converter, Lamy Al-Star EF.

Edited by TheAkwardNinja

-Ave María, grátia pléna, Dóminus técum. Benedícta tu in muliéribus, et benedíctus frúctus véntris túi, Iésus. Sáncta María, Máter Déi, óra pro nóbis peccatóribus, nunc et in hóra mórtis nóstrae. Amen.-

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