Jump to content

Need Help From The Experienced Experts


drewmey

Recommended Posts

Being an engineering student, I am normally a mechanical pencil guy. I am not a pen collector (yet ;)). However, I am in the market for a good, solid, metal pen that will last. So I decided to come to the pen experts to see if they had a recommendation for me.

 

What I want:

I will be needing a pen for more permanent work in my field (commercial construction) for signatures, proposals, and bids. I probably won't be using it for lengthy writing. I was going to get a Lamy Safari or even Al-Star. However, I had the opportunity to hold a Lamy Safari and was not happy with the weight or the fact that it was plastic (even though it was nice plastic). When I I write with mechanical pencils, I normally use a rotring 600, 800, or staedtler 925-25 to give you an idea of my taste. I would prefer a look more similar to those than a sleek, modern looking pen. I am hoping to spend <$50 but would increase my budget slightly if there was a great pen that I liked the look of. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 14
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • drewmey

    4

  • Joe in Seattle

    1

  • Uncle Red

    1

  • yogalarva

    1

Parker IM? Made of metal, and quite cheap.

Tes rires retroussés comme à son bord la rose,


Effacent mon dépit de ta métamorphose;


Tu t'éveilles, alors le rêve est oublié.



-Jean Cocteau, from Plaint-Chant, 1923

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Levenger L-Tech, will feel a lot like a drafting pencil. Kaweco AL Sport or Special. Schrade Tactical Pen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotring made ballpoints and fountain pens. I have both. They are built for the ages. The steel F nib on my Lava 600 is as smooth and reliable as a gold nib. Inquire here, or go to a reliable EBay seller.

"how do I know what I think until I write it down?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have one, but the Lamy CP1 is around $50, looks very classy, and I think the thickness is on par with a mechanical pencil. It's pretty thin, but if you are more interested in looks and will be using your pen briefly then it might be a good idea. Lamy nibs are also interchangeable, which is a nice plus. :-)

Fountain pen blog | Personal blog

 

Current collection: Pilot Vanishing Point, TWSBI Vac 700, Kaweco Al Sport, Lamy Safari, Nemosine Singularity

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for all the great ideas. Already knew about some rotring pens that I love the look of. They are just a little out of my budget unless I could find a really good deal. With just first impressions, I really like the look of the Levenger L-tech. I'll read up on all of them and see if one stands out. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Parker 45 in "brushed" stainless steel is in the price range. It rides nicely in the pocket.

I think you will appreciate the design that allows easy and total user maintenance of the pen.

It is "vintage", but very reliable and millions have endured for decades. A Parker 45 has been

in my pocket, daily, for forty years.

 

If you were graduating with your engineering degree, or from medical school, or entering the job market as a junior

executive, my gift to you would be a Parker 45.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This:

http://www.cultpens.com/acatalog/Cult-Pens-Mini-Fountain-Pen.html

No affiliation just a happy customer (not of the exact model though, but it might be what you are looking for )

People who want to share their religious views with you almost never want you to share yours with them - Dave Berry

 

Min danske webshop med notesbøger, fyldepenne og blæk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you like Rotring MPs, then it makes sense to get a Rotring FP too. Otherwise, you might spend more money buying multiple cheap pens than the Rotring costs to replicate how the latter feels/works.

 

FWIW, there was this thread on FPGeeks from someone selling some Rotring FPs; you might want to consider the Newton, which is also a fairly heavy, all-metal pen. I've got a Newton (not the Lava, unfortunately) and found it to be a pretty good pen...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Parker 45 in "brushed" stainless steel is in the price range. It rides nicely in the pocket.

I think you will appreciate the design that allows easy and total user maintenance of the pen.

It is "vintage", but very reliable and millions have endured for decades. A Parker 45 has been

in my pocket, daily, for forty years.

 

If you were graduating with your engineering degree, or from medical school, or entering the job market as a junior

executive, my gift to you would be a Parker 45.

Didn't you catch that I am an engineer graduating soon...hint hint :-) Ha but thanks for the good idea. I'm checking that one out too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lamy 2000, maybe. I know it may be over your budget, but you could find them used for only a little higher than $50. A nice graduation gift, maybe :-)

 

It has that unmistakable Bauhaus style, which means it isn't flashy enough to attract too much attention (read: thieves).

 

And it is practically indestructable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

If you don't mind a slight potential for needing tinkering, Chinese pens are often heavy and good writers (plus, the price is right for taking along with field work), try the Jinhao 450 and 750 as a starting point, they're good pens for a very good price (sadly, the catch is that QC is not always the greatest, but I've never had a Jinhao pen that didn't work so you should be alright).

Edited by WirsPlm
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Just for information purposes, I chose to go with a Levenger L Tech Stealth with a TWSBI 580 1.1 Stub for a signature pen and a Rotring Rapid Pro Ballpoint with a Parker Gel Refill for a quick notes pen. Thanks for all the help. It made me think a lot about what I wanted and gave me some good options to look at. Would have killed the budget if I hadn't saved up so many Amazon/Bing Rewards gift certificates.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      43844
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      33432
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. inkstainedruth
      inkstainedruth
      26425
    5. jar
      jar
      26101
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • bramley
      I have the Sailor Naginata and some fancy blade nibs coming after 2022 by a number of new workshop from China.  With all my respect, IMHO, they are all (bleep) in doing chinese characters.  Go use a bush, or at least a bush pen. 
    • A Smug Dill
      It is the reason why I'm so keen on the idea of a personal library — of pens, nibs, inks, paper products, etc. — and spent so much money, as well as time and effort, to “build” it for myself (because I can't simply remember everything, especially as I'm getting older fast) and my wife, so that we can “know”; and, instead of just disposing of what displeased us, or even just not good enough to be “given the time of day” against competition from >500 other pens and >500 other inks for our at
    • adamselene
      Agreed.  And I think it’s good to be aware of this early on and think about at the point of buying rather than rationalizing a purchase..
    • A Smug Dill
      Alas, one cannot know “good” without some idea of “bad” against which to contrast; and, as one of my former bosses (back when I was in my twenties) used to say, “on the scale of good to bad…”, it's a spectrum, not a dichotomy. Whereas subjectively acceptable (or tolerable) and unacceptable may well be a dichotomy to someone, and finding whether the threshold or cusp between them lies takes experiencing many degrees of less-than-ideal, especially if the decision is somehow influenced by factors o
    • adamselene
      I got my first real fountain pen on my 60th birthday and many hundreds of pens later I’ve often thought of what I should’ve known in the beginning. I have many pens, the majority of which have some objectionable feature. If they are too delicate, or can’t be posted, or they are too precious to face losing , still they are users, but only in very limited environments..  I have a big disliking for pens that have the cap jump into the air and fly off. I object to Pens that dry out, or leave blobs o
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files






×
×
  • Create New...