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First Pen Suggestions - Details Inside



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How does it compare to the Safari/Metropolitan, and what are the pros and cons of each?

 

I have all three, and I think you would be better off sticking to Safari or Metropolitan.

 

Kaweco sports is a great writer, extremely smooth nib and all. However, it is a very small pen. Which actually is an advantage because it is extremely portable. It is my travel pen. However, since you HAVE to post (put the cap on the back of the pen) to make it into a functional length, it does take a few extra second to get it ready. (I always post anyway, but posting a cap is a highly controversial topic, and some people would cringe at the thought of a newbie getting "trained" to post all the time.) If you are using it in a classroom setting to take notes, it might become annoying. Also, it can take a tiny squeeze converter, but it is the type that is hard to see how much of ink is left inside, so you'd be stuck using cartridges most of the time, which would not be as economical. You can do the Eye dropper conversion, but that means you'd have to buy silicon grease and O ring, adding extra expenses, and I tend to be too risk-averse to give it a try myself. So- as much as I love my Kaweco sport, I would not recommend it as your first pen.

 

Speaking of ink capacity, I do have to say that Lamy cartridge can take a LOT of ink. If you use the ink syringe to refill the cartridge, you'd get the best of both world, economy and great ink capacity.

 

I think everyone said just about everything about Metropolitan already, but its cartridge has a great ink capacity as well, plus you can easily see how much of ink is left inside. It was one of the first pens I got when I was starting to really get into fountain pens a little over a year ago, and it is still a daily-writer.

 

I don't think you can go wrong with either Safari or Metropolitan, but I still recommend actually looking at/ holding a Safari to see if you are comfortable with the grip section.

 

Have fun!!!

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Thanks everyone! I've decided to get the Metropolitan.

As for ink, some of the Waterman colours and my favourite mixed sample package are out of stock. Should I wait (it's hard :puddle:) or spring for a bottle of Noodler's? I'm looking at Bad Blue Heron, 54th Massachusetts, and Black Swan in Australian Roses in particular.

 

Also, should I be worried about cold temperatures and exploding bottles?

Edited by bokchoy
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Get one pack of Pilot cartridges (for refilling) and wait to get a bottle of ink in a color you really want. Likely, you will be able to source your ink in Canada (or take a day trip to the Northwest US, if close enough) to get ink without the ugly postage costs.

Edited by kiavonne

Scribere est agere.

To write is to act.

___________________________

Danitrio Fellowship

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I say see if you can go somewhere and try out a few pens. Then collect the things you like and try to find a pen with those properties. Sometimes, even if a pen looks right, it might not suit you.

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Based on my experience, wait for what you want, rather than settle for something else.

Otherwise you will forever be wondering....what if....

 

yeah I know what it is like to have to wait. In your case also you need to watch out for the weather. If the ink freezes, it could break the bottle, and that could be messy if it wasn't packed in a separate plastic bag to catch any leaks.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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If the ink you want is Waterman Blue Black, the rumor has it that Parker Quink Blue Black is the same color, and the cost is about the same. I have used Parker Blue Black, and it is an excellent ink.

 

All the Noodler's ink you've mentioned are great choice. Since Noodler's bottles contain so much ink, and since they are so saturated to the point where you can dilute it, they are extremely cost-effective.

 

There was a whole thread about exploding ink bottles... I haven't had personal experience yet (knock on wood!) but it seems like a nasty business for sure.... Hopefully spring will arrive soon at the Great While North. And yes, if you live in/ near a big city, check to see if there is any actual store that sells ink. Or Staple's, as many of them carry Parker Quink. When I was in Montreal, I found Parker Quink Blue Black at a Staple's (although they have a different name there) and was quite impressed....

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What would you recommend for loops that are narrow to the point of disappearing?

 

 

I recommend an Extra Fine Nib, since your e's aren't that big. Remember, Japanese nibs tend to run narrower, so a Pilot Fine, Sailor Fine, would be considered a Western Extra Fine. If you want an ink with shading, I can recommend from experience Diamine Meadow, Diamine Mediterranean Blue. I like very much Diamine because you get almost 3 oz of ink with good lubrication and easy cleaning.

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Greetings -

 

I have am considering purchasing a fountain pen (an Onoto) which would be a considerable investment to what I am used to using (a Quill Roller Ball).

 

I am a daily user of Quill Roller Balls - I carry two Graphite/Steel body pens with me everywhere. However, over the years they have taken a beating (I am rough on pens) - and I was debating whether to purchase an Onoto in either the Roller Ball or a Fountain Pen. In my line of work I do a lot of writing so I do not just buy off the shelf pens; however, I am a bit heavy handed on the application of pen to paper.

 

I have heard many great things about the Onoto Fountain pen. The one I am looking at is a school alumni pen (460 USD). My concern would be that I am perhaps to forceful (on the writing tip) kind of guy - and I may be looking at disaster in going the Fountain Pen route.

 

The thing is the Onoto pen is so costly and produced in such limited quantity that I will probably only afford only one, so I am torn between a the reliable Roller Ball tip or trying out the Fountain Pen tip.

 

Might anyone have some suggestions for me as a novice looking to make the leap from daily Roller Ball to Fountain Pen? Many kind thanks for your reply.

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GabrielleDuVent

If the ink you want is Waterman Blue Black, the rumor has it that Parker Quink Blue Black is the same color, and the cost is about the same. I have used Parker Blue Black, and it is an excellent ink.

 

 

This is true. Waterman and Parker inks are manufactured in the same place (or the same formula or what have you) so the packaging is different, but the contents are the same.

 

Dietz, I suggest you open a new topic rather than continue this one, as your concerns are different from the OP's.

Tes rires retroussés comme à son bord la rose,


Effacent mon dépit de ta métamorphose;


Tu t'éveilles, alors le rêve est oublié.



-Jean Cocteau, from Plaint-Chant, 1923

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Uh oh... I've been reading about people who've put glass-bottled drinks in freezers. There were many explosive results :yikes:. Unfortunately, I can see something similar happening to ink bottles on their way here.

 

How does this sound?

 

Pilot Metropolitan (M, equivalent to Lamy F)

Pilot Plumix (1.0mm italic)

Pilot blue-black cartridges (pack of 12)

 

No bottled ink, but I've wanted to try an italic nib for a long time :D

 

Thanks for all the great advice so far!

Edited by bokchoy
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Plaisir can be converted into an eyedropper (I think), and should your nib fail, you can always buy a preppy and exchange the nibs. Lamy comes with "change nibs yourself" option, which is pretty nice. Another thing with Pilot is their converter isn't see-through, so I never know how much I've filled. Plaisir does well with angles, but Lamy has smoother downstrokes and curls.

Since the Plaisir's body is metal, eyedroppering is out.

 

As the OP has noted settling on a Metropolitan, it should be noted (given the description of small handwriting), that you can replace the Metro's M nib with a F or EF from a Pilot 78g, for example, or an EF from a Pilot Penmanship. Which we've done here, Mrs. Ouzel having a very small "hand", and all.

 

The Metropolitan's a lovely pen, and an excellent start.

Edited by Water Ouzel
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Pilot Metropolitan (M, equivalent to Lamy F)

Pilot Plumix (1.0mm italic)

Pilot blue-black cartridges (pack of 12)

 

:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

 

You can get an ink syringe and a bottled ink later, when you have more money saved up. BTW if there is a loonie store near you, check to see if they have a syringe/ pipette for cosmetics. I found a great one there, with a super-long (7.5cm, long enough to reach all the way to the end of just about any cartridge) needle that is about 1mm wide, so that you don't have to worry about giving yourself a tattoo, one dot at a time. Then you will be ready when you get a bottle of ink or a sample.

 

Have fun!

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I'd like to thank everyone for giving this newbie extremely helpful advice! :)

I've ordered these goodies:

 

Pilot Metropolitan (M, equivalent to Lamy F)

Pilot Plumix (1.0mm italic)

Pilot blue-black cartridges (pack of 12)

 

Happy fountain pen writing!

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Congrats! You are in for some fun, soon...

Scribere est agere.

To write is to act.

___________________________

Danitrio Fellowship

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