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Lamy 2000 - Medium Or Broad



dragos.mocanu

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dragos.mocanu

Hello,

 

Today I've finally decided, I want to buy a Lamy 2000. But I have a bit of a problem...I don't know which nib size I should get. I have medium sized handwriting, but I can effectively use nibs spanning from F (0.5mm!?) to 1.4mm stubs (that's the maximum I have at the moment), because I usually write cursive with smaller nibs (F, M) and print/italic with larger ones. That being said, which of the two sizes would you recommend?

 

From what I've seen around here, the Broad nibs tend to have a bit of line variation (like a stub); is that the case with all Lamy 2000 Broads?

 

Thank you!

Edited by dragos.mocanu

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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I have a Lamy 2000 with a medium nib and it puts down a line a bit wider than a TWSBI 540 M and Pilot vanishing point M.

Change is not mandatory, Survival is not required.

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Japanese nibs are 'narrower' than marked compared to western, that Pilot would be a western M-F according to Richard Binder's width chart.

Each and all companies have their very own standards to what a width is. Then there is slop/tolerance.

From what I read Lamy makes a slightly wider nib, than a Pelikan though I've seen no chart with them on it.

Modern Pelikan is wider than semi/or vintage nibs of theirs.

 

I'd get a M, if it is too wide you can send it in when 'new' for a nib change to B if M is not what you want.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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I would suggest the medium nib. With only one choice I would think the medium nib more veritable.

Avatar painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 - 1905) titled La leçon difficile (The difficult lesson)

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Unlike the other Lamy pens (Studio, CP1, Logo, Safari) you can't swap out the nib if you find it writes to broadly. You are stuck with the 2000 nib unless you send it in for replacement.

 

Any chance that you can visit a pen shop and test one in person? Best to be sure.

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When I bought mine it had a B nib that was really B and too broad for my (quite large) handwriting...had it replaced with a M nib and it's perfect now

 

HTH

Cees

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Check out the Nib Nook on GouletPens.com. It'll let you compare writing samples from the M and B Lamy 2000 nibs to various other pens/nibs you may be familiar with.

 

Good luck.

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My Lamy 2000 with a medium nib is a lovely, wet writer. It took two or three adjustments to make it so, and the tines were misaligned out-of-box too..

 

Though perfectly wet for my taste now, and my best pen, I think that I am quite likely to get a broad when I can afford it.

 

I don't think the broad would be too much, based on images of writing samples I've seen online, but on balance I suggest the medium.

 

Someone on this board very intelligently said recently that they expected to have to tweak the nibs on new pens because everyone's taste (especially concerning wetness, and thereby smoothness and breadth of line) differs.

Edited by lurcho
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SharkOnWheels456

My medium nib does not agree with me at all :/ Something must be wrong with my writing angle (either that or I got a dud nib), because it writes more like a somewhat-wet fine medium. Every 2000 broad I've written with has been very BROAD, writing a nice, smooth, wet line. Sadly, it is a bit toothick for my writing, but it should be fine if you've used up to 1.4mm nibs before, which are a good bit wider than the broad line.

“I say, if your knees aren’t green by the end of the day, you ought to seriously re-examine your life.”-Calvin

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The Lamy 2000 nibs definitely tend to have line variation, just by how the nib is cut. My fine has a stubbish appearance when writing with it, although much less so than my Medium. If it were my decision, I would go with the Medium because it is more versatile, and will look more appropriate for everyday writing because it is not as subby as the broad.

 

 

 

Good luck,

Nick

"It is much more interesting to live life not knowing, than having answers which might be wrong."

"Courage is grace under pressure" ~ Ernest Hemingway

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Abner C. Kemp

I also suggest looking at the nib nook on Goulet. Lamy nibs do tend to run broad. I am currently using a Lamy 2000 with an Extra Fine nib that writes much more like a Japanese Fine. My pen also runs pretty wet. The nib is quite springy in the first place and even offers some very subtle line variation in the extra fine.

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The Broad nib on my L2k was too wide for me, I ended up sending it in to P. Brown to be stubbed and am very much pleased with it now. I wish I had purchased a medium in retrospect. My forays into Broads will be only with the intention of having them stubbed from here forward, perhaps a BB for a signature pen...

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dragos.mocanu

Hmm...so many in favor of the Medium nib...I guess I'll go with this, and see how it goes. I suppose I could exchange it if it's not wide enough for my taste. Thank you very much for the opinions.

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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Lamy nibs run wide, a Medium is more like a broad to me. I would go with the medium myself.

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Are Lamy B and BB stubbish like those of MB or do they have typical spherical tips?

Edited by Blade Runner
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Are Lamy B and BB stubbish like those of MB or do they have typical spherical tips?

I don't know about the B nib on a 2000, but the broad nib I have that fits my Safari has a fair amount of line variation, as you might expect from a stub.

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I LOVE the broad nib on mine. As mentioned, it has stub qualities and lays down a nice thick line. My handwriting could be described as medium sized, and I take notes with it regularly; I do not think it is too broad for everyday writing. You can get a boring old M nib anywhere, but if you're looking for an expressive line this is a great option.

 

It is important to note that the nib has a very specific sweet spot that takes some getting used to.

Edited by Anabasis
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My medium point has been writing well out-of-the-box. It has become my go to pen when I need a reliable writer.

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Even though I've already replied here, may I risk belabouring the point by saying again that if you do buy the medium (or the broad), please don't put up with it if it's not quite wet enough or if it's otherwise not quite to your taste.

 

The Lamy 2000 is capable of being a really superb writer. Really, really great. If yours isn't, send it back, send it to a nibmeister, or, if you feel up to it, fiddle with it yourself.

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dragos.mocanu

Even though I've already replied here, may I risk belabouring the point by saying again that if you do buy the medium (or the broad), please don't put up with it if it's not quite wet enough or if it's otherwise not quite to your taste.

 

The Lamy 2000 is capable of being a really superb writer. Really, really great. If yours isn't, send it back, send it to a nibmeister, or, if you feel up to it, fiddle with it yourself.

Given the reputation this pen has made for itself, I will do exactly that: If I don't like it, for any particular reason, I will return it. But we'll see..I'll post an update as soon as the pen arrives

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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